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Null hypothesis for a single-sample t-test

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Null hypothesis for a single-sample t-test

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Null hypothesis for a single-sample t-test

  1. 1. Null-hypothesis for a Single- Sample t-test Conceptual Explanation
  2. 2. With hypothesis testing we are setting up a null- hypothesis
  3. 3. With hypothesis testing we are setting up a null- hypothesis – the probability that there is no effect or relationship –
  4. 4. With hypothesis testing we are setting up a null- hypothesis – the probability that there is no effect or relationship – and then we collect evidence that leads us to either accept or reject that null hypothesis.
  5. 5. With hypothesis testing we are setting up a null- hypothesis – the probability that there is no effect or relationship – and then we collect evidence that leads us to either accept or reject that null hypothesis. As you may recall, a single-sample t-test attempts to determine if the sample you wish to run studies on is representative of the population from which it was drawn.
  6. 6. For example:
  7. 7. Let’s say we want to know if the sample of teenage ACT scores we have collected (sample size = 30) is representative of the larger population of student ACT scores.
  8. 8. Let’s say we want to know if teenagers who eat asparagus (sample size = 30) get better ACT scores than the larger population of students. Here’s the null-hypothesis: There is no significant difference between the mean ACT scores of students in our sample and the mean ACT scores of the general population.

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