History Quiz Finals 2012 Seek under Porus

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KQA History Quiz, Seek under Porus 2012 Finals.

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  • WWII
  • US History, 1800s
  • WWII
  • Portugal, Age of Exploration
  • Egypt, antiquity
  • Japan, US
  • Swiss, France
  • Sikhs, Modern India, Saudi Arabia
  • Medieval Europe, Modern Literature, Salman Rushdie
  • France
  • Britain, paleontology
  • Britain, 1600s
  • 1600s, Britain
  • Ancient Rome
  • Public life, Roman Empire
  • Germany, 1800s
  • Germany, 20th C
  • America, Religion, 1800s
  • Kerala, 1940s
  • India, Freedom Struggle, Gandhi
  • Russia 20th century
  • India, Manipur
  • Soviet Union, Japan
  • Egypt 20th century
  • British India, WWII, Nagaland
  • Germany, classical Latin
  • History Quiz Finals 2012 Seek under Porus

    1. 1. Seek Under PorusFinals of the KQA History Quiz, 4th Edition
    2. 2. Round IMONUMENTS
    3. 3. Written Round• 7 questions, all connected to monuments• Relative scoring. – If 7 teams get a question wrong, +15 for the team that gets it. – If 5 or 6 teams get it wrong, then +10. – If 4 or fewer teams get it wrong, then +5. – For two-part questions, it‟s +7.5, +5, +2.5 for each part .
    4. 4. 1• A memorial in Jersey City, New Jersey, USA.• Which 1940 event from another part of the world is commemorated in this memorial by Andrzej Pityski?
    5. 5. 2.• The replica commemorates a structure immortalized by an 1836 incident. The heroic incident quickly became a rallying cry for revolution. Which event, made famous by many movies and books about the same ?
    6. 6. 3.Memorial honoring members of a particular group. What group ?
    7. 7. 4.• The “Monument to the discoveries” in Lisbon celebrates the Portuguese “Age of Discovery” during the 15th and 16th centuries. The monument includes sculptures of 33 individuals who played a key role in the age of discovery. There are two ramps of 16 statues each, and a central figure at the point where the two ramps meet. Name this central figure who heads others like Vasco Da Gama, Cabral and Magellan. (see next slide..)
    8. 8. 5.• In which Egyptian town would you see this monument ?
    9. 9. 6.• The Manzanar site, where the monument shown is located, is probably the most famous of the ten such locations in the United States. What purpose did these sites serve ?
    10. 10. 7• The picture shows the storming of a famous palace. What monument commemorates the foreign guards who died defending the members of the palace ?
    11. 11. • Exchange Papers!
    12. 12. 1• A memorial in Jersey City, New Jersey, USA.• Which 1940 event from another part of the world is commemorated in this memorial by Andrzej Pityski?
    13. 13. • Answer…
    14. 14. • Katyn massacre.
    15. 15. 2.• The replica commemorates a structure immortalized by an 1836 incident. The heroic incident quickly became a rallying cry for revolution. Which event, made famous by many movies and books about the same ?
    16. 16. • Answer…
    17. 17. • Battle of the Alamo.• The Alamo Mission in Texas was overrun by Mexican forces. The siege and the battle inspired many Texans to join the revolution against Mexico.
    18. 18. 3.Memorial honoring members of a particular group. What group ?
    19. 19. • Answer…
    20. 20. The Dambusters.
    21. 21. 4.• The “Monument to the discoveries” in Lisbon celebrates the Portuguese “Age of Discovery” during the 15th and 16th centuries. The monument includes sculptures of 33 individuals who played a key role in the age of discovery. There are two ramps of 16 statues each, and a central figure at the point where the two ramps meet. Name this central figure who heads others like Vasco Da Gama, Cabral and Magellan. (see next slide..)
    22. 22. • Answer…
    23. 23. • Henry the Navigator.
    24. 24. 5.• In which Egyptian town would you see this monument ?
    25. 25. • Answer…
    26. 26. • Rosetta/Rashid, Egypt.
    27. 27. 6.• The Manzanar site, where the monument shown is located, is probably the most famous of the ten such locations in the United States. What purpose did these sites serve ?
    28. 28. • Answer…
    29. 29. • Internment camps for Japanese Americans during WWII.
    30. 30. 7• The picture shows the storming of a famous palace. What monument commemorates the foreign guards who died defending the members of the palace ?
    31. 31. • Answer…
    32. 32. • The Lion of Lucerne• The memorial pays tribute to the fallen Swiss guards who died defending the Tuileries Palace, from the storming during the French Revolution.
