The Five PreceptsInstructor:Ven. Dr. Giác HạnhGĐPT Chánh HòaSunday, February 12, 2012
• Namo tassa bhagavato arahato  sammā sabuddhasssa• Veneration to the Exalted One, the  One worthy of special veneration, ...
The Five Precepts•   I. Pāṅātipātā veramaṅī sikkhapadaṁ samādiyāmi.•   (I abstain from killing any living beings.)•   II. ...
I. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Killing Sentient Beings• Once upon a time a housewife went to the market  to buy ...
I. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Killing Sentient Beings
I. The consequences ofKilling Sentient Beings• Whoever kills any living being will be reborn in one of the  four lower abo...
I. The consequences ofKilling Sentient Beings(cont‟d)•   Being easily frightened when confronted with danger,•   Being kil...
II. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Stealing Other‟s Properties• Once upon a time, four women in Rājagaha  amassed r...
II. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Stealing Other‟s Properties
II. The consequences ofStealing• Stealing includes taking other‟s things without asking for the  permission of the owner, ...
II. The consequences ofStealing(cont‟d)• Having unstable and easily perishable/decayable fortune,• Having properties destr...
III. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Committing Adultery• Ānanda, the younger brother of Gotama Buddha,  fulfilled t...
III. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Committing Adultery• In the next existence he regained the  human life but was ...
III. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Committing Adultery
III. The consequences ofSexual Misconduct• Whoever has sexual relation with any person other than  one‟s spouse is said to...
III. The consequences ofSexual Misconduct (cont‟d)•   Being reborn as a sexual pervert (người hư hỏng),•   Being reborn in...
IV. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Falsehood• In the time of Kassapa Buddha, in Kimila, there  lived a male lay-dev...
IV. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Falsehood• The drunkard who lost the bet informed the leader  of the lay-devotee...
IV. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Falsehood• When they died, they all became miserable  beings near the lake Kanna...
IV. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Falsehood• Her five hundred companions also became her  servants as they had swo...
IV. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Falsehood
IV. The Consequencesof Telling Lies• Telling what is not true by gesture or words with malicious  intention is committing ...
IV. The Consequences ofTelling Lies (cont‟d)•   Defective appearance•   Lack of influence on others•   Harshness of speech...
V. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Indulging in Intoxicants• Once the Boddhisatta was born in a  wealthy family poss...
V. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Indulging in Intoxicants• His son squandered the wealth left behind by him  indul...
V. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Indulging in Intoxicants
V. The Consequences ofIndulging in Intoxicants• Intoxicants and narcotic drugs such as alcoholic, liquors,  opium, cocaine...
V. The Consequences ofIndulging in Intoxicants (cont‟d)•   Being ungrateful,•   Lack of moral shame and moral dread,•   In...
Conclusion
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The Five Precepts

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The Five Precepts slideshow that the Ven. Dr. Giac Hanh presented to the Chanh Hoa Buddhist Youth's Dhamma Class at the Compassion Meditation Center on February 12, 2012.

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The Five Precepts

  1. 1. The Five PreceptsInstructor:Ven. Dr. Giác HạnhGĐPT Chánh HòaSunday, February 12, 2012
  2. 2. • Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā sabuddhasssa• Veneration to the Exalted One, the One worthy of special veneration, and the perfectly self-enlightened One• Nam Mô Bổn Sư Thích Ca Mâu Ni Phật
  3. 3. The Five Precepts• I. Pāṅātipātā veramaṅī sikkhapadaṁ samādiyāmi.• (I abstain from killing any living beings.)• II. Adinnādānā veramaṅī sikkhapadaṁ samādiyāmi.• (I abstain from taking what is not given.)• III. Kāmesu micchācārā veramaṅī sikkhapadaṁ samādiyāmi.• (I abstain from sexual misconduct.)• IV. Musāvādā veramaṅī sikkhapadaṁ samādiyāmi.• (I abstain from saying what is not true.)• V. Surā-meraya-majja-pamādaṭṭhānā veramaṅī sikkhapadaṁ samādiyāmi.• (I abstain from taking in drinks and drugs that are intoxicating and cause forgetfulness.)
