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Thinking Maps

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Thinking Maps

  1. 1. Getting More out of Graphic Organizers Pam Glover, 2009
  2. 2. Analogy ( the bridge map) as Travel brochure travel appetizer the entree as this presentation Pathway to Proficiency for ELLs (Thinking Maps) Relating factor: ..whets the appetite for
  3. 3. Agenda <ul><li>Recapitulate </li></ul><ul><li>Which organizers? </li></ul><ul><li>How does Marzano fit in? </li></ul><ul><li>Thinking Maps – narrow the field, increase the yield </li></ul><ul><li>Build more in </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiate </li></ul><ul><li>Support students’ thinking AND language development </li></ul>
  4. 4. recapitulation re=again capitulare=go over the chapter, main parts tion= suffix forming a noun (The brace map, used to show parts of a whole)
  5. 5. Brainstorm on the organizer of your choice: A Groups : How do you and your students use graphic organizers? B Groups :What cognitive functions do graphic organizers support? C Groups : What linguistic features/functions do organizers support?
  6. 6. How do we use organizers? To take notes To help students organize their learning and thinking To scaffold writing
  7. 7. The BIG idea is.. that the power of a graphic organizer is in its transformation. Do your students know how to speak off the map, and write off the map? Can they take an idea and express it using different cognitive skills, on different maps?
  8. 8. How do we use organizers to support cognitive functions? main idea/detail compare& contrast sequence build meaning (vocabulary) brainstorm story map problem/solution cause/effect categorize
  9. 9. Cognitive functions - Marzano
  10. 10. Marzano Thinking Skills • Focusing • Information-gathering • Remembering • Organizing • Analyzing • Generating • Integrating • Evaluating
  11. 11. Thinking Maps – What are they? <ul><li>a “language of visual patterns each based on a fundamental thinking process” </li></ul><ul><li>based on work of Marzano, and David Hyerle (Thinking Maps: A Language for Learning, 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>narrow the field of 400+ organizers to 8, which allows students to master them and apply them across any content area and thinking skill </li></ul><ul><li>are intentionally applied to scaffold English language proficiency </li></ul><ul><li>support language function and the correlating grammatical feature </li></ul>
  12. 12. Thinking Maps are non-linguistic representations of cognitive skills: <ul><li>Defining </li></ul><ul><li>Describing </li></ul><ul><li>Comparing and contrasting </li></ul><ul><li>Classifying </li></ul><ul><li>Whole to part relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Sequencing </li></ul><ul><li>Cause and effect </li></ul><ul><li>Analogies </li></ul>Thinking Maps have a specific graphic for each skill.
  13. 13. Describing: Bubble Map linguistic function: noun + adjective sounds low pitched high pitched pleasant annoying loud soft
  14. 14. rigor Objective aligned to SCOS A high level of difficulty depth challenge Looking at the big idea through multiple layers take it to the top cognitive complexity Faculty meeting Book educated guess educational periodical conversation (Defining in context – circle map) rigor
  15. 15. Compare and Contrast: Double Bubble Linguistic function: forming compound sentences
  16. 16. Classifying: Tree Map Linguistic function: a descriptive sentence
  17. 17. Part to whole: Brace Map
  18. 18. Sequencing: Flow Map
  19. 19. Cause and Effect: Multi-flow Linguistic function: subordinating clauses
  20. 20. Analogy ( the bridge map) as A travel brochure travel an appetizer the entree as this presentation Pathway to Proficiency for ELLs (Thinking Maps) Relating factor: ..whets the appetite for
  21. 21. Get more out of organizers. Build more in. grammatical support visual cues for prosody model the syntax nuances of meaning picture clues
  22. 22. “ Let’s dig in. ” Idiom Illustration Idiom Real meaning Let’s dig in. Let’s get started. Let’s go deeper. (Tree Map: main idea, details)
  23. 23. LoP (Language of Pedagogy): I can extend and adapt a Bubble Map to meet the needs of ELLs using the WIDA standards.
  24. 24. Bubble Maps <ul><li>used for describing </li></ul><ul><li>grammatical feature : noun+adjectives </li></ul>
  25. 25. WIDA level 1, entering, can: <ul><li>point </li></ul><ul><li>Match pictures and statements </li></ul><ul><li>Answer wh- questions </li></ul><ul><li>Label </li></ul><ul><li>draw </li></ul>
  26. 26. Bubble Map for primary grades, level 1 red red blue square tasty yucky round
  27. 27. WIDA level 2, beginning, can: <ul><li>sort </li></ul><ul><li>Follow two step directions </li></ul><ul><li>Match </li></ul><ul><li>Describe </li></ul><ul><li>Restate facts </li></ul><ul><li>Locate and classify information </li></ul><ul><li>list </li></ul>
  28. 28. Decomposers dead things waste nutrients eat eat make <ul><li>Decomposers eat dead things. </li></ul><ul><li>Decomposers eat waste. </li></ul><ul><li>Decomposers make nutrients. </li></ul>Grade 6 science
  29. 29. Your turn. <ul><li>Think of the lesson plan you created this week.Choose WIDA level 1 or 2, and then what lingusitic function or grammatical feature the lesson dictates. Create a bubble map for this lesson. </li></ul><ul><li>Hang onto your bubble map for a gallery walk later. </li></ul>
  30. 30. LoP (Language of Pedagogy): I can extend and adapt a Double Bubble Map to meet the needs of ELLs using the WIDA standards.
  31. 31. WIDA level 3, developing, can: <ul><li>locate, select and order information </li></ul><ul><li>categorize </li></ul><ul><li>Sequence </li></ul><ul><li>Describe processes </li></ul><ul><li>Identify main ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Produce basic expository writing </li></ul><ul><li>Compare/contrast </li></ul><ul><li>retell </li></ul>
  32. 32. Grade 4, Social Studies 3.05 Describe the social history of colonial NC Girls Learned to knit, sew, weave; Made candles, soap, gloves, straw hats, garden Studied reading, writing, history, geography and Latin Attended church and school Lived in the Single Sisters’ House Boys Learned to be shoemakers, carpenters, blacksmiths, baking, brickmaking, tailoring, farmers Studied reading, writing, history, geography and Latin Attended church and school Lived in Single Brothers’ House
  33. 33. The Double Bubble Map Use parallel construction for the two topics. Then find the similarities. girls boys Went to school Went to school Learned to knit, sew, weave Learned to be Farmers, shoemakers, brickmakers Lived in sisters’ house Lived in brothers’house Attended church Attended church
  34. 34. girls boys attended church attended school lived in sister’s house lived in brother’s house learned to knit, sew, weave learned to be farmers, shoemakers, brickmakers ; however ; while and so did
  35. 35. WIDA level 4, expanding, (secondary) can: <ul><li>compare and contrast information </li></ul><ul><li>infer meaning from text </li></ul><ul><li>explain content related concepts </li></ul>
  36. 36. English I, obj. 5.01 interpret literary devices (metaphor) My love is like a red, red rose. red rose thorny fragrant my love gentle Slightly balding fragile beautiful
  37. 37. Your turn. <ul><li>Think of the lesson plan you created this week.Choose WIDA level 3 or 4, and then what lingusitic function or grammatical feature the lesson dictates. Create a double bubble map for this lesson. </li></ul><ul><li>Share your maps at your table, and choose a sample of each type of map to hang on the wall for a gallery walk. </li></ul>
  38. 38. If you want more...
  39. 39. This training will be for 8 sessions, each 1.5 hours long. Plus homework, it will be 20 contact hours, or 2.0 credits. These can be used toward the new requirement of 3.0 credits in your licensed area. Please email me if you are interested. [email_address]

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