INFORMATIONLITERACYASSESSMENT:FROM THE CLASSROOMTO THE CURRICULUMSara Miller - October 11, 2012
WHAT IS ASSESSMENT, EXACTLY? Figuring out what you want to know Figuring out how you can know it Collecting data to tha...
WHAT IS ASSESSMENT NOT? Vindication: an attempt to prove or justify something Evaluation: an immediate measure of your w...
WHAT IS DATA? Pieces of information that are captured or recorded. Not just numbers. Qualitative data counts too. You m...
TODAY’S AGENDA: Teaching and Learning Assessment Program Assessment Institutional Level Assessment
INSTRUCTIONAL ASSESSMENT:WHAT DO WE WANT TO KNOW? Is my teaching effective? Are students learning? WHAT are students le...
TWO TYPES OF INSTRUCTIONALASSESSMENT Formative helps along the way    Asking: what do you still have questions about?   ...
LEARNING OUTCOMES Outcomes are specific and measurable Outcomes are guides for a sessions’s structure, content, and  tea...
WHAT’S THE IDEAL? In an ideal world, what would you like these students to be able to  do? What steps would they need to...
CATS – CLASSROOM ASSESSMENTTECHNIQUES One minute free write         Show two sources, use Poll “Muddiest Point”        ...
USING COURSE ASSESSMENTS Final papers or projects Feedback from students Pre and post session quiz or questionnaire
REMEMBER: If you assess the outcome and it’s not met – this is OK This could mean:    It’s not achievable in the time y...
INTERACTIVE TIME Brainstorm and write down some new ways that you could use  CATs in your own class. You can do this on y...
PROGRAM LEVEL ASSESSMENT What do you want to know regarding the work that you do with  your library unit or campus depart...
WHERE CAN YOU FINDOUTCOMES? Accreditation standards for your discipline Program outcomes (ex. First Year Writing) Depar...
MSU NURSING
INSTITUTIONAL LEVELASSESSMENT What questions exist at the institutional level?    How do the Libraries affect student le...
INSTITUTIONAL LEVELASSESSMENT UG Learning Outcomes – Rubric Assessment Standardized testing – SAILS, iSKILLS, ILT Curri...
Analytical Thinking – The MSU graduates uses ways of knowing from mathematics, natural sciences, social sciences, humaniti...
TO SUM UP What do you want to know about your instruction, or other liaison  efforts? How can you tie your work in to yo...
HELPFUL SOURCESMSU Undergraduate Learning Outcomes (formerly Liberal Learning Goals)http://undergrad.msu.edu/learningOakle...
Information Literacy Assessment: From the Classroom to the Curriculum
Information Literacy Assessment: From the Classroom to the Curriculum
Information Literacy Assessment: From the Classroom to the Curriculum
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Information Literacy Assessment: From the Classroom to the Curriculum

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  • In it’s basest form, It’s gathering and recording information.
  • Assessment should be objective.If you’re going to make evaluative decisions, you need to have done an assessment to provide you with data to base them on.Data need to be interpreted in order to understand what they mean.Doesn’t always have to highlight effectiveness or ineffectiveness. Assessment CAN be the first step in determining these things. Data can be used in all sorts of ways, but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be collected. Blissful ignorance is tempting sometimes, but dangerous as it never leads to innovation or improvement!
  • Do you get the “anecdotal” slam? Write it down as it happens and it’s not anecdotal anymore.
  • Teaching/learning – for classes and student interactionProgram – can use to look at certain areas such as liaison, reference, etc.Write things on your worksheet
  • Ask people what they want to know about their classes.The hardest part of assessment is figuring out what you really want to know. These are ALL things that can be assessed. Some are harder than others, but they can be done. Assessment takes work, so make sure that it’s what you REALLY want to know. If it is, it should be worth assessing.
  • Formative mostly involves your teachingSummative involves learning
  • These are how we determine exactly what it is that we want to measure. It also determines how we teach.Specific: not “understand the library” or “know about databases.” How will you measure those things? They help you keep on track, design, focus, and pare out any uneccessary contentTech – it’s a cool toy, but will it help me meet my learning outcomes? How might I use it in a way that addresses the outcomes?