  4. 4. I. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Killing Sentient Beings• Once upon a time a housewife went to the market to buy meat in order to feast a special guest. As she could not get meat from any place, she killed a little sheep which was bred in her house. The guest and her husband were very satisfied with the meat. But when she died she was cast into hell where she had to suffer for a long time. After that she was born as an animal as many times as the number of hair on the little sheep she had killed. In every animal life she was killed being cut at the throat as she had killed the little sheep.
  5. 5. I. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Killing Sentient Beings
  6. 6. I. The consequences ofKilling Sentient Beings• Whoever kills any living being will be reborn in one of the four lower abodes. Even when he is freed from there and is again reborn as a man, he will encounter following evil consequences:• Having physical deformities and disfiguments (tật xấu xí gớm guốc của cơ thể)• Being ugly• Being pale and feeble• Being dull and inactive• Being easily frightened
  7. 7. I. The consequences ofKilling Sentient Beings(cont‟d)• Being easily frightened when confronted with danger,• Being killed by other or facing death in young,• Suffering from many diseases,• Having few friends, and• Being separated from beloved ones.• On the other hand the one who abstains from killing sentient beings(sinh vật hay con người có tri giác) will enjoy the benefits which are the opposite of the above consequences.
  8. 8. II. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Stealing Other‟s Properties• Once upon a time, four women in Rājagaha amassed riches through malpractice of shortchanging and adulteration in selling their goods. They died in their prime life and became petas, miserable beings, outside the city. At night they entered the city looking for scattered food remnant or saliva or phlegm spat out by human beings. As they went along one street after another they came to their former houses and saw their husbands enjoying with the new wives. They felt so painful that they cried out, „we have been suffering miserably for having amassed wealth unlawfully while our husbands are enjoying to their heart‟s content with their new wives.”
  9. 9. II. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Stealing Other‟s Properties
  10. 10. II. The consequences ofStealing• Stealing includes taking other‟s things without asking for the permission of the owner, and taking other‟s properties by force or by cheating or by trick/deception. Whoever commits stealing will be reborn in one of the four lower abode. Even when as a man, he will encounter the following consequences:• Being poor• Having to bodily and mental suffering• Being tortured by hunger and starvation• Having unfulfilled wishes
  11. 11. II. The consequences ofStealing(cont‟d)• Having unstable and easily perishable/decayable fortune,• Having properties destroyed by the five enemies, namely flood, fire, thieves, bad inheritors and bad rulers.• On the other hand the one who abstains from stealing will enjoy the benefits which are the opposite of the above consequences/aftermath, effect, outcome, result, result, event, issue, upshot.
  12. 12. III. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Committing Adultery• Ānanda, the younger brother of Gotama Buddha, fulfilled the ten perfections for a hundred thousand worlds. In one of his lives in this world, he became a rich goldsmith‟s son. In this life he associated with bad companions and committed adultery several times.• When he died he was cast into Roruva Hell where he was tortured for many years. After that he was born as a monkey who had its genital bitten off as soon as it was born. After that life, he was born as a goat and then as a calf which were castrated when grew up.
  13. 13. III. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Committing Adultery• In the next existence he regained the human life but was born as a sexual pervert. After that he attained celestial existences as female deities for five lives with the support of wholesome kamma, but he did not attain malehood because of the unwholesome kamma of committing adultery. Then he was born as Princess Rucā in the human realm. Only after that, he regained manhood.
  14. 14. III. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Committing Adultery
  15. 15. III. The consequences ofSexual Misconduct• Whoever has sexual relation with any person other than one‟s spouse is said to have committed sexual misconduct. That person will be reborn in one of lower abodes when he dies. Even when as a man, he will encounter following consequences:• Being disgusted/revolt by others• Having many enemies,• Lacking of wealth and prosperity,• Being deprived/impoverish of happiness• Being reborn as a woman,
  16. 16. III. The consequences ofSexual Misconduct (cont‟d)• Being reborn as a sexual pervert (người hư hỏng),• Being reborn in the inferior lineage,• Encountering disgrace,• Having physical deformities,• Being separated from beloved ones,• Being inflicted (bắt chịu phải mất) with the loss of wealth.• On the other hand the one who abstains from sexual misconduct will enjoy the benefits which are the opposite of the above consequences
  17. 17. IV. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Falsehood• In the time of Kassapa Buddha, in Kimila, there lived a male lay-devotee who was a Stream- winner. He did the meritorious deeds of planting trees, building bridges and monasteries, etc., with his five hundred followers who were of the same view. This group of lay devotees went to the Buddha‟s monastery frequently to listen to the Dhamma. Their wives also went to the monastery occasionally to listen to the Dhamma and to make offerings.
