Plan B Studio: Silicon Beach 2013

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Plan B Studio: Silicon Beach 2013

  1. 1. made with love and support @planbstudio #LoveandSupport
  2. 2. This is the internet
  3. 3. v Make things people want v Make people want things
  4. 4. MAKING PEOPLE WANT THINGS (TECHNOLOGY I CAN’T UNDERSTAND) Some examples of technology I can’t understand
  5. 5. Bluetooth. The modern day 56k Modem.
  6. 6. 3D. Utter shite. I didn’t get it when I was 8. Still don’t. 3D is like strip clubs. Now, I’m not a fan of them for lots of reasons but damn sure if a woman is taking her clothes off in front of me I like to be involved. If not then I’m not interested. 3D has the same effect for me. It adds nothing to my cinematic viewing, so don’t both. Instead concentrate your efforts on perhaps the STORY, the DIRECTING, the TALENT?
  7. 7. Nokia 808. It’s USP? A 42MEGA PIXEL camera. I don’t need a camera to have 42MB per shot! Shit pictures on the site (no replaced). Interestingly this graph perhaps shows the biggest reason why Nokia failed.
  8. 8. Nokia 808. It’s USP? A 42MEGA PIXEL camera. I don’t need a camera to have 42MB per shot! Shit pictures on the site (no replaced). Interestingly this graph perhaps shows the biggest reason why Nokia failed.
  9. 9. Left: The new Sony QX100 - kind of makes more sense to me. A Phone Camera or Camera Phone? With a digital zoom lens. These zoom lenses are trite.
  10. 10. Yahoo, daily logo. Fail. Notice the small logo bottom right of the video. Video showing new logo, using their old logo.
  11. 11. ‘The Pebble makes it easy to see whose trying to reach you. You can ‘feel’ incoming calls when your hands are full or glance at text messages when your phone is away. It controls the music on your smartphone...’ What? So your hands are full but you will be able to twist your wrist to see and do what, exactly? Glance at text messages - How busy are you?! What design problem is this solving? Away - on holiday? Feels more like the Pebble is filling a design problem that was never there in the first place.
  12. 12. ‘I got a message from a friend asking was I was up to and I just took a picture and sent it and thought ‘Wow, images are the future’ - Sergey Brin ‘Who would want to hang out with someone wearing these specs? Never knowing when it’s actually safe to pick your nose! Will stalking become normal?’ Panja Göbel, Cant#2 Wearable technology. Google Glass. It’s obvious that until such time that technology can be hardwired in to our central nervous system, brands are going to develop technology that is worn. Wearable technology. This is nothing new. - Nike Fuel band, Jawbone’s Up, Pebble and Google Glass. But I’m not convinced this is stepping stones.
  13. 13. Steve Jobs Schools: ‘teachers will no longer simply convey knowledge to a group of children; they will be transformed into coaches that support children with their individual and group projects. Because educational apps are used for basic skills, the learning process can be completely adapted to the individual child’s learning speed and style.’ ‘...if a teacher hits her "eyes on teacher" button, any or every student's tablet in her classroom suspends; a message tells the student to look up. Or the teacher can call on a student randomly, and a message pops up on her screen. Or with just one click, a teacher can pose a multiple-choice pop quiz and see instant results, set a five-minute timer for an activity, or divide students into discussion groups. Or she can automatically give individualized homework assignments based on the day's performance.’ More than 8 million iPads have been sold to classrooms, including 3.5 million in the last year NewsCorp is not alone. Apple, Amazon, Samsung, Dell, Microsoft are seeking a way in to $9billion dollar market. Where’s Google at with this?
  14. 14. Joel I. Klein (Dungeon Master) is CEO of Amplify, News Corporation’s fledgling education division. $9 billion market for educational technology to replace text books. NewsCorp not alone - Apple, Amazon, Samsung, Dell, Microsoft all in there. Where’s Google?
  15. 15. Joel I. Klein (Dungeon Master) is CEO of Amplify, News Corporation’s fledgling education division. $9 billion market for educational technology to replace text books. NewsCorp not alone - Apple, Amazon, Samsung, Dell, Microsoft all in there. Where’s Google?
