creole as a language(영어발달사)

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creole as a language(영어발달사)

  1. 1. Creole as a language<br />Gyeoung-min Bag<br />Hye-sung Kim<br />
  2. 2. Table of contents<br />The definition of Pidgin & Creole<br />The developmental stage of Creole<br />Video to watch through youtube<br />Linguistic features of Creole <br /> (Jamaican Creole)<br />Conclusion<br />References<br />
  3. 3. Definition of Pidgin & Creole<br />
  4. 4. The developmental phenomena from Jargon to standard language<br />
  5. 5. Three types of developments<br />1.Abrupt Language: early nativization<br />eg) Hawaiian pidgin English<br />2. stabilized pidgin-> Creole<br />eg) North Australian Creole<br />3. Gradual change -> Creole<br />eg) New Guinea TokPisin<br />
  6. 6. Jamaican creole<br />
  7. 7. Jamaican creole<br />www.youatube.com/watch?v=6j6xlGmg95a (0:25~1:05)<br />Smaddy – somebody someone<br /> - phonological feature<br />Chakkachakka– untidy <br /> - morphological feature <br />Dutty up – to make dirty / Galang – go on<br /> - morphological feature<br />
  8. 8. Creole is a “Language”<br />Creativity<br /> - possible to product new utterances<br />e.g.) I man don’t play hockey,<br /> I eat hockey(ackee)!<br />
  9. 9. Creole is a “Language”<br /><ul><li>Syntactic features</li></ul>- Each of morphemes and phonemes has a identity and that of place in sentences. <br />
  10. 10. Creole is a “Language”<br />Morphological features<br />e.g.) likl – likla – liklis(comparative / superlative)<br />e.g.) dembwoy-ya / dat mango-de (demonstrates)<br />e.g.) huoli-huoli(Full Reduplications)<br />e.g.) sidong / pudong / dwiit/ wentaim(alternatives)<br />
  11. 11. Distinctions between Jam and Eng<br />e.g.) singularplural<br />1 person mi wi<br />2 person yuunu<br />3 personim(s/he) dem<br />i(it)<br />
  12. 12. Distinctions between Jam and Eng<br />Gender differentiation / declension<br />e.g.) im can be translated he/him/she/her<br />wi can be translated us<br />dem can be translated they/them<br />e.g.) mi buk / yubuk / dembuk<br />
  13. 13. Distinctions between Jam and Eng<br />Plural Marking / Negation<br />e.g.) unman-dem / dawta-dem<br />e.g.) Wi no kayta / Mi naa(no+a) go <br />Mi nebanuodat / Nobody nevaansadat<br />
  14. 14. Distinctions between Jam and Eng<br />Tense Structure<br />e.g.) <br />Mi lefI leave(habitually) ; left<br />Mi a lefI am leaving<br /> Mi ena(en+a) lefI was leaving<br /> Mi en lefI have left ; I had left<br />
  15. 15. Conclusion<br />Jamaican creole is a language based on the “design features” classification of language<br />Jamaican creole can also be considered a “full” language because it has undergone structure formalization, to phonology, morphology and syntax<br />There are marked distinctions between standard British English and Jamaican creole<br />
  16. 16. References<br />피진과크리올의 분화, 2004, 이원진<br />크리올의 특성비교: 언어학적 관점에서, 2004, 박찬후<br />영어전쟁 그 후, 2010, 서영교<br />The Emergence of Pidgin and Creole Languages, 2008, SIEGEL, Jeff<br />Syntactic features<br />

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