  18. 18. IV. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Falsehood• The drunkard who lost the bet informed the leader of the lay-devotees about the matter. And the latter asked his wife whether she has committed adultery. She lied that what he has heard was not true. As her husband did not believe her, she pointed to a black dog nearby and whose ears were cut off and swore: “If I have committed adultery with another man, may I be eaten by this black dog in the next life.” Still, her husband did not believe her and he inquired her companions. Although her companions knew the truth, they also swore: “We do not know. If this is not true, may we become her slaves.”
  19. 19. IV. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Falsehood• When they died, they all became miserable beings near the lake Kannamunda in the Himavanta Forest. Because of their meritorious deeds in their past lives, they enjoyed the celestial luxury in a very grand golden mansion in the day time. But at night the leader of the group, in accordance with her swearing to her Stream- winner husband, she was eaten by a black dog.
  20. 20. IV. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Falsehood• Her five hundred companions also became her servants as they had sworn in lie in their past lives. Moreover, although they could enjoy the luxury of devas they did not get married. They felt lonely and boring for being apart from men.• Falsehood is greatest demeritorious deed while truthfulness is the most beneficial meritorious deeds.
  21. 21. IV. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Falsehood
  22. 22. IV. The Consequencesof Telling Lies• Telling what is not true by gesture or words with malicious intention is committing the action of falsehood. The gravity of that offence corresponds to the amount of harm done on others. The liar will have to suffer in the miserable realms after his death. If he was to be reborn in the human world he will be afflicted with the following defects (khuyết điểm):• Poor pronunciation• Uneven teeth• Foul breath• Unhealthy complexion• Poor eyesight and poor hearing
  23. 23. IV. The Consequences ofTelling Lies (cont‟d)• Defective appearance• Lack of influence on others• Harshness of speech, and• Restlessness of the mind.• On the other hand the one who abstains from telling lies will enjoy the benefits which are the opposite of the above consequences.
  24. 24. V. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Indulging in Intoxicants• Once the Boddhisatta was born in a wealthy family possessing eighty crores of silver coins. He performed the meritorious deeds of giving charity and keeping good morality. When he died, he was reborn as Sakka, the king of devas, in Tavatimsa.
  25. 25. V. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Indulging in Intoxicants• His son squandered the wealth left behind by him indulging in intoxicants. When the son had used up the forty crores of silver coins, he dug up the forty crores buried under ground. He built a liquor house and led an easy life associating with drunkards and indulging in intoxicants. When he was drunk, he let acrobats and dancers entertain them and presented one thousand silver coins to each.• Soon he had spent all the money and was reduced to a poor beggar. Finally he died miserably.
  26. 26. V. Story Illustrating the Consequencesof Indulging in Intoxicants
  27. 27. V. The Consequences ofIndulging in Intoxicants• Intoxicants and narcotic drugs such as alcoholic, liquors, opium, cocaine and heroin are addictive. Consuming any of these leads to drunkenness, forgetfulness and lack of common sense. These in turn lead to murder, lying and adultery, etc. Moreover, the user of intoxicants or narcotic drugs will enjoy poor health, die young and will be reborn in woeful abodes. Even when he is free from there and is again reborn as a human being, he will encounter the following evil consequences:• Lack of intelligent• Being lazy• Lack of mindfulness
  28. 28. V. The Consequences ofIndulging in Intoxicants (cont‟d)• Being ungrateful,• Lack of moral shame and moral dread,• Insanity, and• Tendency to commit all evil deeds.• On the other hand he who abstains from consuming intoxicants will enjoy the benefits which are the opposite of the above evil consequences.
  29. 29. Conclusion

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