Revised njask 6 8 part 1

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Revised njask 6 8 part 1

  1. 1. NJ ASK LAL GRADES 6-8<br />1<br />
  2. 2. 2<br />
  3. 3. 3<br />
  4. 4. 4<br />
  5. 5. Patricia Hutton<br />CMSCE<br />http://cmsce.rutgers.edu<br />pjhutton@aol.com<br />tikap@aol.com<br />5<br />
  6. 6. 6<br />Take a few minutes and share with a partner:<br />What skills do you think your students need to master before they take NJ ASK?<br />When you have identified a specific skill, please enter it in the chat area<br /> or type it below.<br />
  7. 7. Overview of the New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJ ASK)<br />Assesses skills in 4 content clusters:<br />• Writing<br />• Reading<br />• Working with Text [Interpreting Text]<br />• Analyzing/Critiquing Text<br />ASSESSMENT CLUSTER TASK<br />1. Writing: persuasive<br />2. Reading: narrative MC, OE<br />3. Writing: explain<br />4. Reading: everyday text MC, OE questions<br />7<br />
  8. 8. Two text types: narrative and everyday<br /> multiple-choice and open-ended questions<br />Students will:<br />• recognize main idea and details<br />• draw inferences and conclusions<br />• recognize organizational structure of text <br />• determine a purpose for reading<br />• make predictions<br />• identify and understand literary elements<br />8<br />
  9. 9. Changes in NJ ASK LAL<br />More reading passages <br />More diverse content <br />Shorter reading passage lengths <br />New types of writing prompts <br />More test items overall <br />More score points overall<br />9<br />
  10. 10. Text types/Strand Reading MC OE Writing Tasks Total Points Time <br /> <br />Persuasive Prompt 1 12 45<br />Expository Prompt 1 625<br />Narrative Reading 2 20 4 36 80 <br />AT* per passage 4-6 <br />WT* per passage 4-6<br />Informational Text 2 162 2460 <br />AT* per passage 3-5 <br />WT* per passage 3-5<br />Total Items3662<br /> <br />Total Points by Item Type3624 1878<br />Total LAL Testing Time 2 days, 2 hrs. per day (with field test)<br />NJ ASK 5-8 Language Arts Literacy <br />*AT: Analyzing Text; WT: Working with Text <br /> <br />11<br />
  11. 11. Working with Text Questions<br />Recognizing a central idea or theme and supporting details-<br />– Well, for me, the worst—and I mean the worst—was my dad on the Fourth of July. Now don’t get me wrong—my dad’s a great guy and a good father and I love him and all that. But how many fathers that you know are into bird calling. That’s right, bird calling. In public. I know this all sounds pretty weird, but it’s true. You see, there’s a big fair in our town on the Fourth of July—one of those fairs with rides and games and lots of food. And there’s this bird-calling contest too, with people up on a stage, imitating different kinds of birds in front of judges. <br />What is the main idea? Supporting details?<br />11<br />
  12. 12. When Sam says “The rest of my life as a normal kid depended on it” in paragraph 16, the author is using:<br />A. an idiom.<br />B. flashback.<br />C. exaggeration.<br />D. a comparison.<br />What type of question is this? How do you know?<br />12<br />
  13. 13. Analyzing/Critiquing Text (NJ ASK) – <br />Usually open-ended<br /><ul><li>predict meanings
  14. 14. draw conclusions
  15. 15. form opinions about the text
  16. 16. author's techniques.
  17. 17. textual conventions and literary elements </li></ul>13<br />
  18. 18. Analyzing Text Questions<br />Questioning, Clarifying, Predicting- <br />open-ended items<br />As the article explains, Sybil Ludington was a real person.<br />• How did Sybil’s actions affect the American Revolution?<br />• How could this historic ride influence other people?<br />Use specific information from the article and any additional insight to support your response.<br />Forming opinions-<br />open-ended items<br />Tiger is surprised by Fox’s reaction to him.<br />• Is Fox afraid of Tiger? Explain.<br />• Do you think the other animals should fear Tiger? Why or why not? <br />Use specific information from the story and any additional insight to support your response.<br />14<br />
  19. 19. Narrative Text<br /> Written totell a story <br />Establishes or develops a conflict<br /> Addresses themes of human existence <br />Narrative 500 - 1,000 words in length<br />strong thematic focus with:<br />• a problem/conflict and resolution<br />• a well-organized plot<br />• well-developed characters<br />• literary elements i.e. imagery and foreshadowing<br />15<br />
  20. 20. Sample Questions Released by NJ<br />What does Sam’s father do at the bird-calling contest that most embarrasses Sam?<br />A. He makes funny faces.<br />B. He waves to the crowd.<br />C. He always wins first prize.<br />D. He does the call incorrectly.<br />The purpose of this story is to<br />A. entertain readers with an amusing tale.<br />B. teach readers about different types of birds.<br />C. persuade readers to try bird calling as a hobby.<br />D. inform readers of the different events at the fair.<br />16<br />What type of question is each?<br />setting <br />character<br />plot<br />author's purpose<br />inference<br />cause-effect<br />vocabulary<br />prediction<br />
