Canada Life Sciences Breakfast Tampa Feb 2010

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Canada's life sciences industry strengths

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Canada Life Sciences Breakfast Tampa Feb 2010

  1. 1. Canada: Florida’s Innovation, Investment and International Biotech Partner Life Sciences Breakfast Tampa, February 1, 2010
  2. 2. Overview Background Canada Florida Opportunities Partnerships 2
  3. 3. Background
  4. 4. Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) Canada has diplomatic and consular offices in over Canada has diplomatic and consular offices in over 270 locations in 180 countries. 270 locations in 180 countries. 4
  5. 5. Canada’s Footprint in North America 5
  6. 6. Canada-U.S. Relations Canada and the U.S., a strong partnership Geography, History, Security and Business Canada is Florida’s #1 Economic Partner Common industrial strengths, both depend heavily on international commerce Canada 8th largest economy worldwide, Florida about 15th. 6
  7. 7. Market Access 500 km St. John's 1000 km Edmonton Saskatoon Québec Charlottetown Calgary Regina Winnipeg Fredericton Halifax Victoria Vancouver Ottawa Montréal Seattle Milwaukee Toronto Boston Windsor New York Chicago Cleveland Detroit Philadelphia Pittsburgh Baltimore St. Louis Washington San Francisco Denver Atlanta Los Angeles Houston Miami Mexico City 7
  8. 8. Largest Trading Partner 8
  9. 9. Largest Foreign Investor Investment = Influence 9
  10. 10. A Top Investor in Florida Top Foreign Investors in Florida By Value (billions) By Jobs Germany UK $3.8 45,200 Japan Netherlands $3.79 24,000 UK Canada $3.69 23,100 Canada Germany $2.99 22,400 Australia $2.77 Japan 21,20 10
  11. 11. Canadian Businesses 11
  12. 12. Canadian Businesses 12
  13. 13. Canada
  14. 14. Canadian Health Care Market Population: 33.5 million High health expenditure: CAD $5170 p.p. Long life expectancy: 81.6 years $20B drug market, $6B in medical devices, Top 10 globally Highly profitable: 13% average profit margins Bio-based economy worth $78.3 billion (6.5% of GDP, similar in size to auto) and is responsible for 1 million jobs.
  15. 15. Industry Snapshot Home to 3rd largest Life Sciences industry in the world Key strengths: Biopharmaceutical R&D Medical devices Contract services Leading scientific excellence 15
  16. 16. Life Science Clusters In Canada Atlantic Canada •30 companies •200 employees (1%) British Columbia •$25 M in annual R&D •110 companies • Nutraceuticals & •2500 employees (15%) Marine Bioscience •$300 M in annual R&D • Genomics Prairies •110 companies •1800 employees (11%) Ontario: Quebec •$200 M in annual R&D •220 companies •240 companies • Bioimaging •6000 employees (38%) •5500 employees (35%) •$650 M in annual R&D •$600 M in annual R&D • Stem Cells • Vaccine Research • Drug Development Source: Industry Canada, Statistics Canada, PMPRB. Statistics are for Private sector only 16
  17. 17. Pharmaceutical Industry Snapshot $20 billion domestic market 100+ companies with 40,000+ employees Market dominated by foreign multinationals $1.5 billion in R&D spending Over $4 billion in exports 17
  18. 18. Consumer Pharmaceutical Spending Total annual spending (prescription drugs): $19.3 billion Brand name: $15.2 billion (78.6%) Generic: $4.1 billion (21.4%) Average cost per prescription, $CAD 18
  19. 19. Biopharmaceutical Industry Strengths • Discovery & characterization of therapeutic molecules • Genomics & proteomics platforms • Vaccines & immuno-therapeutics • Regenerative medicine & stem cell research • Drug formulation & delivery systems • Oncology/cancer research • Generic pharmaceuticals
  20. 20. Major Global Investors in Canada 20
  21. 21. Top Sales Leaders in 2008 Leading Pharmaceutical Companies in Canada in 2008 Total Leading R&D Location Market Rank Purchases Companies in Canada Share (%) ($ Billions) 1 Pfizer Montreal 2.57 12.7 2 Apotex Toronto 1.52 7.5 3 AstraZeneca Montreal 1.34 6.6 4 Johnson & Johnson Toronto 1.10 5.5 5 GlaxoSmithKline Toronto 0.97 4.8 6 Novopharm Toronto 0.83 4.1 7 Novartis Toronto 0.75 3.7 8 Abbott Montreal 0.72 3.6 9 Schering-Plough Montreal 0.68 3.4 10 Roche Montreal 0.62 3.1 21
  22. 22. Recent Investments In Canada Sanofi Pasteur • $100M: vaccine R&D facilities in Toronto AstraZeneca Canada Inc. • $10M: pain control research centre in Montreal Glaxo Smith Kline (GSK) • $199M: vaccine production facility in Québec • $50M: vaccine R&D headquarters in Montreal