  16. 16. Joel I. Klein (Dungeon Master) is CEO of Amplify, News Corporation’s fledgling education division. $9 billion market for educational technology to replace text books. NewsCorp not alone - Apple, Amazon, Samsung, Dell, Microsoft all in there. Where’s Google?
  17. 17. Right now the internet uses the RSA algorithm (RSA stands for Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir and Leonard Adleman, who first publicly described the algorithm in 1977). A user of RSA creates and then publishes the product of two large prime numbers, along with an auxiliary value, as their public key. The prime factors must be kept secret. Anyone can use the public key to encrypt a message, but with currently published methods, if the public key is large enough, only someone with knowledge of the prime factors can feasibly decode the message. Why does this matter? Using a quantum-bit (qubit) computing experiment Erik has created the possibility of breaking the RSA algorithm; the main encryption the internet uses. He's done this by creating the first quantum-bit (qubit) computer. What does this mean? You buy something using your credit card. Between you and your bank there is an encryption key. That key is made from two large prime numbers, both kept secret. You have one, your bank has one and the encryption key is the multiplication of those two numbers which would normally take millions of computers longer than the age of the universe to crack. Until Erik. Using Quantum physics the calculations are not done sequentially, but simultaneously. What does this mean? It means, in theory, the encryption key created by your transaction, between you and your bank could be broken as fast they are made. BUT Worry not. The same Quantum computing means that using quantum laws physics can also be used to create the ultimate way to safeguard. Current codes are called Public Key Codes and they could be broken by Quantum computing. But Quantum mechanics supplies methods that means sharing information securing using Quantum cryptography.
  18. 18. steve dot i dot am ‘First-off your logo has to be just as impactful in black and white you’ve got to start there. If your logo’s not powerful black and white then there’s a problem. If your logo’s not powerful very, very small then there’s a problem. If your logo collapses when you blow it up really, really big, then there’s a problem. If your logo can’t transform itself to other things and you still don’t know what that thing is then there’s a problem. So your logo should be able to have all those things in the new world where, you know … it’s symbolic… some type of meaning that represents your brands, companies… I don’t even like to use the word brand, your companies… if the logo doesn’t represent the companies objective… on a symbolic level… right, ‘cuz you have to think of what India is going to do to the world. We know what Silicon Valley did to the world. We know what China does for the world. But what India is gonna do for the world is it’s gonna create this symbolic language, because India’s unique because they speak English but they have a different alphabet. So they’re gonna add a whole new visual connecting language to the planet. You know? And Symbology and logos are going to play a big role in that. Understanding something just by looking at a logo, or different symbols. A new language. A new type of font will emerge. And understanding of symbols.’ – Will.i.am, Creative Director Intel. Self-promoted ‘Pop Innovator’
  19. 19. The Will.i.am i.am+fotososho™ $320 Pop innovator. This is what one does. Take an amazing piece of technology innovation, put it in a $320 case to make it look and work like an old camera. Don’t ask what happens when someone calls you.
  20. 20. MAKING THINGS PEOPLE WANT NEED (TECHNOLOGY I CAN UNDERSTAND) Some examples of technology I can understand
  21. 21. Sources: http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/03/series-seed/ http://www.seriesseed.com/ GitHub CEO Tom Preston-Werner What started out as the go-to social networking site for programmers is quickly becoming an open source platform for all - including lawyers. Series Seed - is one of Silicon Valley’s star legal firms, Fenwick & West, who have posted a set of legal documents to GitHub that startups can use when lining up their first stage of venture funding.
  22. 22. Sources: http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/03/series-seed/ http://www.seriesseed.com/ GitHub CEO Tom Preston-Werner What started out as the go-to social networking site for programmers is quickly becoming an open source platform for all - including lawyers. Series Seed - is one of Silicon Valley’s star legal firms, Fenwick & West, who have posted a set of legal documents to GitHub that startups can use when lining up their first stage of venture funding.
  23. 23. Old tech (SMS) meets new tech with Buddy is a digital tool to support therapy services. Clients use text messaging to keep a daily diary of what they are doing and how they are feeling, helping to spot and reinforce positive behaviors. SMS based technology filters in to a comprehensive database to help develop their mental health. Technology is not always about leaping forward.
