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Prepared By
A.Prasad roshan
prasadroshan1982@gmail.com
Prepared By
A.Prasad roshan
prasadroshan1982@gmail.com
What is safety ?
Protecting your self and
others
Safety is the absence of
injury,
Procedures intended to prevent
injury...
 Clean work area
 Tools would be clean
 Proper tools for opening /closing
 All equipment safety guards installed
 Equ...
Safety awareness is important on the job
to stay away you from hurting or
killing someone else
Safety awareness
Safety awa...
0
LOSS
FAILURE
DEFECT
DOUBT
ACCIDENT
BREAKDOWN
Safety is no accident
What is an accident in industrial
establishment ?
The FACTORIES ACT,1948, defines
accident as, "an occurrence (act of some...
 Falling
 Inhaling
 Electrical Contact
 Exposure to Heat or Cold
 Striking Against
 Getting Hit
 Getting Caught in
...
 OPERATING WITHOUT AUTHORITY
 FAILURE TO SECURE OR STORE MATERIALS PROPERLY
 FAILURE TO SIGNAL OR ADVISE
 OPERATING AT...
9
 Lack of training for personnel
 Hazardous arrangement of tools,
machines, equipment, supplies, etc.
 Improper illumi...
10
 sources of MOTION
 sources of EXTREME temperatures
 types of chemical exposures
 sources of harmful dust
 sources...
11
Equipment worn by an
employee that is designed to
prevent injury or illness from
a specific hazard.
It's better to correct an unsafe friend than to bury one
 Eye protection comes in many forms, such as safety glasses,
goggles, face shields, and welding protection.
 Your superv...
Neoprene
Polyvinyl
Alcohol
(PVC)
Wire mesh
Polyvinyl
Chloride (PVC)
Nitrile
Natural
Rubber
Leather
Kevlar WeldingCotton
An...
Glove Uses
Cotton Light duty material handling and cleanup work
Leather Equipment handling, general construction, heavy cl...
 Do not use a power tool until you
understand it thoroughly and it has been
demonstrated by the instructor.
 Use guards ...
HAND OPERATED TOOLS
Tools must be
guarded
When you gamble with safety you bet your life
 When using screwdrivers, place the object on a
flat surface or in a Don’t hold it in your
hand!
 Don’t use screwdrivers...
 Use safety knives whenever
possible
 Keep knife blades sharp
 Cut away from your body
 Do not use knife blades as
scr...
 Never use a hammer with a broken, cracked, or
loose handle
 Use the correct hammer for the job
 Don’t strike a hammer ...
 Use moderate pressure on hack saws to prevent
blade failure
 Spray saw blades lightly with lubricant prior to use
 Kee...
 When possible use a safety chisel
 Don’t use chisels with mushroomed heads
 Use the correct chisel for the job
 Don’t...
 Use the correct sized wrench for the job
 Don’t use pliers with worn grooves
 Don’t use pliers over-tight bolts and nu...
 Use high-temperature
gloves to handle hot or
cold parts and
equipment
Never dispose of used razor blades, broken glass, or other
sharp objects in regular trash cans! Keep a metal can
specifica...
26
Portable Tools
 Disconnect power tools when not in use and before
changing bits, blades, and other accessories
 Wear anti-vibration glo...
28
The spindle speed of the machine shall be checked before
mounting of the wheel to be certain that it does not exceed th...
 Unplug or Lockout tools before changing blades
 Keep tools sharp
 Never remove guards
 Use a drill press vise when dr...
30
Abrasive wheels shall be
used only on machine
provided with safety
guards.
Portable abrasive
wheels
 Don’t wear gloves when operating bench grinders
 Never remove guards!
 Maintain proper clearances on tool rests and to...
Immediately before mounting, all wheels shall be closely
inspected and sounded by the user
Ring test
 Remove jewelry before
using power tools or
working on machines
No pain know safety
34
“FATAL FACT”
Employee killed when struck in head by a nail fired
from a powder actuated tool. Tool operator was
attempt...
35
“FATAL FACT”
Employees performing remodeling operations building a wall.
