BUILDING PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCY FORPOVERTY REDUCTION        An overview of the PRAM Initiative – a professional education...
The developmental contextThe development challenges we face and thecontext of poverty reduction efforts in Laos
Poverty in Laos    27% of population - less     than USD 1 / day    74% of population – less     than USD 2 / day    Ag...
Is the situation getting worse?   Increased vulnerability    because of:     –   Climate change     –   Environmental    ...
Outline of the PRAM curriculumPRAM: Poverty Reduction and AgriculturalManagement – a capacity building program foragricult...
PRAM Goals   To make an immediate    and measurable impact    on poverty in southern    Laos   To build capacity of    l...
Four strategic aims of the Lao Ministry ofAgriculture and Forestry   Achieve food security for    the country   Assist c...
Approaching the challenge   Requires two approaches       Long term - gradual development of        existing systems of ...
The immediate demand   Greater effectiveness of    district level government    officers   3000 in seven southern    pro...
The immediate demand   Students: mid-career district level extension    officers with high school or vocational    qualif...
PRAM Components   A MAF perspective    Theory               Skill building      Community     assignments
The developing focus of capacity building for poverty alleviation                       What do DistrictsHRD emphasis     ...
What do District officer need?                                  PRAM    Good skills          +                   Building ...
Key attributes   Reaching out to professionals – a degree    program that targets District agricultural    government ext...
Key attributes    Students can study courses at     any educational institutions     which is a member of the     PRAM Co...
Curriculum structure    PRAM curriculum still being developed.    Alliance of educational institutions and     developme...
PRAM curriculum structure outline                        Composed of two Parts:                              All students...
Orientation course   Part 1 (9 credits)       Introduction to Agriculture       English language       Thai language  ...
Core courses   Agricultural Communication       How to work with communities       Human relationships       Mediation...
Core courses   Agricultural Management       Admin-management skills       Policy and planning       Planning methods ...
Core courses   Field Research Methods       Field research design       Statistics       Research with communities and...
Elective courses   Series of graded community    development projects (PbL)   Consortium able to provide a wide    range...
Fitness for purposeDeveloping a fitness for purpose approach toprofessional education for poverty reduction
Measuring impact at the community level   Did this course lead to a    measurable reduction in    poverty?   A “fitness ...
Quality Assurance Board   Comprising 2 – 3    members from all    stakeholders   Each PRAM course    delivery institutio...
PRAM poverty reduction framework                   Lao National Poverty Eradication Strategy                              ...
The 6 Basic Needs   Food security       Enough food for basic requirements        (2100KCal/person/day, importance of fa...
The 6 Basic Needs   Health and sanitation       Access to clean and safe        water       Access to health care      ...
The 6 Basic Needs   Schools and education       Basic access to primary education       Includes ensuring effectiveness...
The 6 Basic Needs   Housing and clothing       Ensuring families have basic        shelter and sufficient clothing all  ...
The 6 Basic Needs   Roads, access and    communication       The importance of developing        reliable contact with t...
The 6 Basic Needs   Community participation and action       Ensuring ability to effectively        participate in devel...
Some lessons learnedAn overview of the lessons learned by the PRAMstakeholders over the last three years
The need for a local-level focus    Savannakhet University        DLF/MAF lead process, but         difficult to coordin...
International partnerships   The Wetlands Alliance       AIT, CORIN-ASIA, WWF, World Fish       Role changed, need to a...
Facilitating partnerships   Important attributes       Ability to identify new opportunities       Neutrality, respecte...
DLF perspective of PRAM institutional partnerships                         National University of    Champasak            ...
Supporting teaching development   Opportunities       to test and develop new approaches       re-evaluate learner need...
Supporting QA development   The need for regional/international    certification/quality assurance   Jointly developing ...
Future directions and challengesSome ideas for developing the PRAM initiativeand issues that need to be addressed forscali...
Regional expansion   On-going dialogue to establish PRAM-    like programs in Philippines, East Timor,    Thailand, Burma...
The challenge of learning from the past and eachother    How can students learn from past     students?    How can teach...
The challenge of information and recordsmanagement    What is the best way to collect and manage the     assessment infor...
The challenge of communication   Teachers wish they had easier way to    contact students   How can communication be imp...
