AECT 2013 Lessons learned

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  • Teaching and leadership have many similarities- they both take presence- many of the things you mention as lessons learned apply to leadership studies as well. Joe
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  • Background on Stefan Sagmeister: designer, TED Talks, his Things I’ve Learned in My Life So Far project.
    Stefan Sagmeister’s List:
    Helping other people helps me.2. Having guts always works out for me.3. Thinking that life will be better in the future is stupid. I have to live now.4. Organising a charity group is surprisingly easy.5. Being not truthful always works against me.6. Everything I do always comes back to me.7. Assuming is stifling.8. Drugs feel great in the beginning and become a drag later on.9. Over time I get used to everything and start taking for granted.10. Money does not make me happy.11. My dreams have no meaning.12. Keeping a diary supports personal development.13. Trying to look good limits my life.14. Material luxuries are best enjoyed in small doses.15. Worrying solves nothing.16. Complaining is silly. Either act or forget.17. Everybody thinks they are right.18. If I want to explore a new direction professionally, it is helpful to try it out for myself first.19. Low expectations are a good strategy.20. Everybody who is honest is interesting.
    Image source: http://blog.ted.com/2009/07/21/twitter_snapsho_15/
  • http://www.thingsihavelearnedinmylife.com/
    http://www.amazon.com/Things-Have-Learned-Life-Far/dp/0810995298/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1292876013&sr=8-1
  • http://www.thingsihavelearnedinmylife.com/
    http://www.amazon.com/Things-Have-Learned-Life-Far/dp/0810995298/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1292876013&sr=8-1
  • http://www.thingsihavelearnedinmylife.com/
    http://www.amazon.com/Things-Have-Learned-Life-Far/dp/0810995298/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1292876013&sr=8-1
  • We were inspired by Stefan’s work, so decided to come up with our own list of things we’d learned about teaching online.
    There were five of us: Patrick, Joni, Brian, Ellen, and Storm.
  • But over the years, I have found that feedback is perhaps one of the best ways to establish this connection with students.
    So I am thinking of feedback in very general terms here as things like the feedback given on student projects, feedback given to students discussion postings (w/in the threaded discussion), and general feedback given to students about how they are doing in the class.
    There are multiple ways I give students feedback.
  • Break room into 10 small groups. Each small group contributes one, and enters it in Google Docs.
    http://tinyurl.com/3hgswvb
  • AECT 2013 Lessons learned

    1. 1. Lessons from the field: An analysis of online instructors’ lessons learned about teaching online Joni Dunlap University of Colorado Denver Patrick Lowenthal Boise State University
    2. 2. We created a list of “lessons learned” about teaching online courses so far…
    3. 3. Patrick’s #1: Feedback is essential
    4. 4. Joni’s #2: Don't under-estimate the power of fun, play, & the unexpected
    5. 5. Started collecting “lessons” from colleagues at conferences... 9
    6. 6. Data collection • CiTE 2011, Denver, CO • CU Online Symposium 2011, Aurora, CO • Colorado Learning & Teaching with Technology (COLTT) 2011, Boulder, CO • ED-MEDIA 2012, Denver, CO • EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) 2013, Denver, CO 10
    7. 7. Your lessons… Now it’s your turn! What are your lessons learned? Go to http://tinyurl.com/LessonsLearnedELI2013
    8. 8. Google Doc 12
    9. 9. Analysis of “lessons learned” • Shared preliminary themes with conference colleagues, modified based on feedback • Review of results, seven themes emerged: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Preparation Student support Assessment and expectations Structure and presentation Engagement and activity Presence Personal impact 13
    10. 10. #1. Preparation • Be prepared up front to be flexible (expect the unexpected, no matter how prepared you think you are)… • Be well prepared.  Quality comes from advanced thoughtfulness. • Have plans A, B, C... for all modalities • Nothing beats preparation • Technology fails. Have a back-up plan. 14
    11. 11. #1. Preparation • Be prepared up front to be flexible (expect the unexpected, no matter how prepared you think you are)… • Be well prepared.  Quality comes from advanced thoughtfulness. • Have plans A, B, C... for all modalities • Nothing beats preparation • Technology fails. Have a back-up plan. 15
    12. 12. #1. Preparation • Be prepared up front to be flexible (expect the unexpected, no matter how prepared you think you are)… • Be well prepared.  Quality comes from advanced thoughtfulness. • Have plans A, B, C... for all modalities • Nothing beats preparation • Technology fails. Have a back-up plan. 16
    13. 13. #1. Preparation • Be prepared up front to be flexible (expect the unexpected, no matter how prepared you think you are)… • Be well prepared.  Quality comes from advanced thoughtfulness. • Have plans A, B, C... for all modalities • Nothing beats preparation • Technology fails. Have a back-up plan. 17
    14. 14. #1. Preparation • Be prepared up front to be flexible (expect the unexpected, no matter how prepared you think you are)… • Be well prepared.  Quality comes from advanced thoughtfulness. • Have plans A, B, C... for all modalities • Nothing beats preparation • Technology fails. Have a back-up plan. 18
