Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
     August 2011   Dear customers and friends,   The  Center  for  Automotive  Research  (CAR)  again  organized  and  spo...
    The Fulton Automotive Perspective…  Our belief is that what is driving the future success of all automakers is their a...
 The following are summaries from keynote address presentations at the 2011 ManagementBriefings sponsored by CAR, held Aug...
TOYOTA (Ray Tanguay, Sr. Vice President)Overcoming the challenges of the past few years…  Looking back at “triple‐witching...
FORD MOTOR (Jim Farley, Group Vice President, Global Sales & Marketing)Designing for Technology  Millennial customer marke...
TOYOTA (Paul Williamsen, National Manager, Lexus College)Future Mobility Trends  What will impact the future of personal m...
ONSTAR (Linda Marshall, President)Connectivity perspectives:        Merging and convergence of of telecommunication OEMs a...
PARKING CARMA (Rick Warner, CEO)Parking integration perspectives:        Mobile applications are available        Key MSAs...
CHRYSLER (Dan Knott, SVP of Purchasing & Supplier Quality)Discussion of guiding principles – supplier development   Cultur...
MCKINSEY & CO. (Hans-Werner Kaas)Surprising financial results         Auto suppliers as a segment have outperformed the S&...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

CAR Automotive Briefings 2011

314 views

Published on

Executive Summary of the CAR Industry Briefings this August.

