Butoke

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Butoke

  1. 1. 2010 A Program Approach to Rural Development based on an NGO in The Democratic Republic of Congo
  2. 2. Can you help?
  3. 3. Democratic Republic of Congo
  4. 4. Democratic Republic of Congo  In Central Africa, right on the Equator  40% of the surface area of USA  Average population density 52/ sq. mile  One of the five least developed countries  Great mineral wealth cause of 15 yr. war  More than 5 million direct and indirect civilian war deaths since 1994 and counting.  Per capita income $ 171  Elected government weak and dysfunctional
  5. 5. Western Kasai
  6. 6. Western Kasai  Area 60,605 sq. miles  Three districts: – Lulua, in the savannah grassland. – Kasai, in the forest. – Kananga in deforested savannah, partially urbanized  2.5 million inhabitants, of which 900,000 in Kananga  Average population density 26 /sq.mile outside the capital  Epicenter of epidemics: ebola, monkey pox rabies
  7. 7. Western Kasai Forest
  8. 8. Grassland
  9. 9. Kananga
  10. 10. Food Security and Nutrition in Western Kasai  Pre-famine phase 3 in 6 territories out of 10  9 - 17 % acute malnutrition in children under 5years  In all territories 20% or more of women too thin,10% are acutely malnourished
  11. 11. Food security rating Situation de la sécurité Alimentaire au Kasaï Occidental d’Août 2008 à Mars 2009 Résultats de l’IPC 2009 N e, f B, D 630.668 e,f, h A, C, D DEKESE i 2 116.838 i e, f, h 3 *** A, B, C, D 588.707 i *** 3 MWEKA ILEBO *** e, h B, D d,g, h 141.884 B, C, D i 325.837 1 DEMBA i DIMBELENGE LUEBO 3 *** KANANGA *** e, f, g B, D e,f, h 398.677 KAZUMBA DIBAYA B, C, D TSHIKAPA 698.119 i 2 i 1 ** ** f, g LUIZA h B, C, D B, D 1.546.836 491.508 i i 2 g, h 3 B, C, D f, g, h 555.903 B, C, D ** ** i 645.754 1 i 2 *** *** Phase 2.shp Risque élevé Risque modéré Phase 3 30 0 30 60 Kilometers LEGENDE Phase actuelle ou imminente Risque d’aggravation 3 Crise alimentaire et des moyens d’existence aiguë Risque modéré Risque élevé 2 Insécurité alimentaire modérée/limite d ; e ; f ; g et h = Principales causes immédiates : A ; B ; C ; D = Principales causes sous-jacentes : d : insécurité civile ; e : désorganisation du marché ; A : Séquelles des conflits ; B : Dégradation de l’environnement ; f : foyers de maladie ; g : afflux de population ; h : autres. C : Marginalisation Sociale ; D : autres Chiffres : population du territoire/ entité 1 ; 2 ; 3 = Récurrence de la crise dans les 10 dernières années i ; ii ; iii ; iv ; v = Critères de ciblage social : 1 : faible (1 à 2 ans) ; 2 : moyenne (3 à 4) ; 3 : forte (> à 5) i : Système de moyens d’existence = Tendance prévue * =Niveau de confiance de l’analyse : ** Moyen *** Elevé Sans changement Aggravation de la situation
  12. 12. Social Context  Between war and peace since 15 years, more than 5 million direct and indirect victims  Frequent migration seeking security and livelihood or driven from neighbouring Angola  Unemployment affects 95% of adult men and increasing under world economic crisis  Women and children are property of husband and the men in his family
  13. 13. Social Context  Violence even lynching by mobs upon first time accusation of witchcraft  Witchcraft paradigm leads to grades of long term discrimination against widows, elderly, orphans, malnourished children, chronically ill and handicapped .
  14. 14. Young woman accused of `witchcraft `whose mother brother and child had died, 48 h after attempted lynching
  15. 15. Dr Jean Lumbala with the woman who saved the `witch` from lynching
  16. 16. Aged Man malnourished and accused
  17. 17. Byuma declared a `witch` in 2007
  18. 18. Byuma in 2010
  19. 19. AIDS orphans declared `witches`by their mam
  20. 20. Advocating HR of women and children
  21. 21. Church women on HR
  22. 22. Social Context  Literacy and formal education in decline  Birth rate and child and maternal mortality increasing
  23. 23. Agriculture  Agriculture not supported by government  Extensive agriculture using hand tools in small plots of 1/6 to 1/3 acre per family  Minimal trading and commerce – No markets for agricultural supplies and produce  Agricultural potential limited: – sandy soil in Lulua district and Kananga – Absence of high quality seeds – clay soil and fear of sleeping sickness in Kasai district – Irregular rainfall, lack of irrigation, variable micro- climates
  24. 24. Agriculture  Women carry heaviest workload in agriculture  Transportation:  Bad roads dangerous for cars  women and children on foot carrying heavy loads  men pushing bicycles long distances up to 150 miles
  25. 25. Women and children on foot carrying heavy loads
  26. 26. Bad roads
  27. 27. Malnutrition  Lack of food security in towns and even more so in the villages  Due to actual lack of food as well as transportation problems and speculation by suppliers  Severe malnutrition in 9 to 25 percent of children under 5; elevated rates of nutritional dwarfism.
  28. 28. Malnutrition  Season of witches, September – December, seasonal food shortage leads to high mortality in children, elderly and handicapped people leading to multiple new accusations of witchcraft
  29. 29. Conditions favorable for an NGO Program Approach to Rural Development  Strong pressure in favor of development efforts by – rural associations – people who are most marginalized – traditional chiefs – church leaders  Some provincial authorities in 2004, responsive to popular pressure, have sought to support NGO activities
  30. 30. Communities
  31. 31. Initiators
  32. 32. BUTOKE: Objective  BUTOKE gives priority to integrated rural development, social peace and the promotion of equity by collaborating with civil society including faith-based organizations and village associations in each locality so that all can participate in the efforts and all can benefit.