Operator was attempting to anchor plywood to a...
• Use tag lines
• Wear leather gloves
• Never place your hand on top of the load or between the
load and a fixed object
• ...
 Don’t operate a machine until:
 Receiving proper instruction
 You fully understand how to use it
 You have permission...
The best way to prevent back injuries is to develop
habits that reduce the strain placed on the back. There
are some basic...
 Take a balanced stance with your feet
about a shoulder-width apart. one foot can
be behind the object and the other next...
 Lift gradually (without jerking) using your leg, abdominal and buttock
muscles and keeping the load as close to you as p...
Don’t forget the most common
causes of back injury
 Bending
 Twisting
 Heavy Lifting
Stay safe, someone at home is wait...
SEMINAR
Confined Space EntryConfined Space Entry
Definitions:
The entrant is the person who enters a confined space.
The attendant...
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY -CONFINED SPACE ENTRY -
HAZARDSHAZARDS
Both animal and plant life
require oxygen to live. One of the
...
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDSCONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDS
Oxygen in concentrations
greater than 23% is too
oxygen rich ...
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDSCONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDS
Oxygen deficiency can be caused by several
processes:
Consump...
CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY
The entry of a confined space begins with a
Confined Space Entry Permit.
Confined...
CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY
Each process hazard to which
the entrant may be exposed,
adjacent operations or p...
CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY
The safety representative
tests the space for
hazardous concentrations
of known h...
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDSCONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDS
If concentrations of
materials are found to
be at harmful lev...
CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY
Means of emergency rescue
must be readily available
to the confined space
entry a...
CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY
A means must be provided
for both safe normal entry
or exit , and emergency
disco...
o
Danger
Do not use!
o
Danger
Do not use!
CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY
Confined Space Entry Permit
Requirement...
CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY
Entrants must leave the
confined space when the
monitor alarm is activated.
It is...
CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY
The attendant should
attempt to remove the
entrant from the confined
space using ...
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY - SUMMARYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY - SUMMARY
Confined space entry hazards can include:
- the presence of t...
Safety in welding
11 - 59
 Should be worn
 Also behind hood to prevent severe arc
flash reaching eyes
 Can Absorb more than 99.9%
harmful...
11 - 60
 Gloves to protect hands
 Made of leather or some other type of fire-resistant material
 Leather capes, sleeves...
 100% cotton or wool
 Thick enough to prevent
injurious ultraviolet rays
from penetrating to skin
 Long sleeves
 Shirt...
11 - 62
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
With out safety shoes , doing plasma
cutting
Safety check list for welding
1) Check that the power source functions correctly,
2) you are familiar with its operation.
...
65
 Inspection
 Frequent
 Daily, monthly
 Hooks, rope, crane operation
 Periodic
 At least annually
 Complete inspe...
66
 Contact with energized power lines
(45% of accidents)
 De-energize overhead lines
 Maintain minimum distance
 10 f...
67
 Proper outrigger use
 Level
 Fully extended
 Stable base
 Use cribbing to
distribute the load
68
Floor-mounted
jib crane
Floor-mounted
jib crane
Wall-mounted jib crane
 The crane is the most
common type of equipment
which most often contacts
overhead power lines.
 When contact happens, t...
EFCOG Electrical Improvement Project
 Power hoist
 Usually electric
operated
 Tower cranes
Practical Exercise
1. Tuck your thumbs into the palms of your
hands
2. Now tie your shoes
It’s not so easy is it?
 Hand injuries can be associated with working
with machinery or equipment
 The materials being used or the job process
m...
The most common causes of hand injuries are:
 Carelessness
 Lack of awareness
 dullness
 pay no attention for safety p...
To avoid hand injuries:
 Know the hazards and dangers in the job to be done
 Be aware of pinch points
 Be aware of hot ...
77
 Rigging: The hardware
and equipment used to
safely attach a load to a
lifting device
Wire rope
78
 Always use rigging to connect the load to the
hook
 Materials
 Wire rope
 Fabric
 Chain
 Slings
 Straight (regu...