    15. 15. #2. Student Support • Address all learning styles • Champion the student voice • Prompt and frequent feedback is a must • Give students choices • Make sure your students can’t get lost • Account for cultural differences 19
    16. 16. #2. Student Support • Address all learning styles • Champion the student voice • Prompt and frequent feedback is a must • Give students choices • Make sure your students can’t get lost • Account for cultural differences 20
    17. 17. #2. Student Support • Address all learning styles • Champion the student voice • Prompt and frequent feedback is a must • Give students choices • Make sure your students can’t get lost • Account for cultural differences 21
    18. 18. #2. Student Support • Address all learning styles • Champion the student voice • Prompt and frequent feedback is a must • Give students choices • Make sure your students can’t get lost • Account for cultural differences 22
    19. 19. #2. Student Support • Address all learning styles • Champion the student voice • Prompt and frequent feedback is a must • Give students choices • Make sure your students can’t get lost • Account for cultural differences 23
    20. 20. #2. Student Support • Address all learning styles • Champion the student voice • Prompt and frequent feedback is a must • Give students choices • Make sure your students can’t get lost • Account for cultural differences 24
    21. 21. #3. Assessment & Expectations • Have effective rubrics • Grade frequently...if you don’t grade, they don’t do • Model what you want from students • Be more concrete and explicit with instructions 25
    22. 22. #3. Assessment & Expectations • Have effective rubrics • Grade frequently...if you don’t grade, they don’t do • Model what you want from students • Be more concrete and explicit with instructions 26
    23. 23. #3. Assessment & Expectations • Have effective rubrics • Grade frequently...if you don’t grade, they don’t do • Model what you want from students • Be more concrete and explicit with instructions 27
    24. 24. #3. Assessment & Expectations • Have effective rubrics • Grade frequently...if you don’t grade, they don’t do • Model what you want from students • Be more concrete and explicit with instructions 28
    25. 25. #4. Structure & Presentation • Put information in digestible chunks • Use guest lectures where appropriate • Assign meaningful work • Use technology intentionally • Integrate visual components • Be careful about “eye candy” for technology’s sake • Know your technology and make it relevant to course objectives 29
    26. 26. #4. Structure & Presentation • Put information in digestible chunks • Use guest lectures where appropriate • Assign meaningful work • Use technology intentionally • Integrate visual components • Be careful about “eye candy” for technology’s sake • Know your technology and make it relevant to course objectives 30
    27. 27. #4. Structure & Presentation • Put information in digestible chunks • Use guest lectures where appropriate • Assign meaningful work • Use technology intentionally • Integrate visual components • Be careful about “eye candy” for technology’s sake • Know your technology and make it relevant to course objectives 31
    28. 28. #4. Structure & Presentation • Put information in digestible chunks • Use guest lectures where appropriate • Assign meaningful work • Use technology intentionally • Integrate visual components • Be careful about “eye candy” for technology’s sake • Know your technology and make it relevant to course objectives 32
    29. 29. #4. Structure & Presentation • Put information in digestible chunks • Use guest lectures where appropriate • Assign meaningful work • Use technology intentionally • Integrate visual components • Be careful about “eye candy” for technology’s sake • Know your technology and make it relevant to course objectives 33
    30. 30. #4. Structure & Presentation • Put information in digestible chunks • Use guest lectures where appropriate • Assign meaningful work • Use technology intentionally • Integrate visual components • Be careful about “eye candy” for technology’s sake • Know your technology and make it relevant to course objectives 34
    31. 31. #4. Structure & Presentation • Put information in digestible chunks • Use guest lectures where appropriate • Assign meaningful work • Use technology intentionally • Integrate visual components • Be careful about “eye candy” for technology’s sake • Know your technology and make it relevant to course objectives 35
    32. 32. #5. Engagement and activity • You can never do too much to get students to engage • Create opportunities for students to create community and solve their own problems • Give students the opportunity to construct the learning • Make a connection between student career needs and assignments 36
    33. 33. #5. Engagement and activity • You can never do too much to get students to engage • Create opportunities for students to create community and solve their own problems • Give students the opportunity to construct the learning • Make a connection between student career needs and assignments 37
    34. 34. #5. Engagement and activity • You can never do too much to get students to engage • Create opportunities for students to create community and solve their own problems • Give students the opportunity to construct the learning • Make a connection between student career needs and assignments 38