  • You can collect worksheets!These are mostly formativeDifferent methods you can use to collect data, depending on what you want to know. There’s more than just assessment going on here – it’s part of the whole design of class. If tech can help you assess what you’re after, great – if not, use something else. GOOGLE FORM in libguideFor more, see:http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/teaching-guides/assessment/cats/ and book at end.
  • If you can collaborate with instructors, even better! Seeing student work is extremely helpful and you might even have some suggestions. Final projects: rubrics, source or citation analysis, bibliography check, reflection
  • This can work to your advantage. Remember it’s data… not evaluation.
  • Some accrediation standards include information literacy, specifically.
  • MSU Mechanical Engineering Program Outcomes – these are required for accreditation
  • Student learning concept, even gives specific course where it’s addressed. I know Heidi is involved in this course. If you weren’t, and found something like this, you could contact that prof and offer your services.
  • ACRL Value of Academic Libraries report
  • Drawbacks of learning outcomes rubrics -Easily misinterpreted-No clear vision yet as to how to use for assessment purposesDrawbacks of standardized testing:-Not adaptable to locally-generated outcomes-Not holistic or contextual-Need campuswide buy-in and staff time-Expensivei.e. we’re paying a lot of money to see if students meet an outcome that’s not really ours… or if they do well on a testDrawbacks of curriculum mapping:-MSU is far too big for this to happen-Need buy-in across campus
  • Cross-disciplinary, intentionally. What does this look like in your discipline? What are you already doing that fits into some of these categories?
  • Are students learning? If so, what? Is my teaching approach effective? What can I do differently? Are there different ways to approach liaison that could yield more benefits?Reflective reading?
  • Value of Acad Libs ReportMSU UGOsCATS book
  • Information Literacy Assessment: From the Classroom to the Curriculum

    1. 1. INFORMATIONLITERACYASSESSMENT:FROM THE CLASSROOMTO THE CURRICULUMSara Miller - October 11, 2012
    2. 2. WHAT IS ASSESSMENT, EXACTLY? Figuring out what you want to know Figuring out how you can know it Collecting data to that end
    3. 3. WHAT IS ASSESSMENT NOT? Vindication: an attempt to prove or justify something Evaluation: an immediate measure of your worth, value, or effectiveness Automatically going to tell you that you suck.
    4. 4. WHAT IS DATA? Pieces of information that are captured or recorded. Not just numbers. Qualitative data counts too. You might already have a lot more sources of data than you realize.
    5. 5. TODAY’S AGENDA: Teaching and Learning Assessment Program Assessment Institutional Level Assessment
    6. 6. INSTRUCTIONAL ASSESSMENT:WHAT DO WE WANT TO KNOW? Is my teaching effective? Are students learning? WHAT are students learning?From another perspective: Is students’ approach to research changing? How? Could the way I teach reinforce negative student habits? Could it have a positive affect on changing those?Really specific: Can students articulate the differences between a popular and scholarly article? Does taking students on a building tour increase the likelihood of a favorable attitude toward the library?
    7. 7. TWO TYPES OF INSTRUCTIONALASSESSMENT Formative helps along the way  Asking: what do you still have questions about?  In-class clicker questions Summative is assessing after the fact; cumulative.  Paper, project, or bibliography  Final exam
    8. 8. LEARNING OUTCOMES Outcomes are specific and measurable Outcomes are guides for a sessions’s structure, content, and teaching methods (pedagogy) Outcomes can be talking points for faculty – especially when expectations for a session are unrealistic.
    9. 9. WHAT’S THE IDEAL? In an ideal world, what would you like these students to be able to do? What steps would they need to take in order to be able to do those things? Can you address any of these steps through your instruction? How many or how few? How do you know if the students can do them? (hint: that last part is assessment!)
