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Value Engineering and Value Analysis
Made By:- Prathamesh Kadam
Siraj Ansari
Rohit Tiwari
Introduction to value Engineering and Value Analysis
What is Value?
Value can be defined as the combination of quality ,ef...
Types of values
Cost Value
Use Value
Esteem Value
Exchange Value
Cost Value
• It is the cost of manufacturing a product or component. It is sum of all
Costs such as raw material cost, lab...
Esteem value
Itisproperties,features,attractiveness,qualities,fancy,packagingetc,whi
ch increases sales appeal, or which a...
Value anaylysis
• Value Analysis is organized procedure for efficient identification of
unnecessary cost associated with m...
Value Engineering
• Value Engineering is a systematic effort to improve the valueof a
product,project or system and optimi...
Importance of value engineering and value
analysis
• Value engineering
• Value Engineering (VE) is concerned with new prod...
• This is very significant, because according to many reports, up to 80% of a
product’s costs (throughout the rest of its ...
Value analysis
• Value Analysis (VA) is concerned with existing products. It involves a
current product being analysed and...
Difference between value analysis ane Value
engineering
Value Analysis Value Engineering
Value analysis is the application...
Steps for value analysis
• 1: orientation/preparation
• Identify what is to be analysed. This will typically be one of:
• ...
• 3: analysis
• In this phase the functions of the product are analysed by Functional Analysis, which is aimed at
identify...
• It represents a confrontation of ideas, a collection of information about the feasibility and cost of those ideas, and m...
Steps for value engineering
• Information gathering - This asks what the requirements are for the object.
Function analysi...
Techniques of value engineering and value
analysis
• Obtain all available cost
• Evaluate function by comparision
• Seek i...
Check list
• A checklist is a type of informational job aid used to reduce failure by
compensating for potential limits of...
• The following list of issues should be considered during this stage:
• A. Material Specification and Content
• 1. What m...
• C. Standardization
• 1. Is the component made from the standard raw material
• 2. Is the component standard
• 3. Can the...
Advantage
• Reduce cost of product
• Most suitable products are manufactured
• It helps emplooyess in better understanding...
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Introduction to value engineering and value analysis

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Value Engineering and Value Analysis of a product helps us to eliminate unnecessary cost of product which comes due to aesthetics.

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Introduction to value engineering and value analysis

