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Technology Integration in Mathematics Instruction in Urban Public Schools

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An Examination of Factors that Impact Technology Integration in Urban Public Mathematics Classrooms

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Technology Integration in Mathematics Instruction in Urban Public Schools

  1. 1. An Examination of Factors that Impact Technology Integration in Urban Public Secondary Mathematic Classrooms Dr. Phyllis Harvey-Buschel March, 2009
  2. 2. PRESENTATION OUTLINE <ul><li>Methodology </li></ul><ul><li>Research Design </li></ul><ul><li>Methods of Data Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><li>Descriptive Summary </li></ul><ul><li>Correlations </li></ul><ul><li>Findings </li></ul><ul><li>Implications </li></ul><ul><li>Limitations </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Technology Integration </li></ul><ul><li>Background to Problem </li></ul><ul><li>Problem </li></ul><ul><li>Theoretical Framework </li></ul><ul><li>Significance of the Study </li></ul><ul><li>Foundation Studies </li></ul><ul><li>Research Questions </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>INTRODUCTION </li></ul>
  4. 4. Technology Integration <ul><li>The incorporation of technology resources and technology-based practices into the daily instructional routines and students activities in the classrooms. </li></ul><ul><li>Technology resources are computers and specialized software, network-based communication systems, and other equipment and infrastructure. </li></ul><ul><li>Practices include collaborative work and communication, Internet-based research, remote access to instrumentation, network-based transmission and retrieval of data, and other methods. </li></ul><ul><li>(USDE, 2005) </li></ul>
  5. 5. Background to Problem <ul><li>Limited research on use of technology by mathematics teachers in public urban secondary schools. </li></ul><ul><li>Limited research on the usefulness of teacher professional development for technology integration by mathematics teachers in urban public secondary schools. </li></ul><ul><li>The significance of the issue is how to provide professional development that will improve teachers' ability to incorporate technology as an effective instructional tool in mathematics. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Problem <ul><li>The problem explored in this study was whether access to technology had an impact on technology integration in mathematics instruction in urban public secondary schools. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Theoretical Framework
  8. 8. Significance of the Study <ul><li>Extend the limited research base on use of technology in mathematics instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide education leaders with useful information about professional development for technology integration in mathematics instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide policy makers with relevant information on technology access in mathematics classrooms in urban secondary schools. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Foundation Studies <ul><li>Hazzan, O. (2003). Prospective high school mathematics teachers’ attitudes toward integrating computers in their future teaching. Journal of Research on Technology in Education , 35 (2), 213-225. </li></ul><ul><li>Barron, A. E., Kemker, K., Harmes, C., & Kalaydjian, K. (2003). Large-Scale research study on technology in K-12 school: Technology integration as it relates to the national technology standards. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 35 (4), 489-508. </li></ul><ul><li>Norris, C., Sullivan, T., Poirot, J., & Soloway, E. (2003). No access, no use, no impact: Snapshot survey of educational technology in K-12. Journal of Research on Technology in Education , 36 (1), 15-27. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Research Questions <ul><li>Q1: How does teacher experience, professional development and availability of computers impact technology use in mathematics instruction in urban public secondary schools? </li></ul><ul><li>Q2: How does use of technology in instruction differ among teachers in urban public secondary mathematics classrooms? </li></ul><ul><li>Q3: How does technology integration in mathematics instruction differ among teachers who participate in professional development and teachers who do not? </li></ul><ul><li>Q4: Does access to technology influence instructional activities in mathematics in urban public secondary classrooms? </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>METHODOLOGY </li></ul>
  12. 12. Research Design and Population <ul><li>Research Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A Quantitative, non-experimental, causal-comparative design. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NCES Currently available public use data from Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instrument: Public School Teacher Questionnaire, (using 5 items in 2 sections) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Target Population </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Urban Public Secondary Mathematics Teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>3654 teachers </li></ul></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Methods of Data Analysis <ul><li>Descriptive Statistics - Frequencies and Percentages </li></ul><ul><li>Correlation -To determine whether relationships existed among the variables. </li></ul><ul><li>Kruskal-Wallis One-way ANOVA (KW) - To determine if there were differences between access and technology integration in mathematics instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>Mann Whitney U-test - Used as Post-Hoc test of significance </li></ul><ul><li>Alpha level of 0.05 was used for statistical significance. </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>RESULTS </li></ul>
  15. 15. Descriptive Analysis Summary <ul><li>Variable Percentages </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher Experience Novice Veterans </li></ul><ul><li>20 56 </li></ul><ul><li>No Use of computers for Instruction 17.8 19.1 </li></ul><ul><li>No Use of computers for Problem Solving 30.8 26.4 </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Development Participated Did Not Participate </li></ul><ul><li>67 33 </li></ul><ul><li>No Use of computers for Instruction 17.5 26 </li></ul><ul><li>No Use of computers for Problem Solving 26 34 </li></ul><ul><li>Availability of computers Yes No (0 or 1) </li></ul><ul><li>64 36 </li></ul>
  16. 16. Spearman rho Correlations for Access to Computers and Integration in Instruction <ul><li>Variables r-coefficients </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher Experience </li></ul><ul><li>Computers in the classroom .026 </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Development -.085 </li></ul><ul><li>Subject Matter .025 </li></ul><ul><li>Problem Solving .056 </li></ul><ul><li>Computers in the Classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Development .012 </li></ul><ul><li>Subject Matter .206 </li></ul><ul><li>Problem Solving .119 </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Development </li></ul><ul><li>Subject Matter -.074 </li></ul><ul><li>Problem Solving -.077 </li></ul><ul><li>Subject Matter </li></ul><ul><li>Problem Solving . 54* </li></ul><ul><li>Adjusted R 2 .29 </li></ul>
  17. 17. Teacher Experience
  18. 18. Professional Development
  19. 19. Access to Computers
  20. 20. Findings <ul><li>Years of teaching experience did not impact use of technology in mathematics instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers who received professional development in technology were more likely to use technology in instruction and for higher order thinking activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Technology access in mathematics classrooms resulted in higher frequency of use for instruction and for higher order thinking activities. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Implications for Urban School Districts <ul><li>Sc hool districts should require that teacher preparation programs train teachers to use technology in their teaching. </li></ul><ul><li>Instructional leaders should be required to have training and ongoing professional development for use of technology in instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>Practitioners should develop multiple strategies for the integration of technology for higher order thinking activities in mathematics instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>School districts should allocate budgetary resources for teachers professional development in technology use in instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>School districts should allocate adequate financial resources each school year to ensure that schools have access to trained technology coaches who can assist teachers in the classroom use. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Conclusion <ul><li>For urban public schools to have effective technology integration they need to develop appropriate plans for technology use. In mathematics, technology use must be aligned with the goals and objectives of the mathematics curriculum. </li></ul><ul><li>Providing access to technology is important for integration in instruction. Schools must have the resources to provide mathematics teachers with the computers but most importantly they need professional development to be able to use technology effectively in instruction. Effectiveness of technology cannot be determined if access is limited. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Recommendations for Action <ul><li>Focus on the type of professional development that promotes technology use to achieve curricula goals. </li></ul><ul><li>Professional development for technology integration should include a qualitative component that monitors subject matter integration rather than frequency and intensity of use in instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on training teachers who are digital natives to mentor other teachers. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure that teacher planning time is used more efficiently by creating and incorporating time for technology integration. </li></ul><ul><li>Hire professionals who are trained and competent in technology use as librarian/media specialist and as school technology coordinator. </li></ul>
  24. 24. <ul><li>Thank You </li></ul><ul><li>Questions or Comments </li></ul>

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