  21. 21. How would you model analyzing these questions for your students?<br /> In paragraph 14, the word indignation means <br />A. fear.<br />B. insult.<br />C. happiness.<br />D. admiration. <br />Why do the animals walk right by Tiger when he is hunting? <br />A. They do not see Tiger. <br />B. They are not afraid of Tiger.<br />C. They know Tiger will not eat them.<br />D. Tiger tells them to play at that time. <br /> When the author writes that “Stories told of how difficult this creature was to catch, but Tiger welcomed the challenge,” he means that Tiger was <br />A. uncertain if he could catch this new animal.<br />B. pleased to have another animal act as king.<br />C. eager to hunt an animal that is difficult to catch.<br />D. interested in how to hunt by watching the other animals. <br /> Which theme best fits this story? <br />A. Pride can lead to jealousy. <br />B. Good things rarely last forever. <br />C. New people bring fresh ideas with them.<br />D. A strong mind is as valuable as a strong body. <br />17<br />
  22. 22. In paragraph 20, what does Ida mean when she says, “I left that classroom and went into the story”?<br />A. She went to the library and found another book to read.<br />B. She forgot she was nervous and started to enjoy the story.<br />C. She became tired of the story, so she made one up instead.<br />D. She felt the room was too loud, so she went someplace quiet. <br />What lesson does Ida learn in the chapter?<br />A. Always help adults when they are feeling ill.<br />B. Try new things, even when they are challenging.<br />C. Always practice reading to yourself before you read to others.<br />D. Keep trying to get things right, even when people laugh at you.<br />18<br />
  23. 23. Which best describes how Inez feels about her father’s work after their trip to the salt mine?<br /> She has a greater respect for his work.<br /> She hopes to have the same kind of experience again.<br /> She thinks he should not keep his job.<br /> She decides it is not as appealing as she imagined. <br /> Which sentence best supports the idea that Inez is excited about her father’s surprise?<br /> She didn’t know what to expect, but she knew she would love being with her father.<br /> When she had agreed to go with her father on his newspaper assignment, she had pictured an adventure, not hard labor.<br /> She could taste the salt in her mouth, smell it in the air, and feel it on her skin.<br /> Apparently her father’s experience in the salt mine was different from hers.<br />19<br />
  24. 24. Open Ended Questions<br />20<br />PointsCriteria<br />4 Clearly demonstrates understanding of the task, completes all requirements, and provides an insightful explanation/ opinion that links to or extends aspects of the text.<br /> <br />3 Demonstrates an understanding of the task, completes all requirements, and provides some explanation/ opinion using situations or ideas from the text as support.<br /> <br />2 May address all of the requirements, but demonstrates a partial understanding<br /> of the task, and uses text incorrectly or with limited success resulting in an inconsistent or flawed explanation.<br /> <br /> Demonstrates minimal understanding of the task, does not complete the requirements, and provides only a vague reference to or no use of the text.<br />0 Irrelevant or off- topic.<br /> <br />
  25. 25. Near the end of the story, the author says, “Something smelled of trickery.”• As used in this story, what does this phrase mean?• Explain why Fox was able to outsmart Tiger.Use specific information from the story and any additional insight to support your response.<br />The phrase “Something smelled of trickery” means that<br />Tiger was able to tell a little that he was being fooled by Fox.<br />There really wasn’t a smell, but he could feel something was<br />happening. It’s kind of like when you know something isn’t<br />right, but are not quite sure what it is. That’s the way Tiger<br />felt. Tiger was just not smart enough to realize what Fox<br />was doing. See, Fox was having Tiger follow him. He said<br />to Tiger “Walk with me in the jungle.” When Tiger did this,<br />the animals were all afraid of him. But Tiger thought they<br />were doing that because Fox had told him that HE scared the<br />animals. If he maybe had a moment longer, Tiger would<br />have realized he was tricked. But it happened so fast, and he let<br />Fox go. This is kind of like when I trick my younger brother<br />into doing one of my chores. He just isn’t old enough yet to figure out how I do it. Sometimes<br /> we don’t always see what’s really going on around us, so we need to pay careful attention<br />to how people act and why they act the way they do.<br />21<br />Score ___________<br />
  26. 26. This 4-point response demonstrates that the student synthesized the passage and has a clear understanding of the task. The student uses relevant text to explain Fox’s deception (He said to Tiger “Walk with me in the jungle”) and provides appropriate insight and elaboration to draw a meaningful conclusion from Fox’s actions. (This is kind of like when I trick my younger brother into doing one of my chores. He just isn’t old enough yet to figure out how I do it.<br />22<br />
  27. 27. The phrase “Something smelled of trickery” means that the Tiger could smell that the Fox was tricking him. Tiger could not believe that all the animals were afraid of Fox. He looked around in disbelief. But he did not know what was really happening. Fox was tricking him. Fox could trick him because he could be much smarter.<br />23<br />Score______________<br />
  28. 28. The student provides an inaccurate answer to the meaning of the phrase “Something smelled of trickery.” (Tiger could smell that the Fox was tricking him.) The student answers the second part of the task (Fox could trick him because he could be much smarter) but provides no text support or elaboration. Without additional explanation and insight, this 2-point response demonstrates only a partial understanding of the task.<br />24<br />
  29. 29. 25<br />This phrase means that Tiger could tell something was wrong. Could it be possible that this small doglike creature was truly King of the Animals? He could outsmart Tiger because he acted smarter than him.<br />Score__________________<br />
