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“It’s only through
moments of reflection
that our greatest insights,
ideas and quite frankly
what it means to be
human hap...
This Readitfor.me 

Remarkable Business // Remarkable Life 

interview is with Daniel Forrester. 

He’s the founder of THR...
?W hen did you first get the itch to become an entrepreneur?
My sister Rosemary, used to do these candy drives
at her school. The more chocolate bars you sell,
the more money is raise...
I was fearless as a kid going door to door. BrEne Brown says
that you have to allow yourself to be vulnerable, and I had
a...
?W hat was it like for the first few months running that 

business, stepping out on your own, what did you learn 

from t...
You experience ambiguity and the
realization of how small you are. 

At my old company I had people that I
could turn to f...
In that moment what I chose

to do is to focus on the client, focus
on the value and dream so that first
60 days was a lit...
?W hat do you think entrepreneurs should be doing

in order to be building their remarkable business?
The first one is based on the book
Consider, which I wrote a few years
ago. I had a very simple idea: 

that it’s only thr...
The world around us, with always-on technology and
connectedness is slowly making us lose that idea. So my
first bit of ad...
The second thing I often
think about is this idea of
creating things that are
remarkable and new. I
worked with General
Pe...
The last thing I’m learning is something
that my father taught me incredibly
well. He said life comes down to people.
A co...
The last thing in the world that I wanted
was someone who agreed with me. So quite
honestly, the ability to have dissent,
...
?W hat’s your best pieces of advice for entrepreneurs 

who are also trying to lead a remarkable life?
I don’t think a remarkable life can happen
unless you get better at being able to switch
between family and work modes. Wh...
An entrepreneur’s world,
especially in the early stages,
forces a reset of priorities. I
struggle with it. I think my
rema...
Then there’s Validation. I think
there is a very unhealthy side to
the American psyche of our quest
for fame. It makes you...
So my remarkable life
is one in which you
come to grips with the
tonic of validation and
can seek something
that moves you...
as an entrepreneur I’ve made a ton of mistakes. Those mistakes have
economic consequences, in fact, they have all sorts of...
An entrepreneur is
called to be a risk
taker, but the
journey of growth is
going to be filled
with how well you
curate you...
Learn more about Daniel Forrester:
www.thruue.com
www.danielforrester.com
Twitter: @dpforrester
WILL YOU TAKE OUR 

1% personal
development 

pledge?
Commit JUST 1% of your working
hours each month to your personal
and...
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Readitfor.me interview with Daniel Forrester

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Readitfor.me interview with Daniel Forrester

