Hackensack strat

999 views

Published on

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Hackensack strat

  1. 1. Test Prep Activities<br />NJ ASK Grades 3-4<br />1<br />
  2. 2. KWL<br />Cloze<br />Anticipation Guide<br />Semantic Feature Analysis<br />2<br />Pre-Reading Strategies<br />
  3. 3. First Lines-<br />students: <br /> anticipate what the text is about prior to reading<br />activate prior knowledge <br /> actively participate<br />Use the strategy<br />Students read the first line of the assigned text.<br />Students make predictions. <br />Students support predictions with information from the text. <br /> Discuss predictions.<br />After reading, students review their predictions and make changes or additions. <br />anticipation guide<br />3<br />First Predictions<br />
  4. 4. 4<br />
  5. 5. Think-Pair-Share<br />Teacher Think Alouds<br />Two column Notes<br />5<br />During Reading <br />
  6. 6. Concept Maps- visualize connections -help students to make meaningful connections <br />Use the strategy<br />model how to identify major ideas<br />organize ideas into categories<br />use lines or arrows to show how ideas are connected<br />share concept maps in pairs or small groups to encourage students to reflect on different strategies for making connections<br />use the concept map to summarize a reading or to create a study guide <br />6<br />During Reading continued<br />
  7. 7. MindMapper (http://www.mindmapper.com/homepage.htm) <br />SmartDraw (http://www.smartdraw.com/specials/flowchart.asp) <br />Concept Draw (http://www.conceptdraw.com/en/products/mindmap/main.php) <br />SMART Ideas (http://www.smarttech.com/products/smartideas/index.asp) <br />Inspiration (http://www.inspiration.com/productinfo/Inspiration/index.cfm) <br />Knowledge Manager (http://www.knowledgemanager.us/KM-KnowledgeManager-eng.htm<br />7<br />
  8. 8. Story Maps- visual representations to organize elements of a story -summarizes main ideas, characters, setting, and plot.<br />Story Elements<br />Characters -Who are the people in the story?<br />Which ones played major roles?<br />Which ones were minor?<br />Setting -Where and when did this story take place? Over what period of time?<br />Plot -Problem/Goal(inciting event): What set events in motion? What problem arose, or what were the main characters trying to do??<br />Events/Episodes- the key steps or events that tell the story<br />Resolution/Outcome- How was the problem solved? Did characters reach their goal? <br />Theme -The larger meaning , the moral, the message the author wanted to convey the "so what?“<br />blank plot chartsample<br />another example<br />lesson plan<br />8<br />
  9. 9. 9<br />
  10. 10. 10<br />
  11. 11. The plot of a story follows a pattern<br />11<br />Climax<br />Rising Action<br />Falling Action<br />Exposition<br />Resolution<br />
  12. 12. Think Alouds- students learn to monitor thinking as they read<br />Use the strategy<br />Model your thinking as you read aloud and students read the same text silently. Use points in the text that may be confusing for students (new vocabulary, unusual sentence construction<br />develop questions to support thinking aloud <br />What do I know about this topic? <br />What do I think I will learn about this topic? <br />Do I understand what I just read? <br />Do I have a clear picture in my head about this information? <br />What more can I do to understand this? <br />What were the most important points in this reading? <br />What new information did I learn? <br />How does it fit in with what I already know? <br />give students opportunities to practice in pairs, small groups or individually <br />Lesson<br />Example with poem<br />12<br />
  13. 13. Paragraph Shrinking- main idea<br />Use the strategy<br />Create pairs<br />Model the activity<br />Each member of the pair takes turns being "Coach" and "Player."<br />Each student reads aloud for five minutes. After each paragraph, students summarize the main points:<br />the who or what of the paragraph; <br />the most important information about who or what; and <br />the main idea <br />If a "Player" gives a wrong answer, the "Coach" asks the "Player" to skim the paragraph and try again. Students state the main idea in ten words or less. <br />13<br />
  14. 14. Sticky Notes<br />Graphic Organizers<br />RAFT<br />Summarizing (Somebody,Wants,But,So)<br />14<br />Post Reading Strategies<br />