 Know the weight of the load
 Know the center of gravity of the load.
 Make load attachment above the center of gravity...
Sl no DIAMETER OF
SLIG in inch
SWL
1 ¼ 300kg
2 3/8 800kg
3 1/2 1.0ton
4 5/8 2.0ton
5 3/4 3.0ton
6 1 5.0ton
7 1 1/4 8.0ton
...
LOAD
L
H
Load ÷ Number of legs) X (L ÷ H) = Load each sling leg
Load each sling leg
ExampleExample
Load = 120,000 poundsLoad = 120,000 pounds
4 load legs ÷ 120,000 equals4 load legs ÷ 120,000 equals
30,000 ...
Center of GravityCenter of Gravity
A load is stable when:A load is stable when:
– The hook is directly above the center of...
Hooks are designed to apply
the load at the bottom of the
saddle.
LOAD
Shackles and hooks
Manufacturers’ identification
Never weld on hooks or shackles
Working safety latch on hooks
Recommended...
Never replace a shackle
pin with a bolt.
The load will bend the
bolt.
Bad Good
Avoid eccentric
loads.
GoodBad
Proper chocking of
shackles.
Check wear
Check cracks,
bending and
twisting
Check wear and
straightness
Pin always seated
Check opening
width
 Slips and falls injure more people than any
other type of accident.
 Pay attention to hazards such as wet or slippery
f...
 Don’t take chances. If you can’t extinguish the fire
safely, leave the fire fighting to the professionals.
 Learn where...
 Never use electrical tools near water.
 Use Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI)
around water source.
 Report dama...
05/21/99 7
Eliminate confusion
Know proper work practices for chemical
materials you use
Use unbreakable secondary contain...
 Some can be seen
 Some can be smelled
 Some can be tasted
 Most can be felt (e.g. burning
sensation, choking)
 All c...
Can not be seen
Can not be smelled
Can not be tasted
Can not be felt
Can be rapidly detected by
instruments!
05/21/99 28
Know the properties of all the hazardous materials you
handle
Prevent spills
If a potentially hazardous spill ...
Scrap lumber, waste material, and rubbish
Removed from the immediate work area as the work
progresses.
Disposal of waste m...
 If you are injured on the job, you
must report the injury to your
supervisor immediately.
 Even if you don’t need medic...
 Keep your work
area clean & clear
 Notify your inst. if
anything breaks
or malfunctions
 Get first aid
treatment for
e...
Be AboutBe About
job Safetyjob Safety
Smart
Thank
you
Safety in mechanical  maintenance
Safety in mechanical  maintenance
Safety in mechanical  maintenance
Safety in mechanical  maintenance
Safety in mechanical  maintenance
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Safety in mechanical maintenance

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Safety in mechanical maintenance

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Safety in mechanical maintenance

  1. 1. Prepared By A.Prasad roshan prasadroshan1982@gmail.com Prepared By A.Prasad roshan prasadroshan1982@gmail.com
  2. 2. What is safety ? Protecting your self and others Safety is the absence of injury, Procedures intended to prevent injury Freedom from danger, risk, or injury Safety First, Last and Always
  3. 3.  Clean work area  Tools would be clean  Proper tools for opening /closing  All equipment safety guards installed  Equipment and power tools properly grounded For All Job ,Safety First!
  4. 4. Safety awareness is important on the job to stay away you from hurting or killing someone else Safety awareness Safety awareness saves lives
  5. 5. 0 LOSS FAILURE DEFECT DOUBT ACCIDENT BREAKDOWN Safety is no accident
  6. 6. What is an accident in industrial establishment ? The FACTORIES ACT,1948, defines accident as, "an occurrence (act of something happening) in an industrial establishment causing bodily injury to a person which makes him unfit to resume his duties in the next 48 hours”
  7. 7.  Falling  Inhaling  Electrical Contact  Exposure to Heat or Cold  Striking Against  Getting Hit  Getting Caught in  Exposure to Fire Think Safety
  8. 8.  OPERATING WITHOUT AUTHORITY  FAILURE TO SECURE OR STORE MATERIALS PROPERLY  FAILURE TO SIGNAL OR ADVISE  OPERATING AT UNSAFE SPEEDS  CAUGHT IN OR BETWEEN  CONTACT WITH  STRUCK BY  FALL FROM OR ONTO  SLIP OR TRIP  WHAT IF?