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

CAR Automotive Briefings 2011

  1. 1.      August 2011   Dear customers and friends,   The  Center  for  Automotive  Research  (CAR)  again  organized  and  sponsored  its  annual Management Briefings in Traverse City during the first week of August.  The theme this year was “Prosperity Amid Uncertainty” and once again there was significant focus on the key global business issues facing the automotive industry today.  Keynote  speakers  included  Sergio  Marchionne,  CEO,  Chrysler  Group  LLC  &  Fiat;  Jim Farley,  Group  Vice  President,  Sales  &  Marketing,  Ford  Motor;  Mark  Reuss,  President North  America,  General  Motors;  Bob  King,  President,  UAW,  and  others.    Their summarized remarks are included in this brief.  Also  presented  here is the  Fulton  automotive  perspective  and  our  thoughts  about  the state of the industry.  We acknowledge the complexity of the business and the challenge of  the  current  economic  surroundings  facing  our  OEM  and  supplier  customers  today.  Please note our point of view and we welcome your comments and feedback.     Phil Biggs, Fulton Innovation phil.biggs@fultoninnovation.com                7575 Fulton Street East, Ada, MI 49355
  2. 2.     The Fulton Automotive Perspective…  Our belief is that what is driving the future success of all automakers is their ability to balance  the  complexity  of  the  North  American  market  as  it  splinters  into  two  main segments: the baby boomers, with their huge purchasing power and intense demand for content, safety, and infotainment, and the echo boomers, with their desire for constant mass customization inside the vehicle, their drive for connectivity, and their fickle tastes. This  market  splintering  continues  to  force  serious  proliferation  of  models  off  common architectures, constant retooling of content, and continued focus on a design business model over a low‐cost manufacturing model.     Fulton believes that worldwide alliances are the key to sustaining success as the industry continues  to  redefine  its  labor  relationships,  consolidate  its  distribution  network,  and rationalize its brand portfolios. Going forward, we believe the industry will continue to invest in advanced technologies to differentiate their offerings, pursue growth markets around  the  globe,  and  leverage  key  relationships  with  dealers,  suppliers,  and  labor.  New  organic  suppliers  will  emerge  –  in  the  previously  undeveloped  segments  such  as Electric  Vehicle  (EV),  Business‐to‐Grid  (B2G),  V2V  (Vehicle‐to‐vehicle) and  V2I  (Vehicle‐to‐infrastructure), and other alternative powertrain and EV ecosystem segments.  Among critical supplier issues is the need to optimize volume of vehicle content while containing build‐to‐operate costs as the pressure to innovate increases.  Availability and higher  costs  of  key  raw  materials  and  trying  to  create  down‐line  supply  chain  in emerging  markets  will  be  enormous  concerns  throughout  the  industry  during  the decade.  Determining location of new assembly plants, the status of tariff and non‐tariff policies  by  region,  and  matching  those  and  other  business  decisions  with  global technology investments will be vital.  Fulton  recognizes  that  linking  consumer  technology  demands  with  the  evolution  in personal mobility is already upon us – and the growth and adoption of wireless power will play a significant role in vehicle connectivity.  With Facebook, Nokia, and Bluetooth executives  taking  prominent  roles  at  automotive  conferences  like  MBS,  it  is  clear  that the  industry  truly  has  become  technology‐driven.    And,  as  in‐car  innovation  expands, Fulton hopes to create and commercialize the kinds of technology solutions that meet the  stringent  requirements  of  suppliers  and  manufacturers  as  well  as  the  aspirational needs of car buyers worldwide.       7575 Fulton Street East, Ada, MI 49355
  3. 3.  The following are summaries from keynote address presentations at the 2011 ManagementBriefings sponsored by CAR, held August 1 – 4 in Traverse City, MICHRYSLER (Sergio Marchionne, President & CEO)Keynote speech highlights:  “Ignore China at your own peril. They have grown tremendously and have some of  the most updated current technology.”  “There  will  be  a  Chrysler  after  me.”    Marchionne’s  successor  will  likely  be  drawn  from  the  22‐member  Group  Executive  Council  that  will  manage  Chrysler  and  Fiat  beginning September 1st.  “For multinational companies, it becomes almost impossible to find the right mix of  labor  representation  to  effectively  stand  in  for  the  labor  force  across  the  group.”  Marchionne is no supporter of labor unions having a board seat.  “The new 54.5 mpg Federal fuel economy standard for 2025 is very doable.”  “An IPO is not likely until after 2012, but it would allow the UAW retiree health care  fund to convert from Chrysler stock to cash.”  “Company boards have an obligation to maintain a level of equilibrium in pay levels  between executives and workers – the gap between executive and worker pay  causes indignation here in the U.S. and globally.” UAW (Bob King, President)Discussion of new partnerships with automaker companies  UAW is embracing culture change  Helping to innovate, rededicating to quality  Focus on environmental and CAFÉ standards Change in Washington is critical  “We must restore the American middle class…”  Anti‐union efforts are “immoral and socially irresponsible”  UAW has a vision of “global justice”  UAW is embracing collaboration and cooperation to achieve our core values  UAW has adopted co‐determination in its Principles of Fair Elections & Organization,  in its efforts to attract new member companies in the 21st century Foreign Initiatives  UAW looking at working with international labor groups to expand its membership  Globally, Chrysler is demonstrating higher productivity and better quality UAW Value Proposition  The ability for shop floor workers to speak openly about quality issues or business  processes as a “represented organization” sets the UAW apart from non‐union  workers  7575 Fulton Street East, Ada, MI 49355