  15. 15. After Reading<br />Use the strategy<br />At the end of lesson, ask students to respond to a prompt presented orally or in writing<br />students write their responses<br />As students leave, they turn in exit slips.<br />Review the exit slips as an informal assessment<br />Exit Slips-<br /> three types of exit slips :<br />document learning<br />Ex. Write one thing you learned today.<br />Ex. Discuss how today's lesson could be used in the real world.<br />the process of learning <br />Ex. I didn't understand…<br />Ex. Write one question you have about today's lesson.<br />evaluate the effectiveness of the lesson<br />Ex. Did you enjoy working in small groups today?<br />Other exit prompts are:<br />I would like to learn more about…<br />Please explain more about…<br />The most important thing I learned today is…<br />The thing that surprised me the most today was…<br />I wish…<br />15<br />
  16. 16. Question-Answer Relationship (QAR)- students analyze what types of questions they are being asked and where to find the answers to them.<br />Right There Questions: answers found in text<br />Think and Search Questions: Information from several parts of the text synthesized to make meaning. <br />Author and You: questions based on information that the student relates to their own experience. not directly in the text, but the student reads the text to answer the question.<br />On My Own: Students use their background or prior knowledge to answer the question.<br />Use the strategy<br />Model, model, model!<br />Define each type of question and give an example.<br />Read a short passage to your students.<br /> Read questions you have already designed and model how you decide its type.<br />Show your students how find information to answer the question (i.e., in the text, from your own experiences, etc.).<br />Have students practice independently or in pairs.<br />16<br />
  17. 17. Expository Text Prediction Chart<br />Title of the Selection____________________________<br />place words<br />time words<br />problems<br />1)<br />2)<br />3)<br />people<br />Big Idea/Purpose<br />specific<br />genre<br />your questions<br />1)<br />2)<br />3)<br />17<br />
  18. 18. 18<br />
  19. 19. 19<br />
  20. 20. Somebody/Wanted/But/So: Use this technique to assist students in writing a basic summary.<br />Concept Circles: These circles can be used many ways:<br />notes in word or picture form<br />define vocabulary or a central concept<br />20<br />Strategies & Resources<br />
  21. 21. Fat & Skinny Questions:<br />(or Thick & Thin Questions) Encourage students to ask “FAT” questions that begin with phrases such as: What if?<br /> Why did?<br />What would happen if?<br />How would you feel if?<br />Laura Candler’s web-site provides resources and lesson ideas for every subject area.<br />21<br />STRATEGIES continued:<br />
  22. 22. 22<br />Reading Journal For Questioning The Author<br />
  23. 23. 23<br />
  24. 24. 24<br />
  25. 25. 25<br />Effect #1<br />Cause<br />Effect #2<br />Effect #3<br />Solution #1<br />Problem<br />Solution #2<br />Solution #3<br />
  26. 26. 26<br />
  27. 27. 27<br />Subject or Title<br />Who<br />What<br />Where<br />When<br />How<br />Literal Comprehension<br />Making Inferences<br />What do I know?<br />What does the text tell me?<br />Making Conclusions<br />What does the information tell me?<br />What three conclusions can I draw?<br />Comparing/Contrasting<br />How are the subjects/characters/events/examples alike? Different?<br />Evaluating<br />Do I agree with the information presented?<br />Why?<br />What is my evidence?<br />
  28. 28. 28<br />Finding Clues In A Story<br /> Tommy and Sarah just got off the school bus. Sarah said, “I smell smoke.” Tommy pointed and yelled, “Sarah, look at the smoke coming out of that house!”<br /> In a moment they both heard what sounded like a fire engine siren. <br />The passage suggests that –<br />The house is on fire, and someone called to report it.<br />The house is on fire, and no one called to report it.<br />Someone was burning leaves in the back yard.<br />This was a fire drill.<br />
  29. 29. 29<br />Drawing Conclusions<br /> Pretend you are at Wal Mart. As you are walking down the candy aisle, you notice a little boy crying and pulling on his mom’s skirt as she pushes her cart towards the front of the store. The closer she gets towards the front of the store, the louder the little boy screams.<br /> Lots of things could be wrong with the little boy, BUT we can probably conclude that—<br /> What do you conclude? Click on the speaker below to hear what I think. Of course, I could be wrong.<br />
  30. 30. 30<br />Another Crying Little Boy<br /> Pretend you are at the doctor’s office to get a shot. That same little boy you saw at Wal Mart is sitting there screaming his head off just like he did in the candy aisle.<br /> What can you conclude this time?<br />F. He is still angry about not getting the candy.<br />G. He has an ear ache. <br />H. He is scared because he is there for a shot.<br />J. He just cries a lot.<br />
