Juma Ventures empowers youth to make successful transitions to independence in
  adulthood through an innovative program t...
Value Proposition

 We challenge the norm of persistent education and economic failure in
 low-income communities by deliv...
Juma Ventures - Stadium Concessions


A business partner:
   •   Juma Ventures operates as a traditional subcontractor at ...