  9. 9. 9  Lack of training for personnel  Hazardous arrangement of tools, machines, equipment, supplies, etc.  Improper illumination  Unsafe ventilation
  10. 10. 10  sources of MOTION  sources of EXTREME temperatures  types of chemical exposures  sources of harmful dust  sources of light radiation  sources of falling objects  sources of sharp objects  sources or rolling or pinching objects  layout of workplace and location of co workers  any electrical hazards
  11. 11. 11 Equipment worn by an employee that is designed to prevent injury or illness from a specific hazard.
  12. 12. It's better to correct an unsafe friend than to bury one
  13. 13.  Eye protection comes in many forms, such as safety glasses, goggles, face shields, and welding protection.  Your supervisor will select the proper eye protection for the hazard, but the most important thing is for you to wear it when provided.  Don’t wear old or loose-fitting clothing that can get caught in moving machinery.  Wear serviceable leather top shoes. Athletic shoes don’t offer foot protection  Be aware that long hair and jewelry can get caught in moving machinery.  When handling rough or sharp parts, wear the proper gloves for your hands.
  14. 14. Neoprene Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVC) Wire mesh Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) Nitrile Natural Rubber Leather Kevlar WeldingCotton Anti-vibration
  15. 15. Glove Uses Cotton Light duty material handling and cleanup work Leather Equipment handling, general construction, heavy cleanup, welding, moderately hot or cold material handling Shock absorbing Operating rotary hammers and other vibrating equipment Kevlar or Wire mesh Work with sheet metal, glass, or heavy cutting These gloves Do Not provide puncture protection Rubber, nitrile, neoprene, PVC, PVA and other synthetics Chemical gloves must be chosen for the specific chemical being used Insulated Extreme high and low temperatures Which Glove is Best?
  16. 16.  Do not use a power tool until you understand it thoroughly and it has been demonstrated by the instructor.  Use guards on power tools  Always keep fingers away from the moving cutting edges  Keep the floor around the work area clean
  17. 17. HAND OPERATED TOOLS Tools must be guarded When you gamble with safety you bet your life
  18. 18.  When using screwdrivers, place the object on a flat surface or in a Don’t hold it in your hand!  Don’t use screwdrivers as chisels or pry bars  Use the correct size driver for the screw  Don’t use screwdrivers with chipped tips
  19. 19.  Use safety knives whenever possible  Keep knife blades sharp  Cut away from your body  Do not use knife blades as screwdrivers  Avoid working on the same object when a co-worker is using a knife Safety Knives
  20. 20.  Never use a hammer with a broken, cracked, or loose handle  Use the correct hammer for the job  Don’t strike a hammer face with another hammer
  21. 21.  Use moderate pressure on hack saws to prevent blade failure  Spray saw blades lightly with lubricant prior to use  Keep blades sharp
  22. 22.  When possible use a safety chisel  Don’t use chisels with mushroomed heads  Use the correct chisel for the job  Don’t use chisels as lever open bars Safety chisel
  23. 23.  Use the correct sized wrench for the job  Don’t use pliers with worn grooves  Don’t use pliers over-tight bolts and nuts
  24. 24.  Use high-temperature gloves to handle hot or cold parts and equipment
  25. 25. Never dispose of used razor blades, broken glass, or other sharp objects in regular trash cans! Keep a metal can specifically for disposal of sharp objects.
  26. 26. 26 Portable Tools
  27. 27.  Disconnect power tools when not in use and before changing bits, blades, and other accessories  Wear anti-vibration gloves when using power tools that vibrate excessively  Never remove guards!  Ground power tools unless double insulated  Don’t wear gloves if they can get caught on  rotating parts  Secure work in a or on a bench - Don’t hold it in your hand!
