Future of the Contact Centre

586 views

Published on

Presentation by Plantronics and Leesman, reviewing how the contact centre environment can significantly enhance customer service

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
586
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • How many of you use the phrase, or have heard the phrase “your call may be recorded for quality purposes”? Probably everyone.What if we turn this around – looking forward, the customer will soon tell us “I’m taking notes about what you do on this call and will use it for the purposes of shaming you on social media to improve quality”I wanted to find a statistic that would sum up this change to customer service
  • 100% of customer service interactions will be in the public domain. Our customers are monitoring our calls for quality purposes, and making the outcomes public. This is bringing into sharp focus the way that we run our customer service departments. Nobody wants to be the next Dellhell, or United (breaking guitars). You will need smarter customer service – this isn’t just being witty on Twitter, this is organisation wide change
  • We hear more about hyper-specialists and networked experts, I want to add marketing experts or brand ambassadorsto that list. Contact centres have just as much influence on brand as marketing departments do – and this will increase going forward An example of the second point, is that I searched for a leading service oriented company on googleThe first entry was an advert saying ‘people are our best asset’ or similarSecond entry (unpaid for) was a social media forum post indicating that the company were “horrible to work for”You are not going to get the best people with this approach. And if you aren’t getting them in at the floor, you are missing out on talent that can move through and enhance your organisation. Contact centres are the incubator of talent for organisations, and 90% of CCs say that providing career path opportunities is good/excellent for improving retention – so how do we find and keep those people in our organisations?
  • Well, lets start by giving them the right environment to work in. The right people who are capable of delivering smarter customer service, need a smarter environment to work in.2012 attrition rate for contact centres is 20%, and at £1921 to recruit a replacement, there is a real business cost to this continued drain of people. Not counting the impact of lower service quality because we aren’t retaining knowledge
  • We wanted to look at the impact of environment on customer service performance. We chose a home working case study to show a clean transition to new, non traditional CC environment, and to show the impact of this new environment. Home working in UK contact centres hasn't been around long enough to really study the impacts on customer service, hence aUS case study is usedSnapshots from other trials to show impacts are wider than efficiency:10% increase in customer satisfaction across many measures, a markedly improved employee retentionWe can see that a new, smarter environment makes a difference to service level, so how do you find out what makes a good environment? This is where Leesman comes in, as the only independent organisation that measures and benchmarks the performance of physical working environments, they provide a direct insight into how well your employees feel supported in what they do.
  • We measure how well office environments support employees in their work - nothing else. Our workplace satisfaction survey is used by corporate organisations and their consultants worldwide, to measureand benchmark the performance of their physical working environments. Together we are changing the way workplace is measured.
  • The Leesman Index is the workplace industry’s unified and independent workplace effectiveness measurement tool. It is designed for all involved in the brief development, design, delivery and management of commercial workplace environments and provides an inexpensive, systematic approach to the collection, analysis and benchmarking of “workplace satisfaction” data
  • This is how the Leesman Index is represented pictorially, low on the left (red) improving up to high on the right (green). The current lowest performing workplace measured at 39.8, and the highest at 84
  • We can see here, two contact centre organisations with a low LMi score – and a correspondingly low score from the employees regarding support for their productivity
  • Now overlaid with two highly scoring organisations – note the big increase in productivity scores from the organisations with higher LMi scores
  • This illustrates the change that client C achieved – the score on the left is for their old collection of 3 buildings, built up over time as the company expanded. They then went through a process of using Leesman to evaluate their current environment, and understand what was needed for the new environment. Placing the entire process in the hands of the employees to indicate what was need in the new building to support productive activity
  • This is the profile of how important employees in client A rated their activities. No surprises that individual focused work and telephone conversations are the highest rated
  • Now compare to how well those activities are supported by the environment
  • The Leesman survey is like looking at the DNA of an organisation. You may think that two call centres will always be the same in their needs and requirements, but this is not the case. The type of work undertaken, the people employed, the vertical sector – all these influence a different set of needs and requirements
  • There is no cookie cutter approach
  • Here’s a profile of workplace needs – the red line indicates the importance people are placing on an item in their workplace, the green line indicates their satisfaction with it. As the client has 3 sites, the blue line is the average across all sites. The grey bar is the 2/3rds level. As can be seen, only the chair achieves a high satisfaction level.
  • Here’s the profile for an organisation where almost all aspects of the environment are classed as satisfactory
  • Now comparing the LMi score with the % of employees who believe their environment has a positive impact on their corporate image. We can see that the environment in clients A & B does not support the corporate image well. If you are trying to change the culture within an organisation, to one where customer service is vital, these organisations will have significant difficulty achieving this, and struggle to get buy-in and support from employees.
  • Contrast this with the score achieved by organisations with a high LMi – these organisations will be (or have been) successful in implementing cultural change as their employees are in an environment that supports the corporate image.
  • So in an world where contact centre employees have significant and increasing impact on your organisations brand, which environment would you want them sat in? One which supports a corporate image of high customer service, or one where they feel has low impact on the corporate image
  • We went through the process of analysing our workplace, using the Leesman Survey to define our new building. The end result is an award for our office from the British Institute of Facilities Management for Impact on Organisation and Workplace.In addition, our contact centre has been shortlisted in the category ‘great places to work’ by the CCASummary – the future of work will be different to what we experience now, customer service will change – driven by social media, you need the right environment to attract and keep the right people to deliver this next generation of customer service
  • Thankyou for listening!
  • Future of the Contact Centre

