Visual merchandising

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Visual merchandising

  1. 1. VISUALMERCHANDISING
  2. 2. VISUAL MEANINGRelating to the sense of sight.MERCHANDISING MEANINGMerchandising is a marketingpractice in which the brand orimage from one product orservice is used to sell another
  3. 3. VISUALMERCHANDISING ?
  4. 4. Coordination of physical elements in place ofbusiness, so that its project the right image toits customersChange a “passive looker into active buyers”Responsible for total merchandiseOverall business imagePlacements of design elements
  5. 5. Contd……..It is the activity and profession of developingthe floor plans and three dimensionaldisplays in order to maximize their salesThe display of products which makes themappealing and attractiveIt utilizes displays, colors, lighting ,smellsand sounds
  6. 6. PURPOSE OFVISUAL MERCHANDISING
  7. 7. The purpose is to attract ,engage,motivate the customers towardsmaking a purchaseBoth goods and services can bedisplayed to highlight their featuresand benefits
  8. 8. PRINCIPLES OFVISUAL MERCHANDISING
  9. 9. Make it easier for the customer to locatethe desired category and merchandiseMake it easier to self selectMake it possible to coordinate andaccessorizeEducate about the product in an effectiveand creative wayMake proper arrangements in such a way toincrease the sale of unsought goods
  10. 10. IMPORTANCE OFVISUAL MERCHANDISING
  11. 11. Purposes are to sell products and promotestore imageShould always try to be different, new, andcreativeChange a “passive looker” into an “activebuyer”Enhances brand imageGenerates impulse salesOverall business image
  12. 12. VISUAL MERCHANDISING SUCCESS FACTORS
  13. 13. ERRORS TO AVOID INVISUAL MERCHANDISING
  14. 14. Too much signageConfusing traffic patternsToo much proppingDisconnection between exteriorwindow and store contentsPoor lightingNo point of viewInconsistency in visual executions
  15. 15. OBJECTIVES OF AGOOD STORE DESIGN
  16. 16. Design should:be consistent with image and strategypositively influence consumer behaviorconsider costs versus valuebe flexiblerecognize the needs of the disabled –The Americans with Disabilities Act
  17. 17. OBJECTIVES OF THESTORE ENVIRONMENT
  18. 18.  Get customers into the store (store image)  Serves a critical role in the store selection process  Important criteria include cleanliness, labeled prices, accurate and pleasant checkout clerks, and well-stocked shelves  The store itself makes the most significant and last impression Once they are inside the store, convert them into customers buying merchandise (space productivity)  The more merchandise customers are exposed to that is presented in an orderly manner, the more they tend to buy
  19. 19. APPAREL WALL PRESENTATION OF THE MERCHANDISE
  20. 20. INCORRECT
  21. 21. Fashion apparel wall presentation.In the correct example, formal balance isachieved by creating a mirror image ofgarment on both sides of a center line. Thisdoes not occur in the incorrect example
  22. 22. INCORRECT
  23. 23. In this, Informal balance is achievedbecause an equal amount of space is filledon either side of a centre line.This does not occur in the incorrectexample.
  24. 24. MERCHANDISEPRESENTATION
  25. 25. The ways goods arehung, placed onshelves, or otherwisemade available tocustomersShoulder-out Only one side showsFace-forward Hanging garment so full front faces viewer
  26. 26. METHODS OF DISPLAY
  27. 27. ShelvingHangingfoldingPeggingDumping
  28. 28. SHELVING HANGING PEGGINGFOLDING DUMPING
  29. 29. DISPLAYED MERCHANDISE  Should be current  Represent styles and lines  Should be well stocked  In demand  New (inform customers of what is available)  Encourage additional purchases  Promote current theme  Look good on display
  30. 30. ELEMENTS INVISUAL MERCHANDISING
  31. 31. ELEMENTSSTORE STORE MERCHANDISEFRONT INTERIOR DISPLAY STORE STORE LAYOUT SPACE
  32. 32. 1. STORE FRONTThe exterior of a business.It includes: 1. Signs 2. Marquee 3. Entrances 4. Window Display
  33. 33. SIGNS There are four different types of signs are:1.Promotional Signs2.Location signs3.Institutional signs4.Informational signs
  34. 34. PROMOTIONAL SIGNSFor off-price events or specials.
  35. 35. LOCATION SIGNSFor direction to specific departments
  36. 36. INSTITUTIONAL SIGNSSigns for the store policies
  37. 37. INFORMATIONAL SIGNSFor product related benefits/features/ prices etc.