    33. 33. Round II Clockwise 16 + 4 questi0ns +10 /-5 on pounce
    34. 34. 1 Some time after March 4th 1966, Nichols Roy, anMLA of ASSAM went to a then district in thestate. He went there to see the aftermath of anevent denied by the PMO. He wanted to sendthese things <pic> to Delhi and ask the PrimeMinister, How do you cook this ration? If theseare supplies, please tell us how you cook thesethings?“ What event are we talking about?
    35. 35. • Answer follows…..
    36. 36. • These were the shells dropped by the IAF in Aizwal 1966 to take back the city from Mizo National Front
    37. 37. 2During the 7th and 8th centuries the Islamic armies werethreatening to conquer Europe. During this timeUmayyads fought a series of wars with a state which wasthe first feudal state in Eastern Europe. They acted asbuffer state between Christians and Muslims and helpedto block the westward spread of Islam. Later, theyconverted en masse to Judaism. To this day Caspian Sea isknown after them in many Middle Eastern languages. In1976, Arthur Koestler controversially claimed in his book"The Thirteenth Tribe" that Ashkenazi Jews are notdescended from the Israelites of antiquity but from thispeople. Who?
    38. 38. • Answer
    39. 39. • Khazars
    40. 40. 3• In 1509 a Portuguese fleet attacked and defeated the combined naval forces of the Muslim ruler of Gujarat, the Zamorin of Calicut with support of Ottomans and the Mameluke Sultan of Egypt, the Republic of Venice and the Republic of Ragusa.Commenting on the battle after winning it, Portuguese viceroy Francisco de Almeida said: "As long as you may be powerful at sea, you will hold India as yours; and if you do not possess this power, little will avail you a fortress on the shore". How do we know this decisive engagement?
    41. 41. • Answer
    42. 42. • Battle of Diu
    43. 43. 4Their Ottoman Sunni rivals called them red heads. TheseShias warriors believed in the divinity of their leaders andwould go into battle without armor as an expression offaith in divine protection. They played a big role in thefoundation of the Safavid dynasty of Iran andaccompanied Humayun from Iran to reconquer hisempire from the Suri Dynasty. Thereafter these tribes canbe found in sub-continent and one of their descendentswent on to become a dictator. Name this community andthe dictator. <pic>
    44. 44. • The answer
    45. 45. • Qizilbash and Agha Mohammad Yahya Khan Qizilbash of Pakistan.
    46. 46. 5 The original was destroyed by King Pusyamitra inthe 2nd century BC and the replacement wasdestroyed by King Shasanka at the beginning ofthe 7th century AD. The one seen at the site wasnurtured by the British archaeologist AlexanderCunningham after the previous one had died ofold age a few years before. What?
    47. 47. • The answer
    48. 48. • The Mahabodhi Tree at Bodh Gaya
    49. 49. 6• Kuldip Singh Brar is a retired Indian Army officer, who commanded the highly controversial Operation Blue Star. He compared this operation to an earlier military action conducted under similar circumstances when hundreds of pilgrims were taken hostage. The ensuing battles for control of the site resulted in the death of hundreds of people. What was he referring to?
    50. 50. The Answer is….
    51. 51. • Grand Mosque Seizure on November 20 1979
    52. 52. 7It literally means "a knot" and this stems from thepractice of binding inscribed palm leaves using alength of thread held by knots. This script waswidely used to write Sanskrit in the Tamil-speakingparts of South Asia until the 19th century. Scholarsbelieve that it was the script used when the Vedaswere first put into writing around the 5th centuryCE. Malayalam script is a direct descendent of thisscript and scripts such asMon, Lao, Javanese, Khmer and Thai are eitherdirect or indirect derivations. What?
    53. 53. • The answer
    54. 54. • Grantha Script
    55. 55. 8Around the time when Akbar was formulating his syncretic, regi-centric creed Din Ilahi he read the khutbah at Jama Masjid, on 26thJune 1579, a Friday which also happened to the birth anniversary ofProphet Muhammad. Even though there was nothing unusual about anEmperor reading the khutbah, the hardliner cleric community saw thisas an encroachment into their hallowed territory and the ambiguousphrase used by the Emperor to end his speech created havoc amongthem. Which common enough Arabic invocation did Akbar use?
    56. 56. The answer is….
    57. 57. • Allahu Akbar! The phrase means God is Great. Since akbar is Arabic for great, the cleric saw this as Akbar‟s self proclamation as the God
    58. 58. 9This name appears in various medieval mysteryplays, in which this character is sometimesportrayed as a generic "pagan" god worshipped byvillains such as Herod and the Pharaoh of theExodus. This character originates from the factthat medieval Europeans believed that this personwas the God rather than the prophet. The namewas used by Robert Burns and G.K. Chestertonin their works but more famously/notoriously bysomebody else. What name? Be specific
    59. 59. The Answer is….