  23. 23. Leading Canadian Companies (Some Examples) Company Focus Apotex Generics manufacturing Theranostics: detection of protein Amorfix misfolding CNS disorders, pain management, & Biovail cardiovascular disease BioNiche Life Sciences Oncology & animal vaccines Cangene Mfg. of Ab.’s, peptides, & vaccines DiaMedica Therapy for Type II diabetes ImmunoVaccine Vaccine innovation & development Technologies Controlled-release technologies for Labopharm small molecule drugs NAEJA NCE discovery & synthesis Mfg of natural, recombinant, & Prometic Life Sciences synthetic proteins Theratechnologies Peptide-based therapeutics 23
  24. 24. Medical Device Industry Snapshot $6 billion market $2 billion in exports; $4 billion in imports Majority of revenues to multinationals & distributors 200+ developers/manufacturers (90% Canadian owned) 94% of firms have < 50 employees 24
  25. 25. Major Global Investors in Canada 25
  26. 26. Leading Canadian Companies (Some Examples) Company Focus TAXUS® drug-eluting Angiotech coronary stent ART Optical molecular imaging EastMed Uresta® bladder support Blood diagnostic system in Epocal FlexCard™ technology IMRISneuro, Intra- IMRIS operative MRI Radiological imaging & MDS Nordion isotopes Novadaq Operating room imaging Technologies Pyng Medical First Aid Devices Resonant Medical 3D Ultrasound Imaging Urodynamix Urology diagnostics 26
  27. 27. Leading Canadian Companies (Some Examples) Company Focus Axela Protein interaction technology BrightWELL Micro-Flow imaging technology Techologies (MFI) for cell analysis DNA collection & preservation DNA Genotek systems QBM Cell Science Cryopreserved mouse neurons Advanced medical polymers & Rimon Therapeutics biomaterials for wound care Spartan Biosciences Personal DNA analyzers Fast testing of Sepsis & West Spectral Diagnostic Nile Virus 27
  28. 28. Medical Device Strengths In-vitro diagnostics Medical imaging & analysis Nuclear medicine Surgical & implant devices Advanced materials & nanotechnology 28
  29. 29. In-Vitro Diagnostics Examples Include: Epocal’s Blood Diagnostic Spectral Diagnostic’s System in FlexCard™ Testing Kit for West Nile Technology Virus 29
  30. 30. Medical Imaging & Analysis Examples Include: ART’s SoftScan IDC’s DR System Breast Imaging Device 30
  31. 31. Nuclear Medicine Examples Include: MDS Nordion’s Glucotrace® for Cardiology and Oncology Diagnoses using PET Isotopes 31
  32. 32. Surgical & Implant Devices Examples Include: Angiotech’s Drug-Eluting Coronary Stents EastMed’s Uresta® for Stress Urinary Incontinence for Women 32
  33. 33. Latest Innovation World’s First Simulation-Based Brain Surgery Done in Halifax, Canada 2009.08 33
  34. 34. Canada’s Contract Services Subsector THEN: Provided backup supply services to multinational pharmaceutical companies NOW: Grown and become technologically sophisticated World renowned for quick recruiting Adheres to GCP protocols & generates high quality, robust data 4th worldwide in overall share of global clinical trials Top 10 pharmaceutical companies consistently include Canada in clinical development plans & new drug submission data packages
  35. 35. Contract Services: Strengths Contract manufacturers (CMOs) Clinical research organizations (CROs) Design & manufacturing of high value medical devices (surgical devices, implants, imaging systems) Analytical services Regulatory affairs & compliance 35
  36. 36. Leading Canadian Companies Company Focus Research contracting organization specializing in pre-clinical, phase I & bioequivalence Algorithme Pharma studies Clinical trial management company managing multi-site trials & sourcing trial services Allphase Clinical Research globally Manufacturing contracts for both large and small-molecule Advanced Pharmaceutical Biovectra Ingredients (API’s), advanced intermediates, and cGMP bioprocessing reagents MDS Pharma Service Research contracting organization that provides drug discovery and development services Manufacturing contractors committed to the development, manufacturing, purification, and Therapure Biopharma packaging of high-quality biological therapeutics Wellspring Pharmaceutical Manufacturing contracts for specialized dosage forms for clinical & commercial distribution 36
  37. 37. Clinical Trials by Condition Source: ClinicalTrials.gov, Dec. 2008 37
  38. 38. Clinical Trials by Sponsor 38
  39. 39. Florida
  40. 40. Emerging Biotech Cluster Why is Canada interested? Top 10 US biotech clusters US $10b+ NIH funding, most research intensive country in the world, 50% and 40% of global patent applications in med tech and pharma/biotech products, respectively Paradigm shift: globalization of industry and BigPharma looking to fill innovation gap as blockbuster revenue cliff approaches Weaknesses in Florida VC funding Training/Tertiary Education/Skilled Labour Entrepeneurship 40
  41. 41. Opportunities