  24. 24. Recently read What if Apple’s iWatch is… a TV? By Jonny Haskins In December 2012, Tim Cook said in an NBC interview, “When I go into my living room and turn on the TV, I feel like I have gone backwards in time by 20 to 30 years…It’s an area of intense interest.  I can’t say more than that.” TV which taps into a $39 billion market.  A watch couldn’t command even 1% of that market’s earnings. The principal profit comes not from selling the TV, but the right to access specific content and to buy the unique platform that brings this to you.
  25. 25. Give people what they want, when they want it, in the form they want it in, at a reasonable price and they’ll more likely pay for it than steal it. - Kevin Spacey Kevin Spacey on the Netflix/House of Cards success and learning from the music industries mistakes. If iWatch is a TV is spells another revolution even bigger than the mobile revolution that Apple changed in 2007. Just six years ago, and look at the changes.
  26. 26. http://corrupt.ch/fartbutton/ Fart Like button. Sometimes it is the simple things.
  27. 27. CPR Who can perform CPR?
  28. 28. http://thelifesaverproject.com/ Idea by Martin Percy and Piero Frescobaldi (unit9) Going in to all High schools in the UK and hopefully the USA. Imagine! Average stay on the website over 9 minutes Site of The Month by FWA in August.  1 out of 8 users spends 25 minutes on the website. 1 out of 8 users completes the 3 modules.     Total website user from April the 1st to August 21st : 106,969 Average monthly user: 21.000 it was an idea of Martin Percy who realised that a first aid course could not prepare you for real life scenario and would not help the bystander syndrome.   The only way to really give people confidence is to put them in an emotional situation (this is what film does) and reward them for the success (this is what games do well). So he thought of mixing the 2.  he wrote the scripts and then broguth them to me. I loved the idea and we went out to find the support of government and institutions.  After a long period of one year Pietro and Martin found the Technology Strategy Board and the Resuscitation council that backed the project.
  29. 29. But where do the ideas come from Steve?
  30. 30. Simpson’s Smithers getting twerked by strippers Young toddler filmed to look like she’s drinking booze. (she wasn’t) (we hope) Japanese guy walks in to post, the sets about beating said post up. Two young kids doing karate, badly. Flashing animation of a person dancing wildly. girl swigging from bottle of JD’s Another girl drinking pretty darn hard. Gifs. Gifs broke my Keynote, so here are the descriptions of the amazing gifs. Difficult isn’t it sometimes? The Internet. A crazy, kamikaze place. Social Media is like the pub. Some go to have quiet pint and read their paper, others for a night out, others to ‘pull’, some to dance, and some to fuck and fight - rarely at the same time.
  31. 31. Sources: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/27514afc-5444-11e2-9d25-00144feab49a.html?siteedition=uk#axzz2doOu31dt http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/technology/jackrivlin/100009761/tinder-the-casual-sex-app-that-makes-us-even-more-vain/ Image: Michael Nagle for The New York Times Studies show that Facebook likes and retweets on Twitter give users a dopamine rush, making them feel happier. Imagine the hit from someone saying that they fancy you. That hit, along with the sheer volume of people to look at, makes swiping fiendishly addictive. ‘Kristen Lindquist, professor of psychology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, says social information feels intrinsically rewarding to people. We get a jolt of dopamine when someone “likes” our Facebook post or retweets our Twitter link. Over time, the effect on the reward centre in the brain is similar to what makes drug addicts go back for another line of cocaine. “You end up developing an association between Facebook and goodness, and that sustains the behaviour,” Ms Lindquist says. “As with cocaine addicts, over time you need more and more of that substance to get that feeling.” One study of Chinese students who spent 10 hours a day, six days a week playing online games, found decreases in grey matter in parts of the brain associated with cognitive function. Researchers concluded that “long-term internet addiction would result in brain structural alterations”, contributing to chronic dysfunction.
  32. 32. Let’s take a coffee break. Wait. Not this coffee.
  33. 33. There we go! Proper Coffee. Proper Pricey! Coffee shops are booming all over. They act as hubs for the lone wifi laptoper, the office catch-up, the brain storm, the interview, the client meeting. It’s a place where collaborations are born. Where ideas are spawned. But this is nothing new...
