Episode 260: The Seven Steps to Rescuing the Problem Project

350 views

Published on

We begin the interview by looking at what makes government projects uniquely susceptible to a higher failure rate than private sector projects and then move into seven steps that Todd recommends for recovering a troubled project.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
350
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Episode 260: The Seven Steps to Rescuing the Problem Project

  1. 1. Episode 260: The Seven Steps to Rescuing the Problem Project (Free) PMI, PMP, CAPM, PgMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-SP, PMI-RMP and PMBOK are trademarks of the Project Management Institute, Inc. PMI has not endorsed and did not participate in the development of this publication. PMI does not sponsor this publication and makes no warranty, guarantee or representation, expressed or implied as to the accuracy or content. Every attempt has been made by OSP International LLC to ensure that the information presented in this publication is accurate and can serve as preparation for the PMP certification exam. However, OSP International LLC accepts no legal responsibility for the content herein. This document should be used only as a reference and not as a replacement for officially published material. Using the information from this document does not guarantee that the reader will pass the PMP certification exam. No such guarantees or warranties are implied or expressed by OSP International LLC.
  2. 2. 2 It seemed that the final weeks of 2013, project management was on everyone’s mind. And not in a good way. The roll-out of the affordable care act website really brought to light that substandard project performance can have a disastrous effect on public perception. While we often hear about failed government projects, failed private sector projects seem to fly under the radar.
  3. 3. 3 In this interview we welcome Todd C. Williams (http://ecaminc.com/ - http://www.linkedin.com/in/backfromred) has spent the past 25 years advising Fortune 500 companies on what to do about projects that are either headed for a cliff or have already gone over.
  4. 4. 4 We begin the interview by looking at what makes government projects uniquely susceptible to a higher failure rate than private sector projects and then move into seven steps that Todd recommends for recovering a troubled project.
  5. 5. 5 The following are the first few pages of the transcript. Hello Todd and welcome back to The Project Management Podcast™! Oh, welcome Cornelius. Hope you're having a great day!
  6. 6. 6 Cornelius Fichtner: I am, thank you very much. But it seems to me that there are some people out there who are not having a great day because we are hearing a lot about seemingly failed projects especially from the public sector these days and that's why we have brought you on because one of your expertise is turning projects around. So tell me, are government projects more likely to fail than the ones in the private sector?
  7. 7. 7 Todd C. Williams: Well, I think in general, no. But they definitely get a lot more visibility. I mean nothing spells a day worse than having CNN at your front door when you get up in the morning which I think has probably happened to a lot of people when we look at healthcare.gov, what's going on with the traffic control, with all the other projects that are out there. But I think that you'll also see that there are other projects that are equally as bad in that it's places out there like the Boeing 787. I mean how many years late was it. Once it got flying then it started having batteries which just kind of spontaneously catch on fire. Those projects do seem to hit both the private and public sector. I think the private sector by just the nature of the name was able to keep it a little more private.
  8. 8. 8 Cornelius Fichtner: Are there any characteristics, any components that favor one type of project over the others in regards to success? Todd C. Williams: Well I do think that the private sector projects do have one very nice feature about them and that is that they're autocratic by nature, right? There's someone who's at the top that actually does say: "This is the direction we're going to go and everybody needs to fall in line." There may be some level of, what do we call it, democracy or getting your ideas together whenever you're trying to figure out what projects to run and where the company wants to go. But once that decision is made, once the "vote" gets taken, then everyone has to jump on board and toe the line. We've got to all follow that direction, otherwise, we don’t have a job.
  9. 9. 9 To listen to this Interview you may download the audio at: Episode 260: http://ec.libsyn.com/p/b/d/6/bd6b10361a13f690/PM_Podcast_260_2014_01_17_- _todd_williams.mp3?d13a76d516d9dec20c3d276ce028ed5089ab1ce3dae902ea1d 06c8803fd7cd5964ea&c_id=6678003 Subscribe to The PM Podcast in iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/project-management-podcast/id79900698#
  10. 10. This Podcast Interview is brought to you by: http://www.project-management- podcast.com/ 10

×