  28. 28. 28 The spindle speed of the machine shall be checked before mounting of the wheel to be certain that it does not exceed the maximum operating speed marked on the wheel. Max RPM
  29. 29.  Unplug or Lockout tools before changing blades  Keep tools sharp  Never remove guards  Use a drill press vise when drilling – Don’t hold parts with your hands! Drill press vise
  30. 30. 30 Abrasive wheels shall be used only on machine provided with safety guards. Portable abrasive wheels
  31. 31.  Don’t wear gloves when operating bench grinders  Never remove guards!  Maintain proper clearances on tool rests and tongue guards  Use vice grips when grinding small parts Maintain tool rest within 1/8” of the wheel Maintain tongue guard within ¼” of the wheel Don’t use grinders on aluminum unless the wheel is specifically intended for use with aluminum! Bench Grinders
  32. 32. Immediately before mounting, all wheels shall be closely inspected and sounded by the user Ring test
  33. 33.  Remove jewelry before using power tools or working on machines No pain know safety
  34. 34. 34 “FATAL FACT” Employee killed when struck in head by a nail fired from a powder actuated tool. Tool operator was attempting to anchor a plywood.
  35. 35. 35 “FATAL FACT” Employees performing remodeling operations building a wall. Operator was attempting to anchor plywood to a 2”x 4” stud. The nail penetrated the stud and struck the victim. One worker killed when struck by a nail from a powder-actuated tool.
  36. 36. • Use tag lines • Wear leather gloves • Never place your hand on top of the load or between the load and a fixed object • Inspect hooks and chain slings before use
  37. 37.  Don’t operate a machine until:  Receiving proper instruction  You fully understand how to use it  You have permission  Always wear eye protection  Know and understand all the manufacturers’ safety rules
  38. 38. The best way to prevent back injuries is to develop habits that reduce the strain placed on the back. There are some basic things you can do to help. Avoid Lifting and Bending Whenever You Can! Place objects up off the floor. If you can set Something down on a table or other elevated surface instead of on the floor, do it so you won't have to reach down to pick it up again. Raise / lower shelves. The best zone for lifting is between your shoulders and your waist. Put heavier objects on shelves at waist level, lighter objects on lower or higher shelves.
  39. 39.  Take a balanced stance with your feet about a shoulder-width apart. one foot can be behind the object and the other next to it.  Squat down to lift the object, but keep your heels off the floor. Get as close to the object as you can. Keep your back straight.  Use your palms (not just your fingers) to get a secure grip on the load. Make sure you'll be able to maintain a hold on the object without switching your grip later.
  40. 40.  Lift gradually (without jerking) using your leg, abdominal and buttock muscles and keeping the load as close to you as possible. Keep your chin tucked in so as to keep a relatively straight back and neck line.  Once you're standing, change directions by pointing your feet in the direction you want to go and turning your whole body. Avoid twisting at your waist while carrying a load.  By following these lifting guidelines and by practicing good body/back management, you can prevent back injuries on the job and at home.
  41. 41. Don’t forget the most common causes of back injury  Bending  Twisting  Heavy Lifting Stay safe, someone at home is waiting for you
  42. 42. SEMINAR
  43. 43. Confined Space EntryConfined Space Entry Definitions: The entrant is the person who enters a confined space. The attendant is the person who stays with the entrant outside the confined space, and is responsible for assisting the entrant in exiting the confined space, and calling for emergency assistance when required. The safety representative is the qualified person who evaluates the hazards, prescribes required equipment and precautions and issues the Confined Space Entry Permit.
  44. 44. CONFINED SPACE ENTRY -CONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDSHAZARDS Both animal and plant life require oxygen to live. One of the primary hazards of entering confined spaces is oxygen deficiency. When oxygen is present in concentrations less than 19.5% the atmosphere is said to be oxygen deficient. O2 O2
  45. 45. CONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDSCONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDS Oxygen in concentrations greater than 23% is too oxygen rich and can cause combustible materials to ignite very quickly.
  46. 46. CONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDSCONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDS Oxygen deficiency can be caused by several processes: Consumption: oxygen is used up by the person who is in the confined space and turned into carbon dioxide. Displacement: denser materials push the oxygen out of the occupied space. Reaction: oxygen is reacted with other materials to make other compounds.