  38. 38. MARQUEEThe sign that is used to display the store name
  39. 39. ENTRANCESDesigned with customerconvenience and store security inmind.There are several types ofentrances each portraying a certainimage
  40. 40. TYPES OF ENTRANCESRevolving – up scale storesPush-Pull – full service stores often with fancyhandlesElectronic – Self-serve stores, with carts suchas Wal-Mart, Meijer, Kroger.Climate Controlled – shopping malls.
  41. 41. WINDOW DISPLAYSThe store’s FIRST IMPRESSION with thecustomer.Begin the selling process even before thecustomer enters the store.Suggests the type of merchandise carriedin the store
  42. 42. TYPES OF WINDOW DISPLAYS 1. Promotional – promote the sale of one or more items by using special lighting and /or props. Skiwear with fake snow for accents 2. Institutional – promote store image rather than specific items. Designed to build customer good will, show that the business is interested in the community
  43. 43. STORE INTERIORAffects the store’s imageIncludes items such as: Floor & wall coverings Lighting Colors Fixtures
  44. 44. It is important to create a relaxing,comfortable place for customers to shopCustomers shop longer & are more relaxedand spend more when they are not pressedby crowds, delays & long lines
  45. 45. FLOOR AND WALL COVERINGS
  46. 46. LIGHTINGS
  47. 47. Used to direct customer’s attention to the displayand creates mood.-Use more light for dark colors, less light for lightcolors .-Beam spread; the diameter of the circle of light.
  48. 48. BEAM SPREAD TECHNIQUESFlood lightningSpot lightningPinpointing
  49. 49. FLOOD LIGHTINGCeiling lights to direct lights over an entirewide display area.
  50. 50. SPOT LIGHTING focuses attention on specific areas ortargeted items of merchandise
  51. 51. PINPOINTINGfocuses a narrow beam of light on aspecific item
  52. 52. COLORSColor selection shouldbe perfect.Help to makemerchandise lookmore interesting.Color schemes help tocreate moods.Capture shoppersattention.
  53. 53. Example; in Christmas displays onlycomplementary color scheme i.e. reds and greensare placed next to each other in setting as no otherscheme can accomplish this
  54. 54. STORE FIXTURESTo make store’s wall merchandisable, wall usuallycovered with a skin that is fitted with verticalcolumns of notches.
  55. 55. TYPES OF FIXTURES  Most common types of fixtures:  Stands Platforms and Elevations Round rack Bin T-Stand Four way faceout
  56. 56. STANDSUsed in a varietyor assortmentwindow- fromglass line to theback of the displaywindow
  57. 57. PLATFORMS AND ELEVATIONSPlatforms or Elevations can be tables and otherpieces of furniture that can be used to raise up amannequin, a form or arrangement ofmerchandise
  58. 58. ROUND RACKSCircular racks on which garments are hungaround the entire circumference
  59. 59. BINA rimmed table or bin used to hold sale or specialmerchandise on the sales floor, especially indiscount operations; it has no formal arrangement
  60. 60. T-STANDFreestanding, two-way stand in the shape of a T,that holds clothes on hangers, sometimes with onestraight Arm and one waterfall
  61. 61. FOUR -WAY STANDA fixture with four extended arms, that permitsaccessibility to hanging merchandise all the wayaround
  62. 62. 2. STORE LAYOUT The way the floor space is usedto facilitate and promote sales andbest serve the customer
  63. 63. TYPES OF FLOOR SPACE1. Selling Space2. Merchandising Space3. Personnel Space4. Customer Space
  64. 64. SELLING SPACEIncludes: Interior displays Sales demonstration areas Sales transaction areas (wrap desk)
  65. 65. MERCHANDISE SPACEAllocated to items that are kept ininventory Selling floor Stock room area
  66. 66. PERSONNEL SPACESpace for employees: break rooms lockers restrooms
  67. 67. CUSTOMER SPACEComfort and convenience of customers: Restaurants Dressing rooms Lounges Restrooms Recreation area for childrenStores are competing more & more in theseareasAllocating more dollars and space for customerconvenience than ever before
  68. 68.  Once the floor space has beenallocated, management & visualpersonnel spend a lot of timeplanning the effective use of thespace.