  4. 4. TOYOTA (Ray Tanguay, Sr. Vice President)Overcoming the challenges of the past few years…  Looking back at “triple‐witching” natural and financial disasters  2008‐2010 Recession  Recurring recalls  Earthquake/Tsunami, March 2011  Lessons learned…  Improve decision‐making process from corporate to field  Communicate more openly, collaborate more globally  Strengthen risk management (regional alignment)  Enriching Lives around the World  $500 million of philanthropic support  $23 billion of investment in North America  2,000 more jobs added in Mississippi, 35,000 American jobs total  Connect to technology and Smart Grid via Entune  Entune enables voice‐activated technologies and cloud computing  Existing Vehicle Assessments / New Vehicle Launches  6 new hybrids to be introduced by 2012  Safety dominates – even ahead of quality and design  $50 million to safety institute at Tech Center in Ann Arbor  Re‐committed to quality and eco‐friendly solutions (zero landfill impact in Japan‐ based plants)  3 million Prius vehicles sold globally, 1 million in North America  Prius constitutes 50% of all hybrid vehicle sales NOKIA (Chris Weber, President)In‐Car Connectivity   The Mobile Society  NavTech maps (owned by Nokia)  GPS will be in all mobile devices by 2014  Nokia seeks to create seamless in‐car consumer technology experiences  Car Connectivity Consortium (including auto OEMs Hyundai, Toyota, VW, Daimler, GM,  Honda) as well as handset OEMs  Seamless Smartphone Integration available via USB, Bluetooth, WLAN Car‐Optimized Experience  Driver distraction controlled through technical protocols and specifications  Integration of key infotainment applications via touch screen interface  New business models and revenue streams will be created as this consumer queue  is developed  7575 Fulton Street East, Ada, MI 49355
  5. 5. FORD MOTOR (Jim Farley, Group Vice President, Global Sales & Marketing)Designing for Technology  Millennial customer market overview:  Link social media initiatives to branding efforts  Social media can provide entertaining methods to educate  Must demonstrate technological features in very brief time (15‐30 seconds)  Then, the discovery step provides the “essence of the brand”  Impact of societal change  Detroit is the epicenter of automotive design and R&D  We are witnessing the evolution of vehicle product as society changes rapidly  There is a wide chasm between the Baby Boomer/Gen X segment and the Millennial  segment, where content demands are vastly different at times and yet very similar   How can the auto industry inform its customers?  Dealer involvement i.e. Sync My Ride training sessions  Individual  transportation  solution  /  perpetual  subscription  /  contract  renewals  /  utility upgrades / other services  My Ford Touch one‐on‐one coaching sessions  Create a user community i.e. Apple users and the Apple Genius Bar GENERAL MOTORS (Mark Reuss, President)Customer experience is paramount…  Chevy Volt customers setting new customer experience standards  2011 Q2 – $2.35 billion in earnings  GM reports sales gains in top 5 global markets, up 16% gain overall  By 2012 40% of car‐buying public will be the Millennial segment (18 to 30)  GM has formed media partnership with Scratch (MTV)  $117 million investment in Oshawa plant for new Cadillac XTS  $190 million investment in Lansing plant for new C‐category ATS concept     7575 Fulton Street East, Ada, MI 49355
  6. 6. TOYOTA (Paul Williamsen, National Manager, Lexus College)Future Mobility Trends  What will impact the future of personal mobility?  Light rail options  Geographic distribution of jobs  Commutes are becoming more suburb‐to‐suburb versus suburb‐to‐city  Short‐medium‐long distance commuting needs require different vehicles  Extended‐range vehicles required for personal, non‐urban travel needs What are the challenges to rapid hybrid growth?  Extension of cruising range  Battery costs  Durability  Consistent high and low temperature performance  Develop retail hydrogen stations for re‐fueling @10,000 psi within two minutes  Southern California hydrogen station roll‐out 2011‐2012, continues until 2015 What’s next in the combined driving‐personal mobility experience?  Sync with transit schedules  Park & ride for mass transit  Carpool / Rideshare / Rental  App‐driven information available (Pandora, Bing, etc.) through via Smartphone  FACEBOOK (Doug Frisbie, Marketing Director)Social Design & Connecting the Vehicle  Social graphing and mapping to share ideas and experiences  Web is being built around people – browse / search / discover  Shift from what to who in regard to prioritizing applications  Social by design – build from the ground up / put people at the center / make it  scale and scalable  Make it simple to use, take out complexity, make connections easy to leverage Commercial adoption:  Gaming industry provides an excellent example of simple to use applications that  have complex and advanced graphics  Shared experience versus singular experience is the norm  Rapid scale can be achieved due to adaptable electronic functions     7575 Fulton Street East, Ada, MI 49355
  7. 7. ONSTAR (Linda Marshall, President)Connectivity perspectives:  Merging and convergence of of telecommunication OEMs and vehicle OEMs  1.1 billion smart phones by 2013  Product development cycles: automotive – 3.5 years / wireless communications – 18  months  130,000 customers using the RemoteLink application with 3.6 million interactions  MyLink (Chevy) / IntelliLink (Buick, Cadillac) / GMC Link  FamilyLink (9‐month pilot to test vehicle location, speed, directions, and safety)  OnStar FMV (For My Vehicle) to connect with 90 million Gm and non‐GM vehicles OnStar highlights:  Launched 1996, 15 years / 45 services / 4 brands / 50 models  380 million service interactions to‐date   Call center located in Warren, MI  Subscribers – over 6 million (U.S.) / 500,000 (China) COVISINT (David Miller, Chief Security Officer)Vehicle information security perspectives:  OEM now wishes to control the application delivered to the end‐user car buyer  How can unauthorized intrusion be prevented when inviting app users into the  vehicle information space?  Avoid provisioning complications   How will the industry invite third‐party content/app providers to write apps?  Securing vehicle app integration will be crucial, must secure platform network  Automatic de‐provisioning process will protect consumer in a crash situation  without violating HIPPA laws  To connect vehicle users, owners and vehicles – operating requirements i.e. radio  pre‐sets, interactive electronics all are stipulated in advance and access can be  limited or approved BLUETOOTH SIG (Mike Foley, Executive Director)Connectivity perspectives:  Special interest group (SIG) includes smartphones, tablets, auto (90% by 2016),  health and wellness  Growth jumped dramatically in 2006, as a demanded in‐vehicle feature  Transforming data into real‐time information – new developments: Key fob  enhancement, diagnostic tools and sensors i.e. drowsiness indicator or heartbeat  monitor, ignition status, seatbelt status, tire pressure status, mobile phone  applications, seat occupancy, other identification information from the “car hub”  Other interconnected “hubs” – smart home devices, health / wellness / sports /  fitness solutions, television hub and connectivity, vehicle (beyond hands‐free)  Automotive Bluetooth Ecosystem Team (BET): Ford, GM, Honda, RIM, Apple, Continental   7575 Fulton Street East, Ada, MI 49355