  42. 42. Strategic Context Post-recession • Technology based firms need international linkages to position themselves for the post-recession economy. • By partnering with other countries on science and technology, firms connect to knowledge, know-how, people, investments and markets abroad. • They also respond to new business model where “biotech clusters will be redefined away from geography and be more virtual built around diseases, pathways, markets, and unique industry segments”. (Burrill & Co. Biotech 2010 – Life Sciences: Adapting for Success). Credit Crunch, Public & Private Capital Drought • VC funding lowest in 15 years both in Canada and the U.S.: ($1 billion in Canada, $235 million in Florida) – however healthcare surpassed IT or cleantech. • PE/Buyout market: Canada 4th in volume, 18th in value of M&A deals, however Canadian funds raised close to $20 billion in 2006-2008 so considerable available capital to deploy. • Only 3 biotech IPOs in 2009, but Burrill expects pick-up to 15 IPOs in 2010 42
  43. 43. Five major factors drive foreign interest in collaborations Attractions include Canada’s: • Strong and stable economy • First-class technological infrastructure • Highly skilled workforce • Lower business and R&D cost structure • Investment incentive programs: the best research incentives in the world 43
  44. 44. Workforce: Educated & Available Higher Education Achievement 55 54,0 53,0 51,4 51,0 50,0 50 47,8 45 % 41,0 41,0 41,0 40,0 40,0 39,8 40 39,0 39,0 35 30 a ng e k um De y da ce an d n Ho ain l S. ae re ar a So por lan pa Ko rw na U. an iw nm Ko Sp lgi Isr Ja Ire a Ta No Fr Ca Be ng ng h ut Si Source: IMD, World Competitiveness Yearbook 2008 44
  45. 45. Workforce: Educated & Available Source: IMD, World Competitiveness Yearbook 2008 45
  46. 46. Low Labor Costs 46
  47. 47. Thriving Clusters 47
  48. 48. Quality Living Environment 48
  49. 49. Canada: An Innovation Leader Canada generates about 4% of global knowledge, as measured by academic publications, a formidable statistic considering it composes only 1% of the global population. Canada leads the G7 in public sector research funding on a per capita basis. Canada has one of the most generous tax-based support programs in the industrialized world through the Scientific Research & Experimental Development tax credit. 49
  50. 50. Canadian Life Sciences Innovation Canada’s health science research community consists of over 64,000 physicians, 30,000 investigators in 17 medical schools, and over 100 teaching hospitals and research institutes. Canadian innovators are internationally recognized for research and product development excellence in genomics,proteomics, vaccine development, medical devices, regenerative medicine (stem cells), protein engineering, immunotherapies and drug delivery systems. Canada Canadian life sciences discoveries: insulin, pacemaker, sequencing Alzheimer genome & H1N1 genome, adult stem cells, how stem cells become blood cells, embryonic stem cells from skin, etc. 50
  51. 51. Canadian university R&D funding programs • Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) • Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) • Canada Research Chairs (CRC) • Genome Canada • Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE) • Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade • National Research Council: • 15 Industrial Partnership Facilities (IPF) business incubators affiliated with NRC’s 21 research institutes -137 firms, 13 graduates 08-09 • Industry Research Assistance Program (IRAP) works with 8000 SMEs, youth internships, Angiotech (anti- inflammation tech) in 5 years $30 milllions 1,500 jobs 51
  52. 52. Innovation and Sector Interface Life Sciences ICT Clean Tech Aerospace $ Pu Valley of b lic Death e iv at Pr Mind Market 52
  53. 53. Investment Growth Capital 2009 TSX: 28 IPOs, $1.8billion TSX-V: 20 IPOs, $69 million 2010 (projected) TSX & TSX-V: $4 billion IPO market 53
  54. 54. Events in Canada BioPartnering North America, Vancouver, Jan 24-26, 2010 BioFinance, Toronto, 6-8 April, 2010 BioContact, Quebec City, Oct. 6-7, 2010 54
  55. 55. Partnerships
  56. 56. Success Stories Stem Cells 56
  57. 57. Success Stories Drug Development 57
  58. 58. Success Stories Research/Education/Simulation/Commercialization 58
  59. 59. Success Stories AIDS/Immunology 59
  60. 60. Success Stories And more… 60
  61. 61. Conclusion Tap into Canadian ideas, knowledge and talent – through strategic alliances, joint ventures, licensing and technology transfer agreements, and venture capital as well as public and private equity investments. Explore the opportunities to make Canadian innovators your technology development and commercialization partners. 61
  62. 62. Contact Info http://twitter.com/claudiopramirez http://www.linkedin.com/in/claudiopramirez http://www.facebook.com/claudiopramirez

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