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Voice Application Product Strategy - Voice Summit 2018

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Getting serious about voice interaction means treating it as a first-class digital product. Find out what's crucial to making that happen.

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Voice Application Product Strategy - Voice Summit 2018

  1. 1. Voice Application Product Strategy Phillip Hunter @designoutloud Pulse Labs VP of Product
  2. 2. Problem statement The majority of voice apps are experiments and water-testers. We’re not treating voice apps as first class digital products like those people are used to.
  3. 3. Good products Clarity of purpose Non-trivial, uncommon benefit Comfortable interaction Consequential content Engaging emotion Gratification
  4. 4. Good voice app products Differentiated from mobile and web Faster, easier, more enjoyable
  5. 5. Exchanging information Transacting Amusement and time-filling Interactive and not Use case opportunities
  6. 6. Closer look Destination information Comprehensive Ask for nearly anything Relevant and informative Inspiring Answers you care about
  7. 7. Closer look Jeopardy Similar to TV finally Voice interaction is identical Answers taken from today’s show Competitive, quick feedback Feel smarter
  8. 8. Strategy - UCD / UX / DT Who, why, when, where, how? What is wanted and needed? What can and should you offer?
  9. 9. Strategy - Kano Model
  10. 10. Strategy - Martin, et. al. What are our aspirations and goals? Where will we choose to play? How will we choose to win? What capabilities are necessary?
  11. 11. Products that work so far Updates and messages Trivia, facts, quizzes, tasks Reminders, requests, lists, games Simple transactions Environment (lights, music, sleep)
  12. 12. These haven’t yet Detailed explanations Complex meaning Subtlety Sophisticated humor Conceptual conversation
  13. 13. “I really need to see you”
  14. 14. Goldilocks Story Rhythm Life lessons Feeling of language Iterating toward resolution Intersection and balance
  15. 15. Ginger Rogers “(Astaire) was able to do dances on screen that would have been impossible to risk if he hadn't had a partner like Ginger” Being better than expected
  16. 16. Backwards and in high heels Expectations and rules about content and meta-information are ingrained, subtle, and challenging Beyond choreography to anticipation, interpretation, response, and grace
  17. 17. Challenges Distraction and memory Context and delivery Naturalness, familiarity, predictability
  18. 18. Principles and guidelines WIIFM Useful, usable desirable Fresh and spontaneous Engaging Gricean Aesthetics, rhythm, melody, chunks
  19. 19. Customer POVs Transactional: What’s my goal? What’s required to make that happen? Informational: What do I want to know? What order and structure? Will I want more?
  20. 20. Customer POVs Entertaining: What delights me? What keeps me interested and coming back? Educational: What do I need to learn? What helps me? How do I know I’m learning the right things?
  21. 21. Good voice app products Clarity of purpose Non-trivial, uncommon benefit Comfortable interaction Consequential content Engaging emotion Gratification Differentiated from mobile and web Faster, easier, more enjoyable
  22. 22. Phillip Hunter @designoutloud Pulse Labs VP of Product Voice Application Product Strategy
  23. 23. Resources -The Media Equation: How People Treat Computers, Television, and New Media Like Real People and Places (Nass…) - Voice User Interface Design (Cohen…) - Designing Voice User Interfaces: Principles of Conversational Experiences (Pearl) - www.avixd.org - Gricean maxims: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/~haroldfs/ dravling/grice.html - Radio: http://training.npr.org/audio/writing-for-radio-a- manifesto-from-nprs-chris-joyce/ - Dialogue: https://thewritepractice.com/dialogue-powerful/

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