  47. 47. CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY The entry of a confined space begins with a Confined Space Entry Permit. Confined Space Entry Permit Location and Description of Confined Space: Reason for Entry: Permit Issued to (Name of Company/Organization): Confined Space Entry Permit Location and Description of Confined Space: Reason for Entry: Permit Issued to (Name of Company/Organization): The permit system requires that a qualified safety representative visit the work location and evaluate the conditions under which entry will be made.
  48. 48. CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY Each process hazard to which the entrant may be exposed, adjacent operations or processes, and scheduled activity are reviewed. For each hazard identified, countermeasures are detailed on the Confined Space Entry Permit.
  49. 49. CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY The safety representative tests the space for hazardous concentrations of known harmful substances, such as hydrogen sulfide, carbon monoxide, and flammable liquid or gas. The concentration of oxygen is measured at the same time.
  50. 50. CONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDSCONFINED SPACE ENTRY - HAZARDS If concentrations of materials are found to be at harmful levels, the confined space must be ventilated to remove them before entry. ?? ?? ?? Fresh Air Fresh outside air is blown into the space to dilute and remove contaminants, and supply oxygen. Fresh outside air is blown into the space to dilute and remove contaminants, and supply oxygen. O2 O2 O2 O2
  51. 51. CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY Means of emergency rescue must be readily available to the confined space entry attendant for emergency extrication of entrants.
  52. 52. CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY A means must be provided for both safe normal entry or exit , and emergency disconnection. Tripods with hoist, lifeline, and full body harness are often used for emergency extrication. Ladders may be used for ordinary entry and exit.
  53. 53. o Danger Do not use! o Danger Do not use! CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY Confined Space Entry Permit Requirements Ground Fault Interruption yes no Lockout of Hazardous Energy Sources yes no Confined Space Entry Permit Requirements Ground Fault Interruption yes no Lockout of Hazardous Energy Sources yes no Required countermeasures also include prevention of electrical shock hazards due to loss of earth ground for portable tools. GFCI’s are required for portable electric tooling. There may also be a need to lockout and tag equipment both in the confined space and on adjacent equipment and processes.
  54. 54. CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY Entrants must leave the confined space when the monitor alarm is activated. It is the attendant’s responsibility to see that the entrant leaves the space during an alarm. Entrants must leave the confined space when the monitor alarm is activated. It is the attendant’s responsibility to see that the entrant leaves the space during an alarm. CO CO2 O2 Entrants must constantly monitor the confined space for toxic gases, oxygen, and combustible gases. Entrants will be issued a personal monitor to wear for this purpose.
  55. 55. CONFINED SPACE ENTRYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY The attendant should attempt to remove the entrant from the confined space using tripods, hoist, and lifelines. Attendants are NOT TO ENTER CONFINED SPACES. Only properly equipped and trained emergency rescue personnel may enter confined spaces to make rescues. The attendant should attempt to remove the entrant from the confined space using tripods, hoist, and lifelines. Attendants are NOT TO ENTER CONFINED SPACES. Only properly equipped and trained emergency rescue personnel may enter confined spaces to make rescues.
  56. 56. CONFINED SPACE ENTRY - SUMMARYCONFINED SPACE ENTRY - SUMMARY Confined space entry hazards can include: - the presence of toxic substances - insufficient oxygen, or too much oxygen - presence of combustible gases and liquids - process or equipment related hazards. - conditions changing from nonhazardous to hazardous.