  1. 1. “It’s only through moments of reflection that our greatest insights, ideas and quite frankly what it means to be human happens.” Remarkable ideas from Daniel Forrester
  2. 2. This Readitfor.me 
 Remarkable Business // Remarkable Life 
 interview is with Daniel Forrester. 
 He’s the founder of THRUUE Inc. which is devoted to the intersection of culture & strategy, and he’s published a book called Consider. He’s a speaker, a reflective thinker, husband, and father…
  3. 3. ?W hen did you first get the itch to become an entrepreneur?
  4. 4. My sister Rosemary, used to do these candy drives at her school. The more chocolate bars you sell, the more money is raised for the school. I quickly saw an opportunity to help her accelerate her sales, and there was a $100 reward for the top salesperson. I single handedly took and helped her win that award a couple of times in a row and we split the money together. That $50 incentive was very interesting to me 
 when I was 10. $50!
  5. 5. I was fearless as a kid going door to door. BrEne Brown says that you have to allow yourself to be vulnerable, and I had an early inclination to do that.
  6. 6. ?W hat was it like for the first few months running that 
 business, stepping out on your own, what did you learn 
 from that experience?
  7. 7. You experience ambiguity and the realization of how small you are. 
 At my old company I had people that I could turn to for legal, technology, business development… and when you are on your own there’s an amazing moment of loneliness 
 that you get when 
 the buck stops with you.
  8. 8. In that moment what I chose
 to do is to focus on the client, focus on the value and dream so that first 60 days was a little bit of scrappiness. In that first 60 - 90 days I learned to manage fear. Becoming an entrepreneur is all about that. You can’t conquer fear but you can manage fear and talk to 
 yourself and say where do 
 we go with this.
  9. 9. ?W hat do you think entrepreneurs should be doing
 in order to be building their remarkable business?
  10. 10. The first one is based on the book Consider, which I wrote a few years ago. I had a very simple idea: 
 that it’s only through moments of reflection that our greatest insights, ideas and quite frankly what it means to be human happens.
  11. 11. The world around us, with always-on technology and connectedness is slowly making us lose that idea. So my first bit of advice would be around reflection and valuing it. If you have a constant bias towards action and activity, and you’re not doing the habitual step back and considering what happened, why are we doing this, and not giving yourself space to dream… you’re missing out.
  12. 12. The second thing I often think about is this idea of creating things that are remarkable and new. I worked with General Petraeus for several years as I was writing my book. He said that the first job of a leader is to get the big ideas right. These big ideas do not just fall from the tree easily: they take time, 
 they take reflection.
  13. 13. The last thing I’m learning is something that my father taught me incredibly well. He said life comes down to people. A company with the greatest technology in the world, the fanciest apps or a consulting company with the wildest set of new analytic thinking… make no mistake you know this is going to come down to the people that are around me, the people that are quite frankly thinking differently than me.
  14. 14. The last thing in the world that I wanted was someone who agreed with me. So quite honestly, the ability to have dissent, healthy discussion and dialogue is probably the thing that I am nurturing and for as long as I get to run this we’re going to be a company of dialogue and give and take and a company that respects the people in it and if I get that wrong… I think it’s all going to fall apart.
  15. 15. ?W hat’s your best pieces of advice for entrepreneurs 
 who are also trying to lead a remarkable life?
  16. 16. I don’t think a remarkable life can happen unless you get better at being able to switch between family and work modes. When I’m in work I’m in, and I try to be very present for everything that is in front of me because that is what I’m called to do. WORK LIFE BALANCE
  17. 17. An entrepreneur’s world, especially in the early stages, forces a reset of priorities. I struggle with it. I think my remarkable life will be the intersection between the joy of the work that I do and the joy that is in front of me from the people I love the most.
  18. 18. Then there’s Validation. I think there is a very unhealthy side to the American psyche of our quest for fame. It makes you think to yourself am I doing things because I’m able to 
 validate myself? 
 Life has given me more 
 validation and more 
 meaning with two beautiful children and a wife than I 
 could imagine.
  19. 19. So my remarkable life is one in which you come to grips with the tonic of validation and can seek something that moves your soul and taps at the more deeper core of who you are. For me that journey of validation is about being conscious of all the unhealthiness that comes my way and not seeking it out. JUDGE ME WELL (please) (please) (please) (please) (please)
  20. 20. as an entrepreneur I’ve made a ton of mistakes. Those mistakes have economic consequences, in fact, they have all sorts of consequences. The learning is that my growth is to be found by taking a big step back and asking how did I make that mistake. Not just 
 because I don’t want to repeat them, but also because There is something in my mind that would have wanted me 
 to keep going down 
 that 
 path.
  21. 21. An entrepreneur is called to be a risk taker, but the journey of growth is going to be filled with how well you curate your way around the mistakes and learning and getting feedback and getting yourself back up and keeping going.
  22. 22. Learn more about Daniel Forrester: www.thruue.com www.danielforrester.com Twitter: @dpforrester
  23. 23. WILL YOU TAKE OUR 
 1% personal development 
 pledge? Commit JUST 1% of your working hours each month to your personal and professional development. If you do, we will create a $1,000 scholarship to Readitfor.me for a grade or high school student.
  24. 24. Best-selling business books turned into 12-minute animated videos

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