    60. 60. Mahound, the term which hounds SalmanRushdie.
    61. 61. 10 Muhammad Hamidullah is a sort of Dr.Ambedkar for Pakistan as he helped them drafttheir constitution. He is also remembered for hisFrench translation of Quran. Even though helived in Paris for a long time he never took theFrench citizenship. French classified him as arefugee and he remained the last citizen of hiserstwhile state which was annexed when he andhe colleagues had gone to the UN. Where washe from?
    62. 62. • The answer
    63. 63. • Hyderabad
    64. 64. 11He called it "the interpretation of a friendly mleccha”and was slightly embarrassed about its florid title. Heused to blame Edgar Allan Poes poem "To Helen" forinspiring it. The relevant part of the poem went like this:“On desperate seas long wont to roam,Thy hyacinth hair, thy classic face,Thy Naiad airs have brought me homeTo the glory that was Greece,And the grandeur that was Rome.”What are we talking about?
    65. 65. • The answer
    66. 66. • The Wonder that was India by A L Basham
    67. 67. 12It was founded in 1905 by a group led by W. E. B.Du Bois and William Monroe Trotter. It was namedfor the "mighty current" of change the group wantedto effect and the place where the first meeting tookplace in July 1905. It was mainly opposed to policiesof accommodation and conciliation promoted byanother famous Af-Am leader which Du Bois calledthe Atlanta compromise. What was the name ofgroup <pic> and who was the leader whosecompromising position they were against?
    68. 68. • The answer
    69. 69. The Niagra Movement and the other blackleader was Booker T Washington
    70. 70. 13Erroneously attributed to Lenin, it is a pejorativeterm used to describe people perceived aspropagandists for a cause whose goals they do notunderstand, who are used cynically by the leaders ofthe cause. The term was originally used to describeSoviet sympathizers in Western countries. A 2010BBC radio documentary lists among _____ ______of Joseph Stalin several prominent writers andartists including H. G. Wells, Doris Lessing, GeorgeBernard Shaw, Paul Robeson. What term?
    71. 71. • The answer
    72. 72. Useful Idiot
    73. 73. 14Duke Yansheng was a title of nobility in China.Their fiefdom had its own court of law and thepower of capital punishment. After the republicanrevolution, when the dukes lost theirprivileges, Duke Yansheng was the only title ofChinese nobility which was retained. In 1935 thetitle was changed but it still exists as an office of theRepublic of China and until 2008 was ranked andcompensated as a cabinet minister. Who is DukeYansheng really?
    74. 74. • The answer
    75. 75. • A direct descendant of Confucious
    76. 76. 15This word which means side, section, tent ordirection translated as "camp" or "palace, tent".It is also used for an historical sociopolitical andmilitary structure found on the Eurasian Steppe.An English derogatory term meaning a largegroup is derived from this term. What term?<pic>
    77. 77. • The answer
    78. 78. • The Horde.
    79. 79. 16The whole argument started when the father in arage went and beat his pregnant daughter-in-lawfor wearing immodest clothing. Upon hearingthis, his son engaged in a heated argument withhis father which culminated in the fathermortally striking his son in the head with hispointed staff and killing him. A pivotal momentin the history of a country. Who was the father?
    80. 80. • The answer
    81. 81. Ivan the terrible
    82. 82. ROUND III Theme 16 + 4 questi0ns +10 /-5 on pounce
    83. 83. • 8 questions• Questions 1,2 +30/-15• Questions 3,4 +20/-10• Questions 5,6 +15/-7.5• Questions 7,8 +10/-5
    84. 84. (1) +30/-15Cōdex Rēgius is an Icelandic manuscript inwhich the Poetic Edda is preserved. In 2009Harper Collins published a work composed in1920s and 1930s. It was composed in a form ofalliterative verse inspired by the traditionalpoetry of the Poetic Edda. The book waspublished posthumously and was edited byauthors son. Who was the Author?
    85. 85. The Answer is….
    86. 86. The author was J.R.R. Tolkien and the book was The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún.Link to theme  Cōdex Rēgius
    87. 87. (2) +30/-15This 1,700-year-old, 24-metres tall thing,weighing 160 tonnes, is named after an ancientkingdom (100-940 CE) which was a major playerin the commerce between the Roman Empireand Ancient India. In the 7th century theMuslims facing persecution traveled to thiscountry, a journey famous in Islamic history asthe First Hijra. What object?
    88. 88. The Answer is….