    1. 1. 11/9/2012
    2. 2. 100% of customer serviceinteractions will be in the public domain
    3. 3. Its all about the people ‘Agents’, ‘call handlers’ or brand ambassadors?Marketing take a back seat – Contact Centre is now responsible for the brand Contact centre is the incubator of talent for organisations 90% of CCs say that career path opportunities are good/excellent for improving retention* *Contact Babel, 2012
    4. 4. Finders, keepers Building and environment promotes and reinforces culture The right people need the right environment 0.8m2 desk space?20% employee attrition?
    5. 5. Work from home case study* Global airline, 2 year study, 50% of US workforce 10% increase in calls per hour 12% increase in revenue per hour Reduced CC budget by 15-20% *At Home Customer Contacts
    6. 6. A unified global standardfor the measurement ofworkplace effectiveness
    7. 7. 13,000 respondents in 2 yrs, 18,000+ by end 2012
    8. 8. Measure what people are doing…. and the things they need to doit. important workplace activities physical facilities and features services ability of the brand and workplace to the role of culture support design business activities
    9. 9. The Leesman Lmi benchmark • each anonymous response assigned Lmi 39.8 84.0Lmi 0 0 100 Low performing workspace High performing workspace
    10. 10. If you don’t measure it... you can’t manage it.% agreement (agree slightly, agree, agree strongly) that the design of the workplace enables them to work productively
    11. 11. How much do you agree or disagree with the following statements aboutthe design of your organisations office? It enables me to workproductively. 100 90 80Lmi 70 60 50 40 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 % who agree with statement re working productively
    12. 12. How much do you agree or disagree with the following statements aboutthe design of your organisations office? It enables me to workproductively. 100 90 80Lmi 70 60 50 40 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 % who agree with statement re working productively
    13. 13. 6 contact centres, 737 respondents Client A Client B Lmi 62.2 Lmi 69.6 53% working 65% working productivity productivity
    14. 14. 6 contact centres, 737 respondents Client A Client B Client C Client D Lmi 62.2 Lmi 69.6 Lmi 83.9 Lmi 84.0 53% working 65% working 84% working 95% working productivity productivity productivity productivity
    15. 15. 6 contact centres, 737 respondents Client C Client C Lmi 65.2 Lmi 83.9 64% working 84% working productivity productivity
    16. 16. Client A. Lmi 62.2 - Profile of workplace activities by importance Individual focused work desk based 1 [1] Telephone conversations 2 [2] Relaxing / taking a break 3 [8] Planned meetings 4 [3] Informal un-planned meetings 5 [4] Learning from others 6 [14] Private conversations 7 [21] Individual routine tasks 8 [9] Informal social interaction 9 [11] Reading 10 [7] Thinking / creative thinking 11 [10] Business confidential discussions 12 [5] Collaborating on focused work 13 [6] Spreading out paper or materials 14 [12] Larger group meetings or audiences 15 [16] Audio conferences 16 [15] Individual focused work away from your desk 17 [18] Hosting visitors clients or customers 18 [13] Collaborating on creative work 19 [17]Using technical / specialist equipment or materials 20 [20] Video conferences 21 [19] 0 95 189 284 378 473
    17. 17. Client A. Lmi 62.2 - Profile of workplace activities by satisfaction Individual routine tasks Individual focused work desk based Planned meetings Telephone conversations Learning from others Informal social interaction Collaborating on focused work Relaxing / taking a break Reading Audio conferences Larger group meetings or audiences Collaborating on creative work Hosting visitors clients or customers Informal un-planned meetings Individual focused work away from your desk Video conferences Business confidential discussions Thinking / creative thinking Private conversationsUsing technical / specialist equipment or materials Spreading out paper or materials 0 95 189 284 378 473
    18. 18. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Chair Desk Computing equipment Temperature control Personal storage Telephone equipment Printing / copying / scanning equipment Noise levels Natural light Air quality Office lighting General decor In-office network connectivity Ability to personalise my workstation Meeting rooms (small) People walking past your desk Meeting rooms (large) Informal work areas / break-out zones Space between work-settings Dividers (between desks / areas) Greenery Client A. Lmi 62.2 - Profile of workplace needs Remote access to work files or networkQuiet rooms for working alone or in pairs Desk / room booking systems Shared storage Art or photography Accessibility of colleagues Audio-Visual equipment Variety of different types of workspace Archive storage Guest / visitor network access
    19. 19. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Computing equipment Chair Desk Temperature control Natural light In-office network connectivity Noise levels Telephone equipment Meeting rooms (small) Printing / copying / scanning equipment Remote access to work files or network Office lighting Meeting rooms (large) Personal storage General decor Accessibility of colleaguesQuiet rooms for working alone or in pairs Air quality Informal work areas / break-out zones Greenery Desk / room booking systems Client C. Lmi 83.9 – Profile of workplace needs Audio-Visual equipment Shared storage People walking past your desk Variety of different types of workspace Space between work-settings Dividers (between desks / areas) Art or photography Ability to personalise my workstation Guest / visitor network access Archive storage
    20. 20. 6 contact centres, 737 respondents% who believe that the design of their workplace has a positive impact on their organization’s corporate image Client A Client B Lmi 62.2 Lmi 69.6 58% has 57% has positive impact positive impact
    21. 21. 6 contact centres, 737 respondents% who believe that the design of their workplace has a positive impact on their organization’s corporate image Client A Client B Client C Client D Lmi 62.2 Lmi 69.6 Lmi 83.9 Lmi 84.0 58% has 57% has 96% has 97% has positive impact positive impact positive impact positive impact
    22. 22. Lets put the microscope on Plantronics
    23. 23. www.slideshare.net/richardkenny@contactcenteredwww.leesman.co.uk@leesman_index

    ×