  31. 31. 31<br />More Clues <br /> Pretend you are at the doctor’s office to get a shot. That same little boy you saw at Wal Mart is sitting there screaming his head off just like he did in the candy aisle. His mom is rocking him in her arms. He keeps pulling at his right ear<br /> What can you conclude this time?<br />F. He is still angry about not getting the candy.<br />G. He has an ear ache. <br />H. He is scared because he is there for a shot.<br />J. He just cries a lot.<br />
  32. 32. 32<br />Finding Clues In A Story.<br /> Maria was on the flag squad that performed at half time during football games. It was the first game that her grandparents and uncle Luigi attended. Maria waved her flag while looking for her family in the large crowd. Just as she spotted her grandmother, her greatest fear came true. She lost her grip on the flag, and it started to fall. Even though she caught it quickly, Maria’s face became red. She felt as if she had made a horrible mistake and everyone were staring at her.<br />The passage suggests that Maria almost dropped her flag partly because she -- <br />A was thinking about the football game<br />B wasn’t strong enough<br />C was looking for her family<br />D was frightened by a loud noise<br />
  33. 33. 33<br />Finding Clues In A Story.<br /> Maria was on the flag squad that performed at half time during football games. It was the first game that her grandparents and uncle Luigi attended. Maria waved her flag while looking for her family in the large crowd. Just as she spotted her grandmother, her greatest fear came true. She lost her grip on the flag, and it started to fall. Even though she caught it quickly, Maria’s face became red. She felt as if she had made a horrible mistake and everyone were staring at her.<br />The passage suggests that Maria almost dropped her flag partly because she -- <br />A was thinking about the football game<br />B wasn’t strong enough<br />C was looking for her family<br />D was frightened by a loud noise<br />
  34. 34. 34<br />The Tasmanian Devil<br /> One of the rarest animals in the world is the Tasmanian Devil. I’m not talking about the one you see in cartoons, but the real wolf-like animal that lives on the island of Tasmania. <br /> Every few years someone claims to see one, but they never have proof. A few years ago, some scientists who were studying plants found a skeleton, teeth and some skin in a remote area of Tasmania. They were excited as they believed they had found the remains of the rare Tasmanian Devil. They drew a picture of what they thought the animal may have looked like when it was alive. The scientists then sent the picture along with the skeleton, teeth and skin to Washington D.C.<br />What did the scientists probably do with the skeleton, teeth and bones?<br />F Sent them to a country with more experienced scientists.<br />G Made clothing, jewelry, and other ornaments out of them<br />H Studied them carefully and compared them to other animals<br />J Sold them to museums that displayed them<br />
  35. 35. Inferring setting<br />Sometimes the author doesn’t come out and explain the setting. Can you make an inference with the paragraph below? <br />Anna sighed. She hated having to do so many chores. Her mother was always telling her to fetch the water from the well, watch her brothers and sisters, and fetch wood for the fire. “I wish that I could go to school,” she sighed, looking at her bare feet. But with her father in the Union Army, she had to help her mother.<br />35<br />
  36. 36. Anna sighed. She hated having to do so many chores. Her mother was always telling her to fetch the water from the well, watch her brothers and sisters, and fetch wood for the fire. “I wish that I could go to school,” she sighed, looking at her bare feet. But with her father in the Union Army, she had to help her mother.<br />36<br />Inferring setting<br />The clues tell us that this happens in the past. Can you guess the exact time period? There is a clue!<br />
  37. 37. Pennsylvania has many historic sites. You can visit Revolutionary war sites, like Valley Forge. You can also visit important locations from the Civil War, like Gettysburg. Finally, you can also see the site of the first oil well in Titusville. Pennsylvania has many neat places to visit!<br />Through the ages, Pennsylvania has seen many interesting events. The state was founded in 1681 by William Penn. Later, Pennsylvania was the site of important Revolutionary War battles. After that, Pennsylvania was home to new factories during the Industrial Revolution. Today, Pennsylvania continues to make history.<br />37<br />Which paragraph is in chronological order?<br />