Thank younickudon@gmail.com
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Building professional competency for poverty reduction

407 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
407
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
54
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Building professional competency for poverty reduction

  1. 1. BUILDING PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCY FORPOVERTY REDUCTION An overview of the PRAM Initiative – a professional education program for agricultural development workers in Laos
  2. 2. The developmental contextThe development challenges we face and thecontext of poverty reduction efforts in Laos
  3. 3. Poverty in Laos  27% of population - less than USD 1 / day  74% of population – less than USD 2 / day  Agriculture: 41% of GDP, 80% of employment  National Growth and Poverty Eradication Strategy
  4. 4. Is the situation getting worse? Increased vulnerability because of: – Climate change – Environmental degradation – Reduced food security – Economic crisis, increasing energy costs
  5. 5. Outline of the PRAM curriculumPRAM: Poverty Reduction and AgriculturalManagement – a capacity building program foragricultural extension working in Laos
  6. 6. PRAM Goals To make an immediate and measurable impact on poverty in southern Laos To build capacity of local government workers to reduce poverty
  7. 7. Four strategic aims of the Lao Ministry ofAgriculture and Forestry Achieve food security for the country Assist communities to develop agricultural production for cash Stabilize shifting cultivation to alleviate poverty Sustainably develop forests
  8. 8. Approaching the challenge Requires two approaches  Long term - gradual development of existing systems of professional training and education. Yield results in 10 years+  Short-term – need new model for professional development (capacity building) that will help MAF respond to urgent national problems.
  9. 9. The immediate demand Greater effectiveness of district level government officers 3000 in seven southern provinces alone Urgent need to reduce rapid destruction of natural environment (deforestation, dam construction) Urgent need to mitigate impact of negative environmental changes
  10. 10. The immediate demand Students: mid-career district level extension officers with high school or vocational qualifications linked to official Ministry systems of staff promotion Courses taught near workplace four week blocks, after which students return to their stations Project-based learning, Problem-based leaning key for addressing linkages between environment and poverty reduction “Fitness for Purpose” approach to quality assurance
  11. 11. PRAM Components A MAF perspective Theory Skill building Community assignments
  12. 12. The developing focus of capacity building for poverty alleviation What do DistrictsHRD emphasis officers need toin the past know? Knowledge- based courses What do HRD emphasis District in the future officers need to do? Work-based courses
  13. 13. What do District officer need? PRAM Good skills + Building competence Assessment Good knowledge + Good staff Good attitude for poverty reduction
  14. 14. Key attributes Reaching out to professionals – a degree program that targets District agricultural government extension officers from Southern Laos. Establishing regional standards – developing transboundary collaboration and establishing regional standards for agricultural extension and professional education for poverty reduction Providing a choice - of what, when and where they study. All students study part-time Increasing access to education – developing a harmonized approach to agricultural education, farmer extension and community development. Measuring “fitness for purpose” – students are assessed on the basis of their ability to reduce poverty in poor communities in the Districts they work both during and after their studies
  15. 15. Key attributes  Students can study courses at any educational institutions which is a member of the PRAM Consortium  Consortium members follow agreed norms and standards established for PRAM course delivery and assessment.  Key components of norms and standards:  Problem-Based Learning approach to teaching  Fitness for Purpose approach to assessment
  16. 16. Curriculum structure  PRAM curriculum still being developed.  Alliance of educational institutions and development agencies responsible for developing curriculum agreed to three main types of courses:  Orientation courses  Core courses  Elective courses
  17. 17. PRAM curriculum structure outline Composed of two Parts:  All students need to take these courses before they begin the Core Orientation courses courses (20 credits)  Students mid-career professionals who have wide range of backgrounds and professional experience  Full time study to “immerse” students in a learning environment Compulsory courses for registered students Core courses – Part-time study for students (20 credits) – Practical assignments in workplace and community – Basic competencies (knowledge + skills + attitude) – General courses for poverty reduction and food security Elective courses for registered and non-registered students – Project based learning Elective courses – Workplace teaching (20 credits) – Impact on poverty required for course completion
  18. 18. Orientation course Part 1 (9 credits)  Introduction to Agriculture  English language  Thai language  Computer skills  Introduction to Education Part 2 (9 credits)  Science and Mathematics  Environment and Society  Communication Team Work and Facilitation  Basic Accounting
  19. 19. Core courses Agricultural Communication  How to work with communities  Human relationships  Mediation skills  Negotiation skills  Facilitation skills Health and Sanitation  Food security  International standards quarantine  Public health and sanitation  Notifiable diseases  Animal management for good health  Basic disease understanding and diagnosis Agro-Ecology  Environmental management  Biodiversity  Conservation  Pollution control management  International conventions
  20. 20. Core courses Agricultural Management  Admin-management skills  Policy and planning  Planning methods  Proposal writing  Project management  Donor liaison Natural Food Security  Basic food productivities skills  Food from natural recourses  Food security  Preservation  Post-harvest processing  Indigenous food knowledge Poverty Mitigation  Dimension of poverty  Poverty causes  Poverty management  Inequalities  Poverty reduction policies  Gender
  21. 21. Core courses Field Research Methods  Field research design  Statistics  Research with communities and farmers  Data analysis and presentation  Report writing  Data-Information management processing Agricultural Extension  Extension approaches  Techniques  Rural leadership  Rural finances  Group formation  TOT teaching PRAM Seminar  Students present seminar based on a subject related to their work and poverty reduction.
