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Virtual Worlds
Instructing Learning in the Metaverse
Principles of virtual worlds
 Learning is promoted through   Experienced through
   Demonstration                Social
  ...
Learned through

A task is a problem that represents a problem that may
be encountered in a real-world situation.
Learning...
Does the learning task

 show the learners real world problems they can solve?
 are learners engaged in the task, beyond j...
Activation

 Does the virtual space allow students to build on what
 they already know.
 Is there a way they can inform th...
Demonstration
Does the simulation exemplify and favour what is
being taught?
How far from ‘reality’ do you need to be, in ...
Application
 How do they use new knowledge to solve a problem?
   Recall, regognise, find, choose, use ...
   Choose Parts,...
Integration

 How can learners
   adapt, modify, transform the ‘world’ to demonstrate
   new knowledge the suit new contex...
Out of world

 From the immersive experience: Is there opportunity
   to publicly demonstrate new knowledge or skill
   re...
Ed Tech Implications
 Task centred activities (not problem solving per se)
 Increasing difficulty is a principle in which s...
Rise and Fall of ‘help’

 As learners complete simple tasks, and as tasks
 become more complex - the instructions are
 acc...
VW Navigation

Learners ‘see’ how contents (components) are
organised, proportionate to their XP, skill and
understanding....
VW Motivation
Environment: Interesting, relevant, achievable,
astonishing, functional. Allow for autonomy as well as
instr...
Imaging worlds for learning	
Re-concepualising the learning plan


  Problems: task to be accomplished
  Progression: Iden...
Creating the world
Re-concepualising the learning plan



  Design: interfaces, interactions (people/objects), scale,
  re...
Games vs Open Worlds
Games have managed objectives. The computer acts
as provide, judge and arbiter in attainment.
Games a...
Why Virtual Worlds over Web

 Virtual Worlds create a sense of shared presence
 Change the expected and disrupt assumption...
Controlled Learning
 Instructionally, the sim is known, strategic and with
 purpose.
 Lacks the distractions of flicking be...
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Virtual Worlds - Instructional Design View

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This is presentation, to go with a newcomer tour of Second Life for Education. The workshop is about instructional design considerations and needs for the effective conceptualisation and use of virtual worlds in higher (or any) education - based on theory and game-theory.

Published in: Education
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Virtual Worlds - Instructional Design View

  1. 1. Virtual Worlds Instructing Learning in the Metaverse
  2. 2. Principles of virtual worlds Learning is promoted through Experienced through Demonstration Social Application Emotional Activation Cognitive Integration Dextrous Task Centred Trust
  3. 3. Learned through A task is a problem that represents a problem that may be encountered in a real-world situation. Learning objectives or samples of the types of problems learners will be able to solve at the end of the learning sequence. Learning Sequence is planned around learning outcomes and tasks are explained.
  4. 4. Does the learning task show the learners real world problems they can solve? are learners engaged in the task, beyond just operation or action/reaction to objects encnountered Involve a progression of problems Allow planned levels of complexity Allow playful discovery to try, retry, correct - adjust.
  5. 5. Activation Does the virtual space allow students to build on what they already know. Is there a way they can inform the instructor of what they already know and skip elements Provide a mental, visual, spacial audible schema from to incorporate new content and ideas. (flow on)
  6. 6. Demonstration Does the simulation exemplify and favour what is being taught? How far from ‘reality’ do you need to be, in order to learn? serious game/simulation vs fantasy discovery Are the example in the ‘world’ consistent with what is being taught ‘out’ world. Are learners guided by relevant representations and instructions for the problem to be solved.
  7. 7. Application How do they use new knowledge to solve a problem? Recall, regognise, find, choose, use ... Choose Parts, Find Kinds, Show how to, What Happens If Guidance is REDUCED when application is needed. Learners are more autonomous and need peers Are there various problems to solve that are related?
  8. 8. Integration How can learners adapt, modify, transform the ‘world’ to demonstrate new knowledge the suit new contexts/situations Work as a group to solve a problem too large for one person to solve (chunk, negotiation, collaborate) Transfer and demonstrate the virtual learning into everyday life situations
  9. 9. Out of world From the immersive experience: Is there opportunity to publicly demonstrate new knowledge or skill reflect-on, discuss and defend new knowledge and skills learning in world. create, invent, explore new ways to use the new knowledge and skill in new contexts/situations.
  10. 10. Ed Tech Implications Task centred activities (not problem solving per se) Increasing difficulty is a principle in which scaffolding of learning tasks is contained There are pre-designed, managed tiers of difficulty Whole task are broken down into part-tasks (may be covert or overt in they way they are encountered) Intented and unexpected outcomes are valid XP.
  11. 11. Rise and Fall of ‘help’ As learners complete simple tasks, and as tasks become more complex - the instructions are accordingly decreased. Learners may need to redo, retrack, repeat earlier experiences and activities (to receive greater help) Help is not ‘whole’ and not ‘wholly available’.
  12. 12. VW Navigation Learners ‘see’ how contents (components) are organised, proportionate to their XP, skill and understanding. Go back and forth, correcting themselves Have sufficient ‘cognitive’ prompts to simulate or infer choice of movement, direction and interaction with other people, environments and objects
  13. 13. VW Motivation Environment: Interesting, relevant, achievable, astonishing, functional. Allow for autonomy as well as instructed learning instances. Collabortion: Favour small groups (5-10) to optimise interactions. Group assignments structured around WHOLE tasks (real products) in and out of the ‘world’ Interaction: solving real world tasks, not navigating Interaction: has context, challenge, activity, feedback.
  14. 14. Imaging worlds for learning Re-concepualising the learning plan Problems: task to be accomplished Progression: Identify small problems within the whole that increase in complexity of skill/XP to solve them Analysis: ID the skills and knowledge students need to complete the progression Strategy: The learning cycle. Where does the world fit into the overall learning cycle. End to end, or a component of
  15. 15. Creating the world Re-concepualising the learning plan Design: interfaces, interactions (people/objects), scale, realism, detail, architecture, shared experiences. Production: Sharing the vision (design ideas, samples, mood boards, extent, testing, modding - ENDING. Maintaining: Open 24/7, Private, Selected Users, Permissions over object creation use, assurance. Evaluation: Formative, summative, peer, observed.
  16. 16. Games vs Open Worlds Games have managed objectives. The computer acts as provide, judge and arbiter in attainment. Games are goal orientated ALWAYS. Educational Games are now Serious Games Open Worlds have new learning archetypes and require instructional designers to work with instructors and course designers - a shared vision Open Worlds have no ‘goal’ unless you create them
  17. 17. Why Virtual Worlds over Web Virtual Worlds create a sense of shared presence Change the expected and disrupt assumptions Are safe fail, not fail safe learning environments Have greater depth of research to support them as instructionally designed learning spaces over ‘emerging’ technologies such as Web2.0 Fun, engaging, new, surprising, immersive learning.
  18. 18. Controlled Learning Instructionally, the sim is known, strategic and with purpose. Lacks the distractions of flicking between ‘work’ and social using browser tabs Is a known, managed sanctuary from distractions of ‘social media’ and familiar digital tools Can be modded, reused and changed to meet the needs of learners.

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