  38. 38. Through the ages, Pennsylvania has seen many interesting events. The state was founded in 1681 by William Penn. Later, Pennsylvania was the site of important Revolutionary War battles. After that, Pennsylvania was home to new factories during the Industrial Revolution. Today, Pennsylvania continues to make history.<br />38<br />Which paragraph is in chronological order?<br />This is the paragraph in chronological order. Can you find the clue words that show this order?<br />
  39. 39. The night’s snowstorm had many effects. People were out shoveling snow from their sidewalks. The power lines were draped with ice. Snow plows drove down every street. Children were the happiest of all. The unexpected snow caused school to be cancelled!<br />39<br />Can you find the clue words?<br />
  40. 40. The night’s snowstorm had many effects. People were out shoveling snow from their sidewalks. The power lines were draped with ice. Snow plows drove down every street. Children were the happiest of all. The unexpected snow caused school to be cancelled!<br />40<br />Can you find the clue words?<br />
  41. 41. Park School had a terrible problem. Every day at recess, students would argue over the slides. Teachers had to spend time every day taking care of the arguments. Finally, one teacher came up with a great solution. They bought another set of slides that everyone could enjoy.<br />Can you find the problem and the solution in this paragraph?<br />41<br />An example of problem and solution<br />
  42. 42. Make an inference!<br />Luisa looked out at the sparkling water. “This is so much better than home!” she sighed. “I love this place!”<br />Where is Luisa? What is she doing?<br />Think of your background knowledge about palm trees and where they grow<br />42<br />
  43. 43. What is figurative language?<br />The teacher glared like a furious dragon.<br />Was the teacher really a dragon?<br />What is the author trying to tell us about the teacher?<br />43<br />
  44. 44. How can I interpret figurative language?<br />The tree stood tall and proud by the curving path.<br />How is this sentence showing the tree doing something that trees don’t really do?<br />44<br />
  45. 45. How can I interpret figurative language?<br />The four students sat down at the cafeteria table and ate like pigs.<br />What is being compared in this simile?<br />45<br />
  46. 46. How can I interpret figurative language?<br />The school was a maze of hallways and passages<br />What is being compared in this metaphor?<br />46<br />
  47. 47. 47<br />
  48. 48. How do you visualize?<br />You use the words in the text to make a picture in your mind<br />It’s like seeing a “movie in your mind”<br />Visualize this: <br />A green tractor<br />48<br />
  49. 49. Your mental image<br />How was your mental image different from the one on the screen?<br />We use our background knowledge to help us visualize what is in the text<br />Different people bring different background knowledge, and so they visualize differently<br />49<br />
  50. 50. The purple flowers bloomed, lifting their petals up to the sun. They were surrounded by the bright green lily pads that covered the surface of the pond.<br />Can you picture this scene in your mind?<br />50<br />Try this:<br />
  51. 51. Did your mental image look like this?<br /> The purple flowers bloomed, lifting their petals up to the sun. They were surrounded by the bright green lily pads that covered the surface of the pond.<br />51<br />
  52. 52. “What a day for a class trip!” Ricky said.<br />“I know. I can’t wait to get back in the boats and go canoeing some more,” Ana replied.<br />“I just wish it weren’t so cold,” Ricky sighed.<br />52<br />You can visualize whenever you read<br />Try sketching what you visualize based on the dialogue below.<br />
  53. 53. Reading test practice<br />NAEP question database<br />reading strategies<br />interactive activities<br />paraphrasing informational text<br />25 reading strategies<br />4th grade links:<br />describing solutions to problems<br />cause and effect<br />main idea<br />inferences about character traits<br />author's purpose<br />comparisons and contrasts<br />interactive persuasive writing/<br />53<br />Online Test Prep<br />
  54. 54. read write think<br />3rd grade interactive activities<br />interactivie writing tools<br />Prompts<br />internet writing activities<br />writing prompts by grade level<br />54<br />Resources<br />
  55. 55. Patricia Hutton<br />CMSCE<br />http://cmsce.rutgers.edu<br />pjhutton@aol.com<br />tikap@aol.com<br />55<br />
  56. 56. 56<br />

×