  22. 22. Elective courses Series of graded community development projects (PbL) Consortium able to provide a wide range of courses – students select according to job requirements. Also available to district officers without registering for the full degree program Students specialize in a subject area (e.g. Animal Health, Fisheries). Requirement to achieve measurable poverty reduction outcomes “Examiners” include farmers and poor families
  23. 23. Fitness for purposeDeveloping a fitness for purpose approach toprofessional education for poverty reduction
  24. 24. Measuring impact at the community level Did this course lead to a measurable reduction in poverty? A “fitness for purpose” approach to education Examples  Increased availability of nutrients in diet  Increased knowledge for treating goat health problems  New crops planted  New sources of protein (frogs, insects) farmed
  25. 25. Quality Assurance Board Comprising 2 – 3 members from all stakeholders Each PRAM course delivery institution has its own QA and curriculum development committee Two-way process
  26. 26. PRAM poverty reduction framework Lao National Poverty Eradication Strategy 2020 Goal Poverty Reduction Fund responsibility MAF responsibility (with other Ministries/agencies) Improving Employment Providing Basic Needs livelihoods opportunities Poorest Poor Not poorStudent indicators for learning success Small but sustainable increases Families with an in living standards of families income equivalent Housing and of >180,000 Kip clothing within 47 poorest districts of Laos per person per Health and month Schools and Measurable impacts on the sanitation Food education livelihoods and well-being of Families impacted security poor families beyond the by student provision of their Basic Needs activities will NOT Community be used to participation Roads access and Measurable changes that can be measure learning and action communication independently verified by local success communities and external evaluators The 6 Basic Needs
  27. 27. The 6 Basic Needs Food security  Enough food for basic requirements (2100KCal/person/day, importance of fat in diet of young children to absorb vitamins)  Enough food for entire year  Food supply not highly vulnerable  Importance of building resilience in food supply to combat climate variation and climate change  Importance of poor communities to recover food supply quickly from external “shocks” or disasters  Focus of PRAM student projects
  28. 28. The 6 Basic Needs Health and sanitation  Access to clean and safe water  Access to health care services  Importance of developing security to health care service access (ability to “pay” for family health care when there is a critical need)  Health care “micro- insurance” through securing livestock health
  29. 29. The 6 Basic Needs Schools and education  Basic access to primary education  Includes ensuring effectiveness of basic school education  Includes non-formal education and training, access to new information and learning to ensure provision of Basic Needs  Includes effectiveness of awareness raising and learning to exploit new opportunities for basic survival
  30. 30. The 6 Basic Needs Housing and clothing  Ensuring families have basic shelter and sufficient clothing all year  Importance of improving resilience to increasing climate variation. Shelter less vulnerable to flooding and storms  Importance of families having a secure place to live  Importance of having basic cooking and household equipment
  31. 31. The 6 Basic Needs Roads, access and communication  The importance of developing reliable contact with the “outside” to reduce vulnerability  Includes basic access to buses and having money to travel for emergencies (e.g. health)  Developing effective access to basic government services
  32. 32. The 6 Basic Needs Community participation and action  Ensuring ability to effectively participate in development  Developing opportunities to be innovative and creative (take small risks for improvements)  Importance of ensuring communities and individuals are able to take responsibility for improvements  The importance of the capacity for community mobilization and organization
  33. 33. Some lessons learnedAn overview of the lessons learned by the PRAMstakeholders over the last three years
  34. 34. The need for a local-level focus  Savannakhet University  DLF/MAF lead process, but difficult to coordinate  Necessary for local coordination (local university)  Local university issue degree  Need to focus at lowest level of staff and poor areas  Poor districts  Jut Sum  Technical Service Centers (TSC’s)