  33. 33. Development Efforts  Longterm 5-15 years  Good but not overabundant baseline statistics  Monitor, flexibility of tactics, learn as you go  Stability of personnel  Core Community participation in planning, monitoring and evaluating
  34. 34. Humanitarian Assistance  Sudden problem surpassing local capacity to deal with independently: accidents, epidemics  Speed of intervention  Use agreed upon procedures for quality care  Minimum data gathering: where, number of people involved in orders of magnitude, who else can assist with what  Flexible administrative procedures  Available logistics  Monitoring and evaluation
  35. 35. Neighbours and ex patients join as workers
  36. 36. Top notch Technicians join
  37. 37. Community Nutrition Center
  38. 38. Malnourished and orphans have discovered a grandma
  39. 39. Nolonger alone
  40. 40. Nutritional dwarfism
  41. 41. Marasmus
  42. 42. Kwashiorkor
  43. 43. Kwashiorkor
  44. 44. Kwashiorkor
  45. 45. A normal child (center) with two malnourished children of same age (37 mos.)
  46. 46. Byuma in 2007
  47. 47. Byuma in 2010
  48. 48. Food Security and Nutrition Strategies 1. Short term support for lasting effects, e.g simple tools, seeds, to stimulate the agricultural cycle
  49. 49. Food Security and Nutrition 2. Introduce and support simple low- cost innovations  selection of better seeds,  careful planting with proper spacing  weeding at the correct time
  50. 50. Food Security and Nutrition Strategies 3. Reach large numbers of people through village associations and parishes
  51. 51. Food Security and Nutrition Strategies 4. Encourage increased production of staple foods with improved varieties of corn and cassava
  52. 52. Food Security and Nutrition Strategies 5. Encourage varied diets, rich in protein and vitamins by including cultivation of peanuts, soy, lentils, watermelon, vegetables
  53. 53. Food Security and Nutrition Strategies 6. Maintain dialogue with parishes and associations on strategies and ethics of development with equity
  54. 54. Food Security and Nutrition Strategies 7. Feeding Programs: Most people get only one meal per day that is bulky and of low nutritional quality ….
  55. 55. Butoke feeds daily about 100 children and adolescents and adults, with moderate to severe acute malnutrition 3 – 12 times per day
  56. 56. Number of Associations Formed and Acres Under Cultivation Each Season, 2004 - 2009 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 2004a 2004b 2005a 2005b 2006a 2006b 2007 2008 2009
  57. 57. Health  Access to medical care  Malnutrition  Disability
  58. 58. Access to Medical care  Medical and surgical emergencies (1,500 cases per year)  Primary health care (5,000 cases per year)
  59. 59. Many emergencies are turned away from hospitals for lack of ability to pay. BUTOKE provides money and an advocate …
  60. 60. … who assists hospital patients get access to needed health care.
  61. 61. Complex emergency 8 y old daughter brought by her father who is a pastor. who tried prayer and traditional care
  62. 62. That she may live  Infection, cancer. and burn by traditional treatment
  63. 63. Victim of an attempted murder. BUTOKE helped get her into hospital for treatment
  64. 64. BUTOKE staff provide simple basic care
  65. 65. Disability In a situation where survival is often uncertain anyhow, disabilities further impair an individual's chances. Disabled people are stigmatized because they are considered to be probable witches
  66. 66. the elderly and disabled arrive on bicycles by Samaritans
  67. 67. Paraplegics have been supplied with simple locally- made hand- propelled tricycles that greatly increase their mobility
  68. 68. Rehabilitation enables a disabled person to play a more active role in community life
  69. 69. Many people with disabilities are at special disadvantage. Existing services provide no social rehabilitation nor pastoral care. Butoke provides all of these. This man was provided a sewing machine, which enabled him to develop a new livlihood as a tailor.
  70. 70. Loving care  Kapinga, orphan 24 y Handicapped (TB hip)  `Witch`  Tried prostitution but came malnourished and begging  Became major loving caretaker of smallest orphans
  71. 71. Education  Support for school fees and notebooks and pens, without which children cannot attend private or government schools
  72. 72. 800 700 600 500 400 Series1 300 200 100 0 Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Children supported by BUTOKE in primary and secondary schools
  73. 73. BUTOKE: the Future  Delayed support by CIDA. Uncertain support by UN because of uncertainty of their budgetary support  Maintain efforts towards economic and social equity through affiliated associations  Continue the orphanage with 42 children  Maintain the health care and emergency care  Continue defending human rights of witches
  74. 74. How you can help  Stay informed about Africa and DR Congo  Pray for BUTOKE and the people of the Congo in these times where major support from UN and bilaterals are disturbed by the world wide economic crisis and political turbulence  Help us by sustaining our work to support – Orphans and malnourished – Food Security – Emergency Health care for indigents – Educational support for primary school - Protection of Human rights of so called witches
  75. 75. Donations Send contributions, payable to “Maryland Presbyterian Church” to BUTOKE’s agent in the USA: Maryland Presbyterian Church 1105 Providence Road Baltimore, MD 21286-1744

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