    89. 89. +30/-15• Obelisk of Axum
    90. 90. • Attempts for theme? (+30/-15)
    91. 91. (3) +25/-10While marching in front of Il Duce and Hitler inthe 4th anniversary celebrations of the Italianempire, an Ethiopian soldier Zerai Deres saw asymbol of ancient Ethiopian monarchy beingexhibited as war booty in Rome. On anadrenaline rush he slaughtered some Italians andbecame a martyr. What inspired Zerai Deres?<pic>
    92. 92. The Answer is….
    93. 93. Lion of Judah
    94. 94. (4) +25/-10 His wealth was legendary and is credited withissuing the first true gold coins for generalcirculation. He is known as Qarun in MiddleEast and is mentioned in the Quran. And inPersian mythology the Karun treasure is saidto be in perpetual motion under the ground.The phrase “harta karun” in the Malay languagesynonymous with the term buried treasure. Howdo we know him?
    95. 95. The Answer is….
    96. 96. • King Croseus of Lydia
    97. 97. • Attempts for theme? (+25/-10)
    98. 98. (5) +20/-7.5King Edwards Chair or The CoronationChair, is the throne on which the Britishmonarch sits for the coronation. It wascommissioned in 1296 by King Edward toaccommodate a spoil of war which he capturedfrom Scotland. The artifact was a symbol ofScottish monarchs and has been traditionallyused for their coronation. What? <see pic>
    99. 99. The Answer is….
    100. 100. The Stone of Scone
    101. 101. (6) +20/-7.5 Szczerbiec is the only preserved piece ofPolish Crown Jewels. It was used in thecoronation of the kings of Poland from 1320 to1764. The name means "the Notched Sword" or"the Jagged Sword". It got it‟s name when KingBoleslaus the Brave chipped it by hitting itagainst a historic gateway in the ancient cityfortress during his capture of the city in 1018. Idthe landmark
    102. 102. The Answer is….
    103. 103. • The Golden Gate of Kiev
    104. 104. • Attempts for theme? (+20/-7.5)
    105. 105. 7• The pic (next slide) shows an object being protected by guards at the Agra Fort. The object was brought to the Fort by the British Army with great fanfare in the 1840s. A vigorous debate had happened in the House of Commons before this decision was taken. Later, controversy erupted when this was found to be fake. What object?
    106. 106. • Answer…
    107. 107. • The Gates of Somnath Temple.
    108. 108. 8.• The object in question is said to have been lost in a war with the Nairs of Travancore during the Battle of the Nedumkotta. The Nair army under the leadership of Raja Kesavadas again defeated the army near Aluva. The Maharaja, Dharma Raja, gifted the object to the Nawab of Arcot, from where it went to London. It returned to India two centuries later. What?
    109. 109. The Answer is….
    110. 110. • Sword of Tipu.
    111. 111. • Attempts for theme? (+10/5)
    112. 112. Theme: Repatriated Cultural Artifacts
    113. 113. Connections• Codex Regius - under the possession of Denmark from 1662 it was returned to Iceland in 1985• Obelisk of Axum - looted away to Italy by the Mussolini‟s forces and returned to Ethiopia in 2004• The Lion of Judah was repatriated to Ethiopia in the 1960‟s• The Karun Treasure - repatriated to Turkey from the Met Museum, NY• The Stone of Scone - returned to Scotland by the British Govt. in 1996• The Soviet Union returned Szczerbiec to Poland in 1928. During World War II, the Szczerbiec was evacuated to Canada and did not return to Kraków until 1959.• The Gates of Somnath were supposedly repatriated by the British• The Sword of Tipu was repatriated when Vijay Mallya bought it at an auction in 2004.
    114. 114. Round IV Anti Clockwise 16 + 4 questi0ns +10 /-5 on pounce
    115. 115. 1. Venue of what famous event ?
    116. 116. • Answer…
    117. 117. • Oath of the Tennis Court, taken at “jeu de paume” in Versailles. The painting in the background is:
    118. 118. 2• The painting features a lady, considered to be among the most important paleontologists of her time. Her family owned a small shop in the coastal town of Lyme Regis in Dorset, where they sold "curios" or fossils collected from the region. At the age of 12, one of her fossil hunts resulted in the discovery of the first complete ichthyosaur fossil. At a time when people believed in the Biblical origin of the world, a pre-historic fossil generated considerable interest. Later she found the first complete Plesiosaurus skeleton, and in 1828 the first British example of the flying reptiles known as pterosaurs. This working class woman soon became a consultant for continental paleontologists and geologists.• Interestingly, she is also believed to have inspired a famous rhyme by Terry Sullivan in 1908.• Name her and the lines she inspired. <pic>
    119. 119. • Answer…
    120. 120. • Mary Anning.• “She sells seashells by the seashore..”
