Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Key WorkforceFactsDecember 2011
More than 2.5 million home care workersSource: Caring in America, p. 4.
Performing tasks in 4 realms• Self-care assistance• Everyday tasks• Social supports• Paramedical tasks
Among the fastest growing jobs in the country, 2008-2018Source: PHI, Facts 1: Occupational Projections for Direct-CareWork...
Among the jobs adding the most newpositions (due to growth), 2008-2018Source: PHI, Facts 1: Occupational Projections for D...
Home care worker demographics• Mostly female (88% female)• Older (50% over age 45)• 60% non-white• 55% with high school ed...
Main employers• Home care agencies   providing non-medical personal   care services• Consumers and families
Growth in home care business locations (“establishments”)Source: Caring in America, p. 20.
Estimated industry revenue (millions of dollars)Source: Caring in America, p. 22.
Wages are low and stagnantSource: Caring in America, p. 53.
Uncompetitive wagesSource: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, 2010.
Part-time work commonSource: Caring in America, p. 61.
High rates of uninsuranceSource: Caring in America, p. 55.
Public subsidies required to meet basic needs Source: Caring in America, p. 58.
Turnover endemic• Small-scale studies show PCA turnover at 44 - 65%• 2007 National Home Health Aide Survey: 35% of   home ...
Incidence of overtime modest  9% percentage of home care workers  nationally that report working more than 40  hours/week ...
Involuntary part-time work -- a far biggerproblemSource: Caring in America, p. 61.
Agencies charge nearly twice what caregivers are paid           Type of Service         National Average Cost           Na...
For more information, contact:   Dorie Seavey, Director of Policy Research   dseavey@phinational.org ● 617-630-1694   Abby...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Caring in America: A Guide to America’s Home Care Workforce

3,424 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Be the first to comment

Caring in America: A Guide to America’s Home Care Workforce

  1. Key WorkforceFactsDecember 2011
  2. More than 2.5 million home care workersSource: Caring in America, p. 4.
  3. Performing tasks in 4 realms• Self-care assistance• Everyday tasks• Social supports• Paramedical tasks
  4. Among the fastest growing jobs in the country, 2008-2018Source: PHI, Facts 1: Occupational Projections for Direct-CareWorkers, 2008-2018.
  5. Among the jobs adding the most newpositions (due to growth), 2008-2018Source: PHI, Facts 1: Occupational Projections for Direct-CareWorkers, 2008-2018.
  6. Home care worker demographics• Mostly female (88% female)• Older (50% over age 45)• 60% non-white• 55% with high school education or less• A quarter foreign bornSource: Caring in America, p. 10.
  7. Main employers• Home care agencies providing non-medical personal care services• Consumers and families
  8. Growth in home care business locations (“establishments”)Source: Caring in America, p. 20.
  9. Estimated industry revenue (millions of dollars)Source: Caring in America, p. 22.
  10. Wages are low and stagnantSource: Caring in America, p. 53.
  11. Uncompetitive wagesSource: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, 2010.
  12. Part-time work commonSource: Caring in America, p. 61.
  13. High rates of uninsuranceSource: Caring in America, p. 55.
  14. Public subsidies required to meet basic needs Source: Caring in America, p. 58.
  15. Turnover endemic• Small-scale studies show PCA turnover at 44 - 65%• 2007 National Home Health Aide Survey: 35% of home health aides intend to quit in next year (~56,000 workers)• Turnover “predictors” – Low wages – Not enough hours – No reimbursement for travel costsSource: Caring in America, Section 10.
  16. Incidence of overtime modest 9% percentage of home care workers nationally that report working more than 40 hours/week Why so low? • Most states are “low-hour” Medicaid states • Many agencies use staffing and scheduling practices that minimize overtimeSource: Caring in America, Section 8.
  17. Involuntary part-time work -- a far biggerproblemSource: Caring in America, p. 61.
  18. Agencies charge nearly twice what caregivers are paid Type of Service National Average Cost National Average of Services (per hour) Starting Pay for Caregivers (per hour) Companionship $18.75 $8.92 Homemaker Services $18.90 $9.10 Personal Care $19.82 $9.69 Home Health Services $22.37 $11.78Source: National Private Duty Association (2009) State of CaregivingIndustry Survey.
  19. For more information, contact: Dorie Seavey, Director of Policy Research dseavey@phinational.org ● 617-630-1694 Abby Marquand, Policy Research Associate amarquand@phinational.org ● 718-928-2062Visit PHI PolicyWorks at: www.phinational.org/policy

×