  35. 35. International partnerships The Wetlands Alliance  AIT, CORIN-ASIA, WWF, World Fish  Role changed, need to accommodate change  Difficult to understand, complicated Thai agencies  Local-local collaboration very effective  MoU useful for administration  Vocational vision very useful  Easy to find good lessons for students and information  Language differences small (compared with English) Donor organizations  Flexibility and understanding from Sida (supportive donor)  PRAM designed for easy donor support  International NGO approach different (project approach)
  36. 36. Facilitating partnerships Important attributes  Ability to identify new opportunities  Neutrality, respected  Informed, but independent Breaking with traditions  “Technical” input requirment  Focus on establishing process not output  Curriculum content locally derived  Facilitation skills central importance:  partnership development  workplan development  monitoring (Quality Assurance)  goal/objective reinforcement
  37. 37. DLF perspective of PRAM institutional partnerships National University of Champasak Na Gair Agricultural Pakse Agricultural Laos/SavannakhetProvincial Authorities College College University Salavan Provincial MAF Personnel Authorities National and Regional coordination Department Attapue Provincial Savannakhet province Department of Authorities WAP Provincial coordination for Vocational Education Southern Laos Xe Kong Provincial MAF Planning Department Northern province Planned Authorities WAP Provincial coordination for Department of Kammouane Northern Laos AgronomyProvincial Authorities DLF Luang Prabang Planned Bolikhamsai WAP National coordination Provincial AuthoritiesProvincial Authorities Xieng Kuang Provincial Authorities SavannakhetProvincial Authorities International coordination WAP SecretariatPrivate Sector – CAAT MAF Bilateral donors UDICAD SEAFDEC World Bank/ADB
  38. 38. Supporting teaching development Opportunities  to test and develop new approaches  re-evaluate learner needs Project/Problem-based learning  appropriate for (MAF) professional development  similar to development agency “capacity building” Developing confidence  Only one of the ways to do this  Key element for effective development  Importance underestimated
  39. 39. Supporting QA development The need for regional/international certification/quality assurance Jointly developing “fitness for purpose” concept Development of a Quality Assurance Board (QAB) Facilitating continuous quality improvement Merging “development” QA with education QA  Exams, student assignments, academic assesments  Logical Framework (OVI’s)  Most Significant Change (MSC)
  40. 40. Future directions and challengesSome ideas for developing the PRAM initiativeand issues that need to be addressed forscaling-up
  41. 41. Regional expansion On-going dialogue to establish PRAM- like programs in Philippines, East Timor, Thailand, Burma and Vietnam Cambodia  Fisheries administration (part of MAFF) will:  Organize a national meeting to discuss how to initiate PRAM in Cambodia  Open discussions with national universities to develop collaboration of a PRAM initiative  Draft PRAM project proposal and invite PRAM stakeholders from Laos to share ideas and submit jointly to donors
  42. 42. The challenge of learning from the past and eachother  How can students learn from past students?  How can teachers learn from past teachers?  How can we empower students, give them the big picture - that there are others like them - how do you link them?
  43. 43. The challenge of information and recordsmanagement  What is the best way to collect and manage the assessment information coming from teachers and students?  What is the best way to record and store Significant Change Stories?  How can pictures and videos best be stored and shared?  Where is the best place to keep student records?  Where do we keep records of meetings and agreements on approach and methodology?
  44. 44. The challenge of communication Teachers wish they had easier way to contact students How can communication be improved teacher-teacher, student-student, teacher-student? Teachers were impressed by students from different areas working together on their projects How can teachers get more real-time information from the students?
  45. 45. Thank younickudon@gmail.com

×