    121. 121. 3• The items shown in the picture (Pic 1) were bequeathed to the Magdalene College, Cambridge. The writing was in shorthand (a sample is given in Pic 2) and could not be understood. Nearly 150 years after they were written, the task of translating them was taken up Rev. John Smith, who was unaware that the author had left a key in his library. He went on to produce a readable version of the work. What unusual and illuminating work are we talking about ?
    122. 122. • Answer…
    123. 123. • The Diary of Samuel Pepys
    124. 124. 4• In several European languages, these structures are known after the Roman Emperor Vespacian. These structures were used to sell a material useful in tanning. Launderers also needed the material as a source of ammonia to clean and whiten woollen togas. Vespacian, in a bid to improve tax revenue, instituted a tax on the buyers of this product. Sections of society were outraged at this, but Vespacian is said to have brushed them aside with the statement "Pecunia non olet". What structures?
    125. 125. • Answer…
    126. 126. • Public toilets are called vespasiennes in France and vespasiani in Italy. The Emperor defended his “urine tax” with the statement “Money doesn’t smell.”
    127. 127. 5• On 13 July 1870 King Wilhelm I of Prussia, on his morning stroll, was waylaid by Count Vincent Benedetti, the French ambassador to Prussia. Benedetti presented the French demand that the King should guarantee that he would never again permit the candidacy of a Prussian prince to the Spanish throne. The King politely refused to commit and the two departed on good terms.• When a report of this meeting reached Bismarck, he released it to the media with some modifications. He sharpened the language of the report to give the French the impression that King Wilhelm I had insulted Count Benedetti; likewise, the Germans interpreted it as the Count insulting the King.• By what name is this report, that precipitated the Franco-Prussian war of 1870, known as ?
    128. 128. • Answer…
    129. 129. • Ems Dispatch/ Ems Telegram.
    130. 130. 6 The “This is the place” memorial pays tribute to an epic migration that happened in the 19th century. The leader of the migrants is said to have exclaimed “This is the place!” when the group entered this valley. What group?(visual on next slide)
    131. 131. • Answer…
    132. 132. • Mormons, migrating to the Salt Lake Valley in Utah, after encountering stiff opposition in their original settlement in the mid-west.• “This is the place” monument pays tribute to Brigham Young who led the Mormons into Utah.
    133. 133. 7.• The picture represents a concept used by a movement in the 1930s in their campaign. The movement achieved its objective in the mid- 1950s. What was the name given to this image ? OR What was the movement about ?
    134. 134. • Answer…
    135. 135. • The symbol was called “Kerala Mathavu” or “Mother Kerala”. It was used by the Aikya Kerala Movement campaigning for the integration of Travancore, Cochin and Malabar regions into one state along linguistic lines.
    136. 136. 8 Genizah is the store-room or depository in aJewish synagogue used specifically for worn-outHebrew-language books and papers on religioustopics. The Cairo Geniza, which was discoveredin 1864, had an accumulation of almost 280,000Jewish manuscript fragments, which werewritten from about 870 AD to the 19th centurywhich is currently studied by scholars. Why doJews store documents in a Genizah? <pic>
    137. 137. • Answer…
    138. 138. According to Jewish tradition, it is forbidden tothrow away writings containing the name ofGod as they should be given a proper cemeteryburial
    139. 139. 9"...........Nobody would be more happy than ourselves if by any chance ourcountrymen at home should succeed in liberating themselves through their ownefforts or by any chance, the British Government accepts your `Quit Indiaresolution and gives effect to it. We are, however proceeding on the assumptionthat neither of the above is possible and that a struggle is inevitable.___________ in this holy war for Indias liberation, we ask for your blessingsand good wishes".This was a message intended for Mahatma Gandhi, who wasimprisoned in the Aga Khan Palace, Pune. What words have beenblanked out?
    140. 140. • Answer…
    141. 141. • “Father of our Nation”.• The message, sent by Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose through Azad Hind Radio in Rangoon, is considered to be the first usage of the title to address Mahatma Gandhi.
    142. 142. • 10. Every year, Fabergé used to present the Tsar with an Imperial Easter egg. The one shown in picture was presented in 1900 to commemorate one of the best achievements of the Tsar. Etched on a belt of silver encircling the egg is a map with some points marked in precious stones (see better image next slide).• What did the map represent ?
    143. 143. map
    144. 144. • Answer…
    145. 145. • The map of the Trans-Siberian Railway with it‟s major stations represented using precious stones.