  69. 69. VISUAL DECISIONSWhat product are to go whereAgencies – what products should be nextto each otherWhere to put seasonal merchandise suchas coats, swimwear and Christmas itemsTraffic patterns
  70. 70. FLOOR LAYOUT
  71. 71. STRAIGHT FLOOR LAYOUT ( GRID DESIGN)Best used in retail environments in which majority ofcustomers shop the entire storeCan be confusing and frustrating as it is difficult tosee over the fixtures to other merchandiseForcing customers to back of large store mayfrustrate and cause them to look elsewhereMost familiar examples for supermarkets anddrugstores
  72. 72. DIAGONAL FLOOR LAYOUTGood store layout for self-service type retailstoresOffers excellent visibility for cashier andcustomersMovement and traffic flow in the store issmooth
  73. 73. ANGULAR FLOOR LAYOUT ( CURVING/LOOP –RACETRACK DESIGN)Best used for high-end storesCurves and angles of fixtures and wallsmakes for more expensive store designSoft angles create better traffic flowthroughout the retail store
  74. 74. GEOMETRIC FLOOR LAYOUT (SPINE DESIGN)Is a suitable store design for clothingand apparel shops.Uses racks and fixtures to createinteresting and out- of- the – ordinarytype of store design without a high cost.
  75. 75. MIXED FLOOR LAYOUT (FREE FLOW DESIGN)Incorporates the straight, diagonaland angular plansHelps generates the most functionalstore designLayout moves traffic towards wallsand back of the store
  76. 76. Storage, Receiving, Marketing Underwear Dressing Rooms Tops Accessories Hats and Handbags Checkout counterStockings Clearance Items Tops PantsCasual Wear Skirts and Dresses Feature FeatureJeans Open Display Window Open Display Window
  77. 77. 3. MERCHANDISE DISPLAYSThey are part of the general storeinteriorDisplays generate 1 out of 4 salesThey enable the customer to make aselection without personal assistance
  78. 78. KINDS OF DISPLAYS1. Closed Displays2. Open Displays3. Architectural Display4. Point-of-Purchase5. Store Decorations
  79. 79. CLOSED DISPLAYSLook but don’t touchRequire sales person assistanceExpensive or fragile merchandiseJewellery cases
  80. 80. OPEN DISPLAYHandle merchandise without asalespersonSelf-serviceUsed for most clothing
  81. 81. ARCHITECTURAL DISPLAYSActual room settingFurniture
  82. 82. POINT-OF-PURCHASEPromote impulse buyingItems at the register Batteries Candy Magazines
  83. 83. STORE DECORATIONS Decorations for holidayssuch as Christmas, Halloweenand Valentine’s Day
  84. 84. Interior displays use fixtures andprops to showcase merchandiseProps are generally classified asdecorative or functional
  85. 85. PROPSObjects added that supportthe theme of the display
  86. 86. TYPES OF PROPSFunctional Props - practical items for holdingmerchandise such as mannequins and shirtformsDecorative Props -Only purpose is to enhancemerchandise. Items such as trees, tables, cars.Structural Props -used to support functionaland decorative props and change the physicalmakeup of displays. (boxes, rods, stands,stairways, etc)
  87. 87. FUNCTIONAL PROPS
  88. 88. DECORATIVE PROPS
  89. 89. STRUCTURAL PROPS
  90. 90. IMPORTANCE OF INTERIOR DISPLAYSShow the customer what’s newShow customer how to put together a totallookA good display helps create multiple sales Customers want to look like the display Customers want you to show them what to wear
  91. 91. INTERIOR DISPLAYSOften convey a common themethrough out the store Animal prints, patriotic theme Used to tell a color story
  92. 92. The large display in a store including themannequins & wall displays are usuallyset up by visual departmentSmall table displays and fixture topdisplays are usually set up & maintainedby the individual department staff
  93. 93.  It is important to changedepartmental displaysfrequently
  94. 94. INTERIOR DISPLAY LOCATIONSShould be chosen tomaximize merchandiseexposure Just inside store entrance At entrances to departments Near cash/wrap counter Next to related items By elevators and escalators Open-to-mall areas
  95. 95. WHEN TO CHANGE THE DISPLAYS?
  96. 96. When new merchandise comes inJust to change around the pieces of agroup that has been on the floor forawhile Gives the group a new look
  97. 97. The same customers walkthrough your departmentevery week – you want it tolook freshYou want to give them areason to buy
  98. 98. WHAT TO USE FORSUCCESSFUL DISPLAYS?
  99. 99. MannequinsAlternatives to mannequinsFixturesProps
  100. 100. TYPES OF MANNEQUINSRealisticSemi realisticAbstractSemi-abstractHeadless
  101. 101. REALISTICMANNEQUIN Resembles theeveryday personrather than amovie star.
  102. 102. SEMIREALISTICIs like realisticmannequin,But its makeupis moreDecorative andstylized.