  8. 8. PARKING CARMA (Rick Warner, CEO)Parking integration perspectives:  Mobile applications are available  Key MSAs are Chicago, San Diego, NYC, Boston  Connected driver / parking benefits: convenience, security, needs‐based demand  Link incentives to parking network managers to identify supply by city  Wireless devices growing at 15+% per year  Opportunity to improve parking experience – pay more (such as Starbuck’s) for  better service  Key links to special events, gas station locations, public light rail transportation,  towing, parking facilities  Provide advertising and coupon interface for instant reservations, special discounts  Voice interactive smart parking service TOYOTA (Justin Ward, VP of Advanced Technology)Fuel Cell Vehicle (FCV) Development  Hydrogen fuel cells expected in U.S. market by 2015 with sedan type vehicles  Fuel cell sources: Natural gas reformation / waste water into hydrogen  Zero CO2 emissions  Higher (500 km) driving range, better start‐ups, broader feedstock options  Vehicle efficiency of 60%, overall efficiency of 36% including factors such as  charging, fueling, practical cruising range, system cost, etc.  Polymer electrolyte fuel cell structure includes catalyst, separator, stacking cells and  FC stack  FCV and hybrid system components include integrated: power control unit / motor /  battery  Performance metrics: 86 MPGe / top speed 95 MPH  Cold weather driving range – 431 miles  FC stack durability is an issue, need to eliminate the departure between  performance and cost, need to increase power density, and reduce platinum loads  (comparable to conventional vehicles) by increasing core shell technology  Total vehicle cost is high (vehicles are hand‐built), reduce costs via mass production,  overcoming technical challenges  In Japan, 100 FCV stations to be deployed (2015), 1000 stations (2025), 5000  stations (2030) / In U.S. 20 FCV stations in California (2013), 15 stations in New York  City (2015)  7575 Fulton Street East, Ada, MI 49355
  9. 9. CHRYSLER (Dan Knott, SVP of Purchasing & Supplier Quality)Discussion of guiding principles – supplier development   Culture change  Transparency & collaboration   Urgency & advocacy  Long‐term relationships Capacity management   Prepare for increased volumes  Can OEMs deliver new volumes accurately?  Collaborating on innovation  Ideas / supplier innovation team review / executive review / engineering innovation  team / adoption  Supplier retains IP or shared with OEM with OEM having access Cost management   Detailed quote processes will be routine  Supplier/OEM must be able to hedge raw materials costs  Supplier/OEM cost‐sharing in conjunction with annual productivity commitments Performance management   Warranty  Delivery  Partnerships including diversity and sustainability  Quality  Cost Chrysler commitment  $90 billion annual spend combined Chrysler‐Fiat  Currently very little to no product overlap  24 new models, 19 major product interventions planned  20‐quarter plan includes internal process improvement, meritocracy for selecting  supplier awards (not solely cost‐driven), better communication field to HDQ    Key Supplier Issues Where will assembly plants be located?  Status of tariff and non‐tariff policies in key markets            Recognition of industry as a technology‐based segment  Trying to create down‐line supply chain in emerging markets  Availability and higher costs of certain raw materials  Increased legislation and regulation in certain markets  North America sales growth will outpace Europe and Latin America, slower than  Asia‐Pacific  Need for flexible and sustainable vehicle and business platforms  Supplier consolidation will continue / pressure to innovate will increase  Sourcing process / RFQ feedback needs to improve  7575 Fulton Street East, Ada, MI 49355
  10. 10. MCKINSEY & CO. (Hans-Werner Kaas)Surprising financial results  Auto suppliers as a segment have outperformed the S&P 500 since 2006  Average cost of components/materials used in an average vehicle provided to OEM:  $13,400  50% of productivity give‐backs has been recaptured by suppliers via new product  content / new content of $1500 per vehicle as MSRP declined  4 industry mega‐trends  Cost volatility / materials costs remain uncertain  Vehicle content, regulatory impact as powertrain requirements shift  Competitive intensity  BRIC market growth  Survey findings  Price‐cost drivers: emissions / fuel economy / regulation / new content / safety  OEMs must match content design requirements with cost pressures  60% of supplier executives polled believe that the next decade will be “tougher.”  than the past decade (not pessimistic, just more challenging)  Selecting the right segments or OEM platforms will be the key strategic choice by  suppliers, those that are growing profitably  What’s Next?  Reduction in value delivery is more likely as we move to 2020 (more difficult to  create customer value ahead)  What to do?  Continued product innovation, smart consolidation, continued cost  improvement, explore adjacent (non‐automotive) industries, smart divesting  Achieving long‐term value creation requires addressing to 2 questions:  Where to play?    How to play?   Suppliers and OEMs must select the right mix of strategic / execution choices Advanced Propulsion TechnologiesCurrent and future market overview:  Influencers include: cost‐competitiveness / market demand / product solution  adoption glide path / choices and flexibility / % gains and efficiencies  Internal combustion (IC) technology will continue as range extender  Hydraulic and mechanical power management solutions will be integrated into the  hybrid segments  Diesel and clean diesel technology development is behind based on low market  demand in U.S., and higher total cost of ownership (TCO), longer payback equation  compared to improved gasoline pricing and clean gas accessibility  Customer utility (towing, commercial use, high torque) will continue in U.S. truck  markets  7575 Fulton Street East, Ada, MI 49355

×