    146. 146. 11• Very little is known about this man, apart from the fact that he was a skilled cannon maker. He originally approached an empire and offered his services, but they were unable to provide him with enough funds. So, he went over to another empire that was plotting to conquer the first one. When asked if he could cast a cannon to project a stone ball large enough to smash the walls at _______, he replied “I can cast a cannon of bronze with the capacity of the stone you want. I have examined the walls of the city in great detail. I can shatter to dust not only these walls with the stones from my gun, but the very walls of Babylon itself„”.• He proved true to his word and his weapons were key ingredients of the conquest. He himself was killed when one of his weapons exploded. Name him and the city that he helped to capture.
    147. 147. • The answer is ….
    148. 148. • Orban.• He made the cannons for Sultan Mehmed II to use during the siege of Constantinople.
    149. 149. • 12. The two “dragons” seen below are part of the national emblem for a particular ethnic group. They used to stand on either side of the path leading to the ancestral coronation hall of the Kings of the region. In 1891, the British captured the Kingdom and destroyed the two statues. Name them, as well as the ethnic group.
    150. 150. • Answer…
    151. 151. • “Kangla Sha” or “Kangla dragons” who stood guard in front of the Kangla Fort. They were destroyed in the Anglo-Manipur war of 1891, but were recently rebuilt.• The ethnic group are the “Meitei” people. (“Manipuri” is not accepted).
    152. 152. 13• In 1961, a French movie titled “Who are you Mr. ____ ?” became popular in the Soviet Union. Nikita Khruschev happened to see the film and asked his intelligence agencies to confirm if the story was true. When they reported that it was accurate, Khruschev decided to confer the Hero of the Soviet Union award to the man, who had died in 1944. Who?
    153. 153. • Answer…
    154. 154. • Richard Sorge, a Soviet spy in Tokyo who provided crucial intelligence to the Soviets. He was discovered in 1943 and the Japanese offered to trade him to the Soviets in exchange for one of their own agents. But the Soviets denied any knowledge of him, leading to his execution.
    155. 155. 14. Identify this ruler seen here examining his rare coin collection. Heowned one of the largest and best known collections in history. In the1950s, a “fire sale” of his collection was conducted and the event is nowpart of numismatic folklore.
    156. 156. • Answer…
    157. 157. • King Farouk of Egypt.
    158. 158. 15. • In 1945, “True Comics”, an American publication featured a cartoon called “Jungle Queen”. The heroine was based on a real life person who had fought for the British. This remarkable person was the only woman to command a guerilla force in the British army during WWII. Name this lady who was awarded an MBE for her services. Also, what force did she command?
    159. 159. • Answer…
    160. 160. • Ursula Graham Bower.• She commanded a force of Naga tribes against the Japanese invasion during the Battle of Kohima.• She had originally come to India as an anthropologist, studying the North Eastern tribes, but ended up fighting a war with them!
    161. 161. 16• “Modern readers have often wished that more classical texts could have survived the Dark Ages, but the _____ may be the rare exception. If the last surviving manuscript had been eaten by rats in a monks library a thousand years ago, the world might have been better off.” -- from a 2011 article in Slate magazine• The classical work being described, is a short ethnographic work written in 98 A.D. It was considered as lost during the Middle Ages. Miraculously, in 1455, a copy was discovered in the Benedictine monastery of Hersfeld Abbey. Name this book and its author.
    162. 162. • Answer…
    163. 163. • Germania by Tacitus.• Tacitus had described the Germanic tribes as tall, proud, virtuous and ferocious warriors. He also stated that they were “not tainted by intermarriage with any other nations” but rather existed “as a distinct unadulterated people that resembles only itself.”• Following it‟s rediscovery, it became something of a Bible for German nationalism, with rather undesirable consequences.
    164. 164. Hybrid Round
    165. 165. • Part Infinite Bounce/Pounce and part written• All the “X”a numbered questions will be written, 10 points each• Bonus of 10 for getting all written questions correct• All “X” numbered question will be on Infinite Bounce/Pounce• +10/-5 on Pounce
    166. 166. 1It was founded on July 6, 1917 to honor the life andwork of a scholar who was long regarded as thefounder of Indology in India. In 2007, Rigvedamanuscripts preserved at the Institute, was includedin UNESCO‟S, Memory of the World Register. Theinstitute also undertook a project to create a CriticalEdition of Mahabharata in 1919 and completed itin 1966. The Critical Edition was collated from1,259 manuscripts and comes in 19 volumes. WhichInstitute?
    167. 167. • The answer is…
    168. 168. • The BORI or the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, Pune.
    169. 169. 1a• The institute was vandalized in 2003 by Sambhaji Brigade which went on a rampage and destroyed thousands of rare manuscripts and other priceless articles at the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute to protest alleged "disparaging" remarks made against Chhatrapati Shivaji by the a British historian in his book. The book is not available in India ever since. Which book/Author?