  103. 103. ABSTRACTIs concerned with creating an overall effect ratherthan reproducing natural lines and proportions.Features such as elbows, fingernails are rarelyindicated.
  104. 104. SEMI ABSTRACT Is more stylizedthan the semi-realisticmannequin and itsfeature may bepainted orsuggested ratherthan defined.
  105. 105. HEADLESS:Has a full-size orSemi-realistic bodywith Arms and legsbut no Head.It offers nopersonality orimage.
  106. 106. ALTERNATIVES TO MANNEQUINS Three quarter forms Articulated artist’s figures Dress forms and suit forms Drapers Hangers Lay down techniques Pin up techniques Flying techniques
  107. 107. THREE-QUARTERFORMS:Representation of apart of the Humananatomy, such as theTorso, the bust or thearea from Shoulderto waist or from hipsto ankles.
  108. 108. ARTICULATED ARTIST’S FIGURESbased on small wooden miniatures used byartists and designers to get correct proportionsand poses for figure drawing when live model isnot available
  109. 109. DRESS FORMS AND SUIT FORMS
  110. 110. INFLATABLESAre life-sized“balloons”That stimulateparts of Thehuman anatomy.Most resembles theLower half of thebody And is used toshow jeans andpants.
  111. 111. DRAPERWas a simple,uncomplicatedand oftenunderusedalternative tomannequin
  112. 112. HANGERS Simple hanger can be analternative to themannequin. Hangers caneither be hung by invisiblewire from a ceiling grid orit can be hung from a lookthat extends from a wallor panel.
  113. 113. PINUP TECHNIQUESMakes use of a panel, wall Or some verticalsurface onto which a Garment can bepinned, shaped and Dimensional zed.
  114. 114. LAY-DOWN TECHNIQUE Involves the folding, pleating and placement of garment next to garment or accessories next to featured garment.
  115. 115. FLYING TECHNIQUESmerchandise is pulled, Stretched or pulled thegarment into abstract Shapes that present anangular and crisp presentation.
  116. 116. ATMOSPHERICSThe design of an environment via: visual communications lighting color sound scentTo stimulate customers’ perceptual and emotionalresponses and ultimately influence their purchasebehavior
  117. 117. VISUAL COMMUNICATIONSName, logo and retail identityInstitutional signageDirectional, departmental and category signagePoint-of-Sale (POS) SignageLifestyle Graphics
  118. 118. CONTD…..Coordinate signs and graphics with store’simageInform the customerUse signs and graphics as propsKeep signs and graphics freshLimit sign copyUse appropriate typefaces on signsCreate theatrical effects
  119. 119. SOUND AND SCENTSound Music viewed as valuable marketing tool Often customized to customer demographics - AIE (http://www.aeimusic.com) Can use volume and tempo for crowd controlScent Smell has a large impact on our emotions Victoria Secret, The Magic Kingdom, The Knot Shop Can be administered through time release atomizers or via fragrance-soaked pellets placed on light fixtures
  120. 120. CASE STUDY
  121. 121. Adidas
  122. 122. Adidas• Effectiveness : The display of upside down women signifies the freedom and independency of women which will motivate them to walk in the store.• Why did it work : It forces female customers to ponder what the store holds for them.
  123. 123. Marks & Spencer
  124. 124. Marks & Spencer• Clarity of thought : The window display clearly shows that the sale season is going on for the apparels and accessories offered by the store.• Creativity : The red color is used to indicate sale period which can be discovered from a far distance. Red colour is psychologically attached to the customers; it portrays excitement/ impulse purchase decisions
  125. 125. • Effectiveness : A customer interested would surely walk-in to avail the discounts as the display is shouting out for the sale season.• Why did it work : The entire display used the red color tints and shades indicating sales period & also providing an opportunity to avail extra reduction. The big banners as well as mannequins wearing similar t-shirts talking about sale are also very helpful
  126. 126. CONCLUSIONVisual merchandising is first and foremoststrategic activity.Put your best-selling merchandise in your best-selling space.If you only do one thing with your store, makeit professional.The storefront, tell the right story about whatkind of merchandise is availableInvest proper signage to take your store to thenext level.
  127. 127. BIBLOGRAPHYwww.textilescommittee.nic.inwww.google.comwww.wikipedia.comwww.visualstore.comwww.slideshare.comFashion: from concept to consumer 1999- frings, ginistephenVisual merchandising and display fifth edition – martin
  128. 128. ANYQUESTIONS?
  129. 129. SUBMITTED BY:JASPREET kAURL-2010-HSC-09-BFD

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