  57. 57. Safety in welding
  58. 58. 11 - 59  Should be worn  Also behind hood to prevent severe arc flash reaching eyes  Can Absorb more than 99.9% harmful ultraviolet rays  Worn by others who work with welders  Light in weight, well ventilated, and comfortable  Lenses have light tint (Not dark!) and tented side shields Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. © RobCrandall/The Image Works
  59. 59. 11 - 60  Gloves to protect hands  Made of leather or some other type of fire-resistant material  Leather capes, sleeves, shoulder garments with removable aprons  Split-type apron if sitting down  No place to collect hot particles  High-top shoes  Leggings and spats Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Department of Labor
  60. 60.  100% cotton or wool  Thick enough to prevent injurious ultraviolet rays from penetrating to skin  Long sleeves  Shirts buttoned to neck  Shirttails tucked  pants long enough to cover top of leather boots Miller Electric Mfg. Co. Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
  61. 61. 11 - 62 Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
  62. 62. With out safety shoes , doing plasma cutting
  63. 63. Safety check list for welding 1) Check that the power source functions correctly, 2) you are familiar with its operation. 3) Ensure that gas cylinders are properly secured, 4). Acetylene and oxygen regulators shall be fitted with flashback arrestors. 5) Protect cylinders against heat and mechanical damage. 6)The valve opening of the acetylene cylinder shall point away from other compressed gas cylinders, 7) Hoses shall be in good condition, without leaks or damage, and with correct color coding for the gas. 8) Use correct hose connectors and hose clamps. 9) Pieces of pipe and twisted wire must never be used 10) Keep your welding equipment well maintained. Never use defective welding cables.
  64. 64. 65  Inspection  Frequent  Daily, monthly  Hooks, rope, crane operation  Periodic  At least annually  Complete inspection - wear, damage, deterioration, operation  slings  Testing  Records
  65. 65. 66  Contact with energized power lines (45% of accidents)  De-energize overhead lines  Maintain minimum distance  10 feet distance for 50 kv  Over 50 kv, add 4 inches per 10 kv  Use proximity alarms  Warn when energized line is near  “No fatalities” in 25 years, according to mfg.  Warning signs  I-15 construction was a good example Sigalarm®
  66. 66. 67  Proper outrigger use  Level  Fully extended  Stable base  Use cribbing to distribute the load
  67. 67. 68 Floor-mounted jib crane Floor-mounted jib crane Wall-mounted jib crane
  68. 68.  The crane is the most common type of equipment which most often contacts overhead power lines.  When contact happens, the rigger or ground worker is most often electrocuted (90% of time)
  69. 69. EFCOG Electrical Improvement Project
  70. 70.  Power hoist  Usually electric operated  Tower cranes
  71. 71. Practical Exercise 1. Tuck your thumbs into the palms of your hands 2. Now tie your shoes It’s not so easy is it?
  72. 72.  Hand injuries can be associated with working with machinery or equipment  The materials being used or the job process might be hazardous  Hand tools or powered hand tools may be faulty or improperly used Stay safe, someone at home is waiting for you
  73. 73. The most common causes of hand injuries are:  Carelessness  Lack of awareness  dullness  pay no attention for safety procedures  interruption
  74. 74. To avoid hand injuries:  Know the hazards and dangers in the job to be done  Be aware of pinch points  Be aware of hot areas  Be aware of rotating or moving surfaces  Automated machinery may be controlled by remote control, or delayed timing devices that cause the machine to start automatically  Loose clothing and jewelry may be caught up in moving machinery  Never remove machine safeguards or operate machinery with safeguards removed
  75. 75. 77  Rigging: The hardware and equipment used to safely attach a load to a lifting device Wire rope
  76. 76. 78  Always use rigging to connect the load to the hook  Materials  Wire rope  Fabric  Chain  Slings  Straight (regular)  Choker  Basket  Double, triple, etc.
  77. 77.  Know the weight of the load  Know the center of gravity of the load.  Make load attachment above the center of gravity of the load.  Know the rated capacity of slings and hardware. Rules for Rigging Safety
  78. 78. Sl no DIAMETER OF SLIG in inch SWL 1 ¼ 300kg 2 3/8 800kg 3 1/2 1.0ton 4 5/8 2.0ton 5 3/4 3.0ton 6 1 5.0ton 7 1 1/4 8.0ton SWL of various diameter of slings
  79. 79. LOAD L H Load ÷ Number of legs) X (L ÷ H) = Load each sling leg Load each sling leg
  80. 80. ExampleExample Load = 120,000 poundsLoad = 120,000 pounds 4 load legs ÷ 120,000 equals4 load legs ÷ 120,000 equals 30,000 pounds each leg if30,000 pounds each leg if vertical hitchvertical hitch Sling legs are 20 feetSling legs are 20 feet Height from top of load toHeight from top of load to lifting device is 15 feetlifting device is 15 feet 20 ÷ 15 = 1.3320 ÷ 15 = 1.33 Load on each leg is 1.33 xLoad on each leg is 1.33 x 30,000 = 40,000 pounds30,000 = 40,000 pounds 20' 15' 120,000 lb.