    170. 170. 2 X wrote this novel as response to Turgenevs Fathersand Sons. The novels hero furnished a blueprint forthe asceticism and dedication unto death and was aninspiration to many later Russian revolutionaries. Thenovel is famous for the responses it created, Leninclaimed to have read it five times and named hisfamous pamphlet after it. It was this pamphlet whichargued for the need for a "Vanguard Party" andeventually caused the split of RSDLP into Bolsheviksand Mensheviks. Leo Tolstoy also wrote a non-fictionwork in more or less the same name on moralresponsibility.
    171. 171. • 2A: Who is X?• 2B: What name derived from Luke 3:10-14 is shared by Xs novel, Lenins pamphlet and Tolstoys non-fiction work?
    172. 172. • The answer is…
    173. 173. • 2A: Nikolai Chernyshevsky• 2B : What is to be done?
    174. 174. 2a• In response yet another Russian writer, Y wrote a novel, a scathing criticism of the Utopian Socialism as trumpeted in Xs novel. Written in the form of rambling memoirs of a bitter, isolated, unnamed narrator generally referred to by critics as the Underground Man, this novel is considered by many as the first existentialist novel.
    175. 175. • 3 This memorial to a tragic episode of the 1840s and 1850s represents immigrants heading towards ships to escape the disaster at home. What unfortunate event ? (Part 2 of this question on next slide.)
    176. 176. • The answer is…
    177. 177. • The Irish Potato Famine / Great Famine. The memorial is in Dublin.
    178. 178. 3a• In the 1990s, several people from this country retraced a 500 mile trail from Oklahoma to the Mississippi. The trail had nothing to do with their country‟s history, and had been originally traversed by another group of unfortunate people in the 1830s. Why was this retracing done ?
    179. 179. 4In the 1960s the building was subdivided andpartitioned into smaller cubicles that were let out onrent as homes and offices. It is oldest surviving castiron building in India was designed by the samedesigner who did the St Pancras Railway station.The present sad state of affairs was publicized byItalian architect Renzo Piano, and as a result of hisefforts, the building was listed in June 2005 on thelist of "100 World Endangered Monuments" by theWorld Monuments Fund. This building iscounterpart of another building in a famous urbanlegend. What building?
    180. 180. • The answer is….
    181. 181. • Watson Hotel Bombay
    182. 182. 4a• It is also known as "More Tramps Abroad" and was primarily a travelogue but also contained tall tales like how Cecil Rhodes made his fortune by finding a newspaper in the belly of a shark, and the story of how a man named Ed Jackson made good in life out of a fake letter of introduction to Cornelius Vanderbilt. Which work?
    183. 183. 5 It was a classification created by Army officialsof British India. It has been alleged that PakistanMilitary believed in this concept and they thusthought that they would easily defeat India in awar. It was popularly hyped that one Pakistanisoldier was equal to four to ten Indian soldiers.What theory?
    184. 184. • The answer is…
    185. 185. • Martial Race Theory
    186. 186. 5a The Nairs of Kerala were initially included inthis list but after a 1807-09 event they wereremoved and thereafter was recruited in smallernumbers. This event was insurrection led byPrime Minister of a kingdom which was the firstnative force to defeat a colonial power in Asia.Who was he?
    187. 187. 6 He was an expert in Pali language and Buddhistphilosophy, one of the very few during hislifetime..But his greatest contribution was to therevival and spread of the message of Buddhism inMaharashtra. It was his primer Buddha, Dharma aniSangha (1910) and his play Bodhisattva, publishedposthumously in 1949, prepared the ground for theeventual popularization of Ambedkar‟s Navayana inMaharashtra in the late 1950s. ID <pic>
    188. 188. • The answer is….
    189. 189. • Dharmananda Damodar Kosambi
    190. 190. 6a His son Damodar Dharmananda Kosambi was arenaissance man. He was amathematician, statistician, Marxist historian, and apolymath. His 1956 book An Introduction to the Studyof Indian History is an epoch making work in the field. This is an excerpt from the book. Fill up. “Heavy, dark, sluggish, hardy, fertile, productive withlittle care, far cleaner than it looks, docile enough to beled by a child, but suspicious of innovations and perfectlycapable when roused, of charging a tiger or alocomotive, the ________ would be a fitting nationalsymbol for India”.
    191. 191. 7 The structure was build to provide famine relief.It is said that both rich and poor worked on it.But at different times. The poor worked duringthe day and rich during the night. The result wasthat there was no coordination between the two.What the rich did during the day, the poor undidit at night. Corridors ran over corridors. Someended where they had begun. Some got lost inbetween. Which structure? Its name suggeststhe lack of co-ordination was intentional.