  1. 1. Value Engineering and Value Analysis Made By:- Prathamesh Kadam Siraj Ansari Rohit Tiwari
  2. 2. Introduction to value Engineering and Value Analysis What is Value? Value can be defined as the combination of quality ,efficiency, price And service which ensures the ultimate economy and satisfaction of the purchaser Value can be expressed in mathematical way, Value=[Function(or utility)/cost]=[Worth to you/Price you pay]
  3. 3. Types of values Cost Value Use Value Esteem Value Exchange Value
  4. 4. Cost Value • It is the cost of manufacturing a product or component. It is sum of all Costs such as raw material cost, labour cost, tool cost to produce the product. What is Use Value? It means the work done ,performed or service rendered by a product. It is the measure of properties, qualities and features which make the Product to accomplish a use, work, or service.
  5. 5. Esteem value Itisproperties,features,attractiveness,qualities,fancy,packagingetc,whi ch increases sales appeal, or which attracts person and creates desire to posses the product. Exchange Value: A product is seemed to posses exchange value if the same can be exchanged for another product or money.
  6. 6. Value anaylysis • Value Analysis is organized procedure for efficient identification of unnecessary cost associated with material, part, component, system, or senice by analysis of function and efficiently eliminating them(i.e. unnecessary cost) without impairing the quality, functional capacity or its reliability Value Analysis contributes to improve profitability; hence it can be applied at any time in the stage of product life cycle.
  7. 7. Value Engineering • Value Engineering is a systematic effort to improve the valueof a product,project or system and optimize the life cycle cost. • It is a process that identifies opportunities to remove unnecessary cost while assuring that quality ,performance, and other critical factors meet the customer expectations.
  8. 8. Importance of value engineering and value analysis • Value engineering • Value Engineering (VE) is concerned with new products. It is applied during product development. The focus is on reducing costs, improving function or both, by way of teamwork-based product evaluation and analysis. This takes place before any capital is invested in tooling, plant or equipment.
  9. 9. • This is very significant, because according to many reports, up to 80% of a product’s costs (throughout the rest of its life-cycle), are locked in at the design development stage. This is understandable when you consider the design of any product determines many factors, such as tooling, plant and equipment, labour and skills, training costs, materials, shipping, installation, maintenance, as well as decommissioning and recycle costs. • Therefore value engineering should be considered a crucial activity late on in the product development process and is certainly a wise commercial investment, with regard to the time it takes. It is strongly recommended you build value engineering into your new product development process, to make it more robust and for sound commercial reasons.
  10. 10. Value analysis • Value Analysis (VA) is concerned with existing products. It involves a current product being analysed and evaluated by a team, to reduce costs, improve product function or both. Value Analysis exercises use a plan which step-by-step, methodically evaluates the product in a range of areas. These include costs, function, alternative components and design aspects such as ease of manufacture and assembly. • A significant part of VA is a technique called Functional Analysis, where the product is broken down and reviewed as a number of assemblies. Here, the function is identified and defined for each product assembly. Costs are also assigned to each one. This is assisted by designing and viewing products as assemblies (or modules). As with VE, VA is a group activity that involves brainstorming improvements and alternatives to improve the value of the product, particular to the customer.
  11. 11. Difference between value analysis ane Value engineering Value Analysis Value Engineering Value analysis is the application of set of techniques to an existing product with a view to improve its value. Value Engineering is the application of same set of techniques to a new product at the design stage- project concept or preliminary design when no hardware exists. Value Analysis is thus a remedial process Value Engineering is thus a preventive process Value Analysis is done after the birth of the product Value Engineering is an early stage process Value Analysis is done to have better optimized commercial output. Value Engineering provides better engineering results.
  12. 12. Steps for value analysis • 1: orientation/preparation • Identify what is to be analysed. This will typically be one of: • A manufactured item. This can be anything from a screw to an engine, although a more complex item is likely to result in a more complex and time-consuming analysis. • A process or service. Again, all levels can be analysed, from a hand assembly process to a complete customer service organisation. • 2: information • Identify and prioritise the customers of the item from step 1. This may include external customers, such as 'auto suppliers' and internal customers, such as 'finance manager'. • Note that external customers are usually more important than internal customers, and that seniority does not necessarily equate with priority. A customer's preference for a product feature should be more important than the opinion of a senior designer.
  13. 13. • 3: analysis • In this phase the functions of the product are analysed by Functional Analysis, which is aimed at identifying functions given by a product or part of it. Functions have an importance (weight) and a cost. These costs are quantified and this leads to a list of functions ordered by their importance and value. This means that there is an analysis of how each function satisfies customer needs, and then, an analysis of what the cost of those functions is. • This phase of Value Analysis may be considered as the key one of the whole methodology as it represents the translation of needs to functions (see the specific technique). • 4: innovation/creativity • For this phase it is necessary to use creative techniques that generate alternatives. Starting from the analysis of functions and costs, there is a search for means that allow elimination, change or improvement of components and functions. • It is important to look for different ways of satisfying the basic functions, even if it means rejecting the current approach and starting again with a clean drawing board. This requires the product or process to be 'mentally destroyed' and then rebuild a new one.
  14. 14. • It represents a confrontation of ideas, a collection of information about the feasibility and cost of those ideas, and measures the value of the best alternatives. • This analysis or evaluation uses the same techniques of value measurement that have been used in previous steps. At this point an examination is done about the grade of functional accomplishment and the economical analysis of those alternatives that offer the higher value. Some of the techniques are well-known such as Cash-flow analysis and break-even point. • The team involved in Value Analysis needs an objective analysis of the ideas generated through the innovation phase. The evaluation phase is carried out in two main steps: • A qualitative analysis of value regarding objectives in design, cost, implementation facilities, etc. • A quantitative analysis using numerical techniques of value measurement that leads to a few alternatives of high value that will be analysed in depth. • This process usually involves determining the cost and select those ideas that can be practically implemented. This may include work to develop and refine promising ideas into practical and optimum solutions. • 6: implementation and monitoring • In this phase it is necessary to prepare a report that summarizes the work that has been done, including conclusions and specific proposals. It will be also necessary to describe actions plans for implementation, in which project management techniques would be useful. • Finally a plan should be included for monitoring of the actions. This should be based in the accomplishment of objectives. • The application of Value Analysis only needs to make use of Basic Techniques such as matrixes, pareto chart, pert and gantt diagrams, etc., in most of the Value Analysis steps.
  15. 15. Steps for value engineering • Information gathering - This asks what the requirements are for the object. Function analysis, an important technique in value engineering, is usually done in this initial stage. It tries to determine what functions or performance characteristics are important. It asks questions like; What does the object do? What must it do? What should it do? What could it do? What must it not do? • Alternative generation (creation) - In this stage value engineers ask; What are the various alternative ways of meeting requirements? What else will perform the desired function? • Evaluation - In this stage all the alternatives are assessed by evaluating how well they meet the required functions and how great the cost savings will be. • Presentation - In the final stage, the best alternative will be chosen and presented to the client for final decision.
  16. 16. Techniques of value engineering and value analysis • Obtain all available cost • Evaluate function by comparision • Seek information from the best or the most authentic source • Avoid generalities/work in specifies • Get all the facts • Discuss with specialist and utilize their ideas • Use standard part wherever possible. • Consult you supplier for new ideas • Think creatively
  17. 17. Check list • A checklist is a type of informational job aid used to reduce failure by compensating for potential limits of human memory and attention. It helps to ensure consistency and completeness in carrying out a task. A basic example is the "to do list." A more advanced checklist would be a schedule, which lays out tasks to be done according to time of day or other factors. A primary task in checklist is documentation of the task and auditing against the documentation.
  18. 18. • The following list of issues should be considered during this stage: • A. Material Specification and Content • 1. What material is used • 2. Why is this material used • 3. Can the materials be substituted with another, material • 4. Can the dimensions be reduced • 5. Oversize by calculation • B. Material & Manufacturing • 1. How much of the basic material is wasted in conversion • 2. What are the causes of the waste • 3. Can the waste be reduced • 4. Can alternative methods • 5. Can the materials be provided in a different format • 6. Can parts be made for many products
  19. 19. • C. Standardization • 1. Is the component made from the standard raw material • 2. Is the component standard • 3. Can the special parts be replaced with standard parts • D. Direct Labour Costs • 1. What are the labour operations involved • 2. What are the direct labour costs • E. Tolerances & Finishes • 1. What tolerances have been specified and why were they specified as control items • 2. What are the critical limits • 3. Are all specified tolerances relaxed to ease manufacture, to allow an alternative method of manufacture or • permit a lower purchase costs • F. Costs of material • 1. What parts are bought-out?
  20. 20. Advantage • Reduce cost of product • Most suitable products are manufactured • It helps emplooyess in better understanding of their jobs. • The constant search for improvement leads to greater all round efficiency • It helps to generate new concepts and ideas for the R&d work • It also creates cost and consciousness among the employees.

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