  81. 81. Center of GravityCenter of Gravity A load is stable when:A load is stable when: – The hook is directly above the center of gravity of theThe hook is directly above the center of gravity of the loadload Estimate the center of gravityEstimate the center of gravity Lift the load just enough to clear the groundLift the load just enough to clear the ground If the hook is not over the center of gravity the hookIf the hook is not over the center of gravity the hook will travel to the center of gravitywill travel to the center of gravity CG?
  82. 82. Hooks are designed to apply the load at the bottom of the saddle. LOAD
  83. 83. Shackles and hooks Manufacturers’ identification Never weld on hooks or shackles Working safety latch on hooks Recommended Not Recommended Recommended Screw Pin Anchor Shackle Round Pin Anchor Shackle Bolt Type Anchor Shackle
  84. 84. Never replace a shackle pin with a bolt. The load will bend the bolt.
  85. 85. Bad Good Avoid eccentric loads. GoodBad Proper chocking of shackles.
  86. 86. Check wear Check cracks, bending and twisting Check wear and straightness Pin always seated Check opening width
  87. 87.  Slips and falls injure more people than any other type of accident.  Pay attention to hazards such as wet or slippery floors and old carpet or tile.  Eliminate hazards when detected.  Never run at work.  Use only authorized walkways or passageway, especially in warehouses or around machinery.  Always hold onto the handrail when walking up or down stairs.  Use fall protection when working in an elevated area.
  88. 88.  Don’t take chances. If you can’t extinguish the fire safely, leave the fire fighting to the professionals.  Learn where fire extinguishers at your facility are located and make sure you know how to operate them. If time permits, extinguish the fire safely.  Know where emergency exists are located and make sure that they aren’t blocked.  In the event of a fire, personal safety is the greatest concern. Activate the nearest pull alarm to alert everyone else and notify your supervisor.
  89. 89.  Never use electrical tools near water.  Use Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) around water source.  Report damaged switches, plugs, cords, receptacles, tools and other electrical hazards to your supervisor immediately.
  90. 90. 05/21/99 7 Eliminate confusion Know proper work practices for chemical materials you use Use unbreakable secondary containers Store chemicals properly Dispose of waste and excess chemicals in a timely manner
  91. 91.  Some can be seen  Some can be smelled  Some can be tasted  Most can be felt (e.g. burning sensation, choking)  All can be detected by appropriate instruments DANGER TOXIC CHEMICALS
  92. 92. Can not be seen Can not be smelled Can not be tasted Can not be felt Can be rapidly detected by instruments!
  93. 93. 05/21/99 28 Know the properties of all the hazardous materials you handle Prevent spills If a potentially hazardous spill occurs, protect people first, evacuate & ask for help Call Engineering for EMERGENCY spill/fire assistance Call Safety for information and non-emergency assistance You are responsible for reporting or cleaning up spills of materials you use
  94. 94. Scrap lumber, waste material, and rubbish Removed from the immediate work area as the work progresses. Disposal of waste material or debris by burning All solvent waste, oily rags, and flammable liquids Kept in fire resistant covered containers until removed from worksite Disposal of waste materials
  95. 95.  If you are injured on the job, you must report the injury to your supervisor immediately.  Even if you don’t need medical treatment, report all accidents, near misses and injuries to your supervisor when they occur.
  96. 96.  Keep your work area clean & clear  Notify your inst. if anything breaks or malfunctions  Get first aid treatment for every injury
  97. 97. Be AboutBe About job Safetyjob Safety Smart Thank you

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