  30. 30. 26<br />The student provides a brief answer to the questions with no support. The student attempts to provide textual support, but the line is not developed in the student’s response and it does not relate to the task in a meaningful way. (Could it be possible that this small doglike creature was truly King of the Animals?) This 1-point response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the task.<br />
  31. 31. Take 2 or 3 minutes to share with a partner one strategy you have used to work with open-ended questions. <br />Leave a message in chat or typed below listing the strategy.<br />27<br />
  32. 32. NJ Samples<br />Think about how Sam changed on the last Fourth of July when his cousin Rob visited.<br />• Explain how Sam’s attitude toward the bird-calling contest changed throughout that day.<br />• Predict how Sam will react to the unique interests of others now.<br />Use specific information from the story and any additional insight to support your response.<br /> The story is told completely from Sam’s point of view. Think about how the story would be different if it were told from Sam’s father’s point of view.<br />• Why would Sam’s father agree to go to the restaurant instead of going to the bird-calling contest? Explain.<br />• How would Sam’s father feel about Sam changing his mind? Explain.<br />Use specific information from the story and any additional insight to support your response.<br />28<br />How would you teach students to address these questions?<br />
  33. 33. 29<br />How would you teach students to address these questions?<br /> Near the end of the story, the author says, “Something smelled of trickery.” <br />• As used in this story, what does this phrase mean? <br />• Explain why Fox was able to outsmart Tiger. <br />Use specific information from the story and any additional insight to support your response. <br /> Tiger is surprised by Fox’s reaction to him.<br />• Is Fox afraid of Tiger? Explain.<br />• Do you think the other animals should fear Tiger? Why or why not? <br />Use specific information from the story and any additional insight to support your response.<br />
  34. 34. RSSE<br />Restate- put the question into your own words<br />Support- provide an example or argument<br />Support- provide another example or argument<br />Extend- make connections(text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world)<br />30<br />
  35. 35. In this story, Kia does not agree with her mother’s decision to let the bird go free. <br />• Tell two reasons Kia’s mother gives for letting the bird go. <br />• Do you agree with Kia’s mother’s decision? Explain why or why not. <br />Use information from the story to support your response. <br />Restate- In the story, Kia and her mother disagree about letting the bird go free.<br />Support- Kia’s mother feels that the bird will die in captivity because it will miss its lifestyle and other birds. She also says that it is beautiful flying free so she lets the bird go.<br />Support- Kia, on the other hand, wants to protect the bird as their family pet. She thinks she can provide food and shelter. She does not take the time to look at the other needs the bird has- company of his own kind and the opportunity to use its instincts in nature.<br />Extend- I agree with Kia’s mother’s decision to let the bird go free because it has lived as a wild creature before it was injured. The bird needs to be in a natural habitat to thrive. Even though Kia feels she will love the bird sometimes it is necessary to do what is best for the person/pet you love.<br />31<br />
  36. 36. Activities to Support Comprehension<br />32<br />Question-Answer Relationship Strategy - answer and compose literal<br />questions (“Right There”), inferential questions (“Author & Me” or “Think & Search”), andcritical questions (“On My Own”) <br />Create webs ofmajor ideas based on the text. Each student in each group adds to the web using a differentcolored marker, which enables the teacher to monitor each student’s thinking.<br />After reading a novel, students identify someonereal or fictional that they would like to introduce to one character in the novel andwrite a brief explanation.<br />Students identify literary characters who are most like themselves. They discuss the value<br />of including realistic characters in novels.<br />Students discuss the details of the setting in a novel. They analyze whichdetails contribute<br /> most to conveying the mood, the time period, and the location.<br />
  37. 37. Can you add to the strategy list?<br />33<br />
  38. 38. Concept Map<br />34<br />
  39. 39. Resources<br />The Department of Education offers four sources of information about the NJ ASK:<br />• Web site: http://www.state.nj.us/education<br />• Web site: http://www.ets.org/njask<br />• Web site: http://www.njpep.org/assessment<br />• Office of State Assessments<br />609-341-3456<br />Mailing address:<br />New Jersey Department of Education<br />P.O. Box 500<br />Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0500<br />http://www.neaq.org/scilearn/kids/babypeng.html <br />http://www.doe.mass.edu/mcas/2009/release/<br />http://www.doe.virginia.gov/VDOE/Assessment/Release2008/index.html<br />http://www.nj.gov/education/njpep/assessment/3_4/grade3_4.html<br />http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/resources/online/2009/taks_g04_read/4reading.htm<br />35<br />
  40. 40. Patricia Hutton<br />CMSCE<br />pjhutton@aol.com<br />tikap@aol.com<br />36<br />
  41. 41. 37<br />

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