  34. 34. Sources: http://www.ted.com/talks/steven_johnson_where_good_ideas_come_from.html First coffee shop opened in Oxford around 1650, two years or so later the first opened on Cornhill in London. Suddenly business went from noisy, drunken taverns to coffee houses. Business and commerce took-off. By no coincidence that Coffee shops have once again boomed in the last 15-20years along with global economies, fueled by capitalism they once again act as a meeting point for minds and collaborations. But it is the meeting of minds, or the space for one mind to develop new ideas.
  35. 35. Sources: http://www.ted.com/talks/steven_johnson_where_good_ideas_come_from.html Neurons. The human brain has billions of them. Each helping us to make decisions, control movement and create new ideas. So scientifically speaking an idea is a tiny neutron, one of billions. How amazing is that. Graham Wood recently wrote: ‘John Gribbin has noticed that humans are made of stars. It could be good for us to behave like it a bit more.’
  36. 36. Kincsem, Ch.m. 1874, undefeated winner in 54 starts in five countries Wouldn’t expect the Colt/Foal to run and win the Grand National, would you? Ideas are the same. They need time to nurture - that’s your choice to manage it or not.
  37. 37. PRODUCT Top down MAKE PEOPLE WANT THINGS DEMAND USERS ADVERTISING A typical top down effect approach, e.g. Samsung/Nokia/Microsoft
  38. 38. USERS PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT USERS USERS USERS USERS USERS PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT Bottom up MAKE THINGS PEOPLE WANT NEED A typical bottom up approach. Making platforms/products (open source) This is the model for platforms like GitHub, Google OpenSource (Android), WikiPedia. BUT the greatest example of OpenSource? Not Google.
  39. 39. SIR TIM BERNERS-LEE. a.k.a. TimBL a British computer scientist and the inventor of the World Wide Web. He made a proposal for an information management system in March 1989,[3] and he implemented the first successful communication between a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) client and server via the Internet sometime around mid November. In 1994, Berners-Lee founded the W3C at MIT. It comprised various companies that were willing to create standards and recommendations to improve the quality of the Web. Berners-Lee made his idea available freely, with no patent and no royalties due. The World Wide Web Consortium decided that its standards should be based on royalty-free technology, so that they could easily be adopted by anyone.
  40. 40. COLLABORATORS PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT USERS USERS USERS USERS USERS PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT IDEA Bottom up MAKE THINGS PEOPLE WANT NEED SAME Bottom-up (Open Source) MODEL CAN BE APPLIED TO IDEAS. It’s about collaborations, sharing ideas and opening up existing and new networks.
  41. 41. Sources: http://www.ted.com/talks/steven_johnson_where_good_ideas_come_from.html Using existing and creating new networks. Look familiar?
  42. 42. IF YOU NEVER DID, YOU SHOULD. THESE THINGS ARE FUN AND FUN IS GOOD. By Dr Suess IF YOU NEVER DID, YOU SHOULD. THESE THINGS ARE FUN AND FUN IS GOOD. By Dr Suess
  43. 43. Can’t Understand New Technology
  44. 44. Can’t Understand New Technology Jargon friendly audiences means I can shorten it to an acronym. No idea why some people see a swear word. I just see Can’t Understand New Technology. Launched and delivered on Feb 14th - because who doesn’t love a Can’t Understand New Technology on their doormat on Valentines day?
  45. 45. Can’t Understand New Technology In our lofty aspiration it’s Private Eye meets PopBitch.
  46. 46. Can’t Understand New Technology Created for and by the creative & tech industry
  47. 47. Can’t Understand New Technology The world is complicated, hectic and ‘mental busy’. Technology means that we no longer get much or anything of interest in the post. Per day (USA 2012) - 132 Billion emails - 6 Billion SMS messages - 239 Million social media messages - 63 Million letters posted
  48. 48. X X X X X X X X X X X Can’t Understand New Technology It’s not online or on any social media feeds, apart from a hashtag #CantUnderstandNewTechnology
  49. 49. Can’t Understand New Technology It’s all of these things, and more.
  50. 50. Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better, it’s not. - Dr Suess Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better, it’s not. - Dr Suess
  51. 51. Thanks, again.
  52. 52. No, thank-you. WRITE: No, THANK-YOU

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