    10. 10. CATS – CLASSROOM ASSESSMENTTECHNIQUES One minute free write  Show two sources, use Poll “Muddiest Point” Everywhere or clickers to vote on more appropriate Class discussion source Worksheets  Compare Google vs. Google Think-pair-share or group Scholar search results review  Hoax website experience Concept maps  Create rubric as a class or Groups evaluate source and group present to class  Google form
    11. 11. USING COURSE ASSESSMENTS Final papers or projects Feedback from students Pre and post session quiz or questionnaire
    12. 12. REMEMBER: If you assess the outcome and it’s not met – this is OK This could mean:  It’s not achievable in the time you are allotted  There are too many other things going on in class which crowd out focusing on achieving the outcome  It’s not achievable by the current methods being used in class  Or… several other things.
    13. 13. INTERACTIVE TIME Brainstorm and write down some new ways that you could use CATs in your own class. You can do this on your own or feel free to talk to those around you.
    14. 14. PROGRAM LEVEL ASSESSMENT What do you want to know regarding the work that you do with your library unit or campus department?  How is my liaison work going? What effect is it having?  Is my instruction lining up with course, program, or other outcomes? Do these outcomes even exist?
    15. 15. WHERE CAN YOU FINDOUTCOMES? Accreditation standards for your discipline Program outcomes (ex. First Year Writing) Departmental/Unit mission statements and Gs and Os MSU Undergraduate Learning Outcomes
    16. 16. MSU NURSING
    17. 17. INSTITUTIONAL LEVELASSESSMENT What questions exist at the institutional level?  How do the Libraries affect student learning at MSU?  At what point in their education are MSU students learning information literacy skills?  What value do the Libraries – our services and collections – have for the University as a whole?
    18. 18. INSTITUTIONAL LEVELASSESSMENT UG Learning Outcomes – Rubric Assessment Standardized testing – SAILS, iSKILLS, ILT Curriculum Mapping
    19. 19. Analytical Thinking – The MSU graduates uses ways of knowing from mathematics, natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and arts toaccess information and critically analyzes complex material in order to evaluate evidence, construct reasoned arguments, and communicateinferences and conclusions. Emerging Developing Proficient Exemplary Acquires, analyzes, Seeks information from basic Retrieves information from a Designs and implements Uses analysis to defend and evaluates types of sources with minimal limited range of sources and effective strategies to find information choices and reach information from regard for relevance or identifies biases, strengths, relevant sources based on original conclusions. multiple sources quality. and weaknesses within those purpose. Critiques biases, sources. strengths, and weaknesses of information sources. Synthesizes and Recognizes multiple Identifies how information can Examines and integrates Creates a defensible, applies information perspectives among sources be conceptualized differently relevant information sources compelling work using within and across of information. within various disciplines. from multiple disciplinary multiple disciplinary disciplines perspectives. perspectives. Identifies and Recognizes the need for and Identifies a range of Selects quantitative methods Critiques biases, strengths, and applies, as performs basic quantitative quantitative methods and for making sound judgments weaknesses of quantitative appropriate, methods. employs them to make and drawing plausible approaches to reflect on quantitative judgments. conclusions based on the conclusions and propose situation. responses to a situation. methods for defining and responding to problems Identifies the Recognizes a range of inquiry Describes the effective use of Judges if methods are credible Selects inquiry methods credibility, use and methods and acknowledges methods and identifies their and ethical in given contexts. ethically and with an misuse of scientific, that they can be misused. misuse in a given contexts. understanding of the humanistic and consequences of their misuse. artistic methods
    20. 20. TO SUM UP What do you want to know about your instruction, or other liaison efforts? How can you tie your work in to your discipline’s goals or outcomes? Are there larger forces at work that can guide what you’re doing? How can you find out?
    21. 21. HELPFUL SOURCESMSU Undergraduate Learning Outcomes (formerly Liberal Learning Goals)http://undergrad.msu.edu/learningOakleaf, M. (2010). The Value of Academic Libraries: A ComprehensiveResearch Review and Report, American Library Association.http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/issues/value/val_report.pdfAngelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: Ahandbook for college teachers. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.LB2822.75 .A54 1993 c.2

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