    35. 35. #5. Engagement and activity • You can never do too much to get students to engage • Create opportunities for students to create community and solve their own problems • Give students the opportunity to construct the learning • Make a connection between student career needs and assignments 39
    36. 36. #6. Social Presence • Know your audience • Be accessible • Be kind • Have a sense of humor • Use synchronous technologies • Show your character...personality is a good thing • Being present matters • Create a sense of community • Put faces with names 40
    37. 37. #6. Social Presence • Know your audience • Be accessible • Be kind • Have a sense of humor • Use synchronous technologies • Show your character...personality is a good thing • Being present matters • Create a sense of community • Put faces with names 41
    38. 38. #6. Social Presence • Know your audience • Be accessible • Be kind • Have a sense of humor • Use synchronous technologies • Show your character...personality is a good thing • Being present matters • Create a sense of community • Put faces with names 42
    39. 39. #6. Social Presence • Know your audience • Be accessible • Be kind • Have a sense of humor • Use synchronous technologies • Show your character...personality is a good thing • Being present matters • Create a sense of community • Put faces with names 43
    40. 40. #6. Social Presence • Know your audience • Be accessible • Be kind • Have a sense of humor • Use synchronous technologies • Show your character...personality is a good thing • Being present matters • Create a sense of community • Put faces with names 44
    41. 41. #6. Social Presence • Know your audience • Be accessible • Be kind • Have a sense of humor • Use synchronous technologies • Show your character...personality is a good thing • Being present matters • Create a sense of community • Put faces with names 45
    42. 42. #6. Social Presence • Know your audience • Be accessible • Be kind • Have a sense of humor • Use synchronous technologies • Show your character...personality is a good thing • Being present matters • Create a sense of community • Put faces with names 46
    43. 43. #6. Social Presence • Know your audience • Be accessible • Be kind • Have a sense of humor • Use synchronous technologies • Show your character...personality is a good thing • Being present matters • Create a sense of community • Put faces with names 47
    44. 44. #6. Social Presence • Know your audience • Be accessible • Be kind • Have a sense of humor • Use synchronous technologies • Show your character...personality is a good thing • Being present matters • Create a sense of community • Put faces with names 48
    45. 45. #7a. Personal Impact, on teaching • The world is your audience • I’ve learned how to use an iPad • Online teaching isn’t about taking your faceto-face course materials & uploading them to a course! • It’s important to teaching faculty how to teach online • Use tools like the Quality Matters rubric when designing • Mini-lectures are better lectures! 49
    46. 46. #7a. Personal Impact, on teaching • The world is your audience • I’ve learned how to use an iPad • Online teaching isn’t about taking your faceto-face course materials & uploading them to a course! • It’s important to teaching faculty how to teach online • Use tools like the Quality Matters rubric when designing • Mini-lectures are better lectures! 50
    47. 47. #7a. Personal Impact, on teaching • The world is your audience • I’ve learned how to use an iPad • Online teaching isn’t about taking your faceto-face course materials & uploading them to a course! • It’s important to teaching faculty how to teach online • Use tools like the Quality Matters rubric when designing • Mini-lectures are better lectures! 51
    48. 48. #7a. Personal Impact, on teaching • The world is your audience • I’ve learned how to use an iPad • Online teaching isn’t about taking your faceto-face course materials & uploading them to a course! • It’s important to teaching faculty how to teach online • Use tools like the Quality Matters rubric when designing • Mini-lectures are better lectures! 52
    49. 49. #7a. Personal Impact, on teaching • The world is your audience • I’ve learned how to use an iPad • Online teaching isn’t about taking your faceto-face course materials & uploading them to a course! • It’s important to teaching faculty how to teach online • Use tools like the Quality Matters rubric when designing • Mini-lectures are better lectures! 53
    50. 50. #7a. Personal Impact, on teaching • The world is your audience • I’ve learned how to use an iPad • Online teaching isn’t about taking your faceto-face course materials & uploading them to a course! • It’s important to teaching faculty how to teach online • Use tools like the Quality Matters rubric when designing • Mini-lectures are better lectures! 54
    51. 51. #7b. Personal Impact, on time • Teaching online can be done anytime/anywhere, but it sure stinks to be teaching while on vacation • Don’t underestimate the time commitment to teach online 55
    52. 52. #7b. Personal Impact, on time • Teaching online can be done anytime/anywhere, but it sure stinks to be teaching while on vacation • Don’t underestimate the time commitment to teach online 56
    53. 53. “Lessons learned” = recommendations • What are your thoughts about the seven themes? • What are your “lessons learned”? • What would you add, is there a missing theme? ? 57
    54. 54. Joni Dunlap | joni.dunlap@ucdenver.edu Patrick Lowenthal | patricklowenthal@boisestate.edu Contact Us

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