    192. 192. • Bhul-bhulaiyan of Lucknow
    193. 193. 7a• This mausoleum, popularly known as Bhul- bhulaiyan, due to a labyrinthine maze inside. It was built by Akbar for his foster brother Adham Khan, whom he killed by throwing him down from the ramparts of the Agra fort, twice. The same Adham Khan was responsible for the end of a tragic love jihad story through his invasion of the state of Malwa. Which love story?
    194. 194. 8The picture below is propaganda poster of sortswhich was commissioned in early 1600‟s. Itshows the diplomatic relationship between twoempires and their relative strengths. Identifyboth the emperors.
    195. 195. The answer is…
    196. 196. • Shah Abbas of Safavid Persia and Jahangir of Mughal India.
    197. 197. 8a• Babur, the founder of the Mughal Empire, annexed it in the 16th century. Baburs son, Humayun, lost it to the Shia Safavids of Persia. The Mughals gained he city in 1595 and resisted a Persian siege in 1605–1606. Humayuns son, Akbar, regained control in 1638 but lost the city permanently to the Safavid Persians during the 1649-53 Mughal–Safavid War. Which city?
    198. 198. ANSWERS, WRITTEN PART
    199. 199. 1a• The institute was vandalized in 2003 by Sambhaji Brigade which went on a rampage and destroyed thousands of rare manuscripts and other priceless articles at the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute to protest alleged "disparaging" remarks made against Chhatrapati Shivaji by the a British historian in his book. The book is not available in India ever since. Which book/Author?
    200. 200. James W. Lane/`Shivaji: Hindu King in Islamic India„
    201. 201. 2a• In response yet another Russian writer, Y wrote a novel, a scathing criticism of the Utopian Socialism as trumpeted in Xs novel. Written in the form of rambling memoirs of a bitter, isolated, unnamed narrator generally referred to by critics as the Underground Man, this novel is considered by many as the first existentialist novel.
    202. 202. • Fyodor Dostoyevsky‟s Notes from the Underground
    203. 203. 3a• In the 1990s, several people from this country retraced a 500 mile trail from Oklahoma to the Mississippi. The trail had nothing to do with their country‟s history, and had been originally traversed by another group of unfortunate people in the 1830s. Why was this retracing done ?
    204. 204. • In 1847, at the height of the famine, the Irish nation received a gift of $710 from the Choctaw Indians of USA. The contribution was sent at a time when the Choctaw themselves were struggling. About 16 years earlier, this tribe had been forced by the US Govt., to relocate from their homeland to new reservations. Their journey came to be known as the “Choctaw Trail of Tears”. Moved by the plight of the Irish, the Choctaw collected money and send it to a famine relief fund.. This gift was remembered on its 150th anniversary by Irishmen who retraced the trail of tears.
    205. 205. 4a• It is also known as "More Tramps Abroad" and was primarily a travelogue but also contained tall tales like how Cecil Rhodes made his fortune by finding a newspaper in the belly of a shark, and the story of how a man named Ed Jackson made good in life out of a fake letter of introduction to Cornelius Vanderbilt. Which work?
    206. 206. • Mark Twain‟s Following the Equator
    207. 207. 5a The Nairs of Kerala were initially included inthis list but after a 1807-09 event they wereremoved and thereafter was recruited in smallernumbers. This event was insurrection led byPrime Minister of a kingdom which was the firstnative force to defeat a colonial power in Asia.Who was he?
    208. 208. • Velu Thampi Dalawa
    209. 209. 6a His son Damodar Dharmananda Kosambi was a renaissance man. He was a mathematician, statistician, Marxist historian, and a polymath. His 1956 book An Introduction to the Study of Indian History is an epoch making work in the field. This is an excerpt from the book. Fill up.• “Heavy, dark, sluggish, hardy, fertile, productive with little care, far cleaner than it looks, docile enough to be led by a child, but suspicious of innovations and perfectly capable when roused, of charging a tiger or a locomotive, the ________ would be a fitting national symbol for India”.
    210. 210. • The Buffalo
    211. 211. 7a• This mausoleum, popularly known as Bhul- bhulaiyan, due to a labyrinthine maze inside. It was built by Akbar for his foster brother Adham Khan, whom he killed by throwing him down from the ramparts of the Agra fort, twice. The same Adham Khan was responsible for the end of a tragic love jihad story through his invasion of the state of Malwa. Which love story?
    212. 212. • Baz Bahadur-Rani Roopmati
    213. 213. This is the end….
    214. 214. • Comments can be mailed to: praveen.vr@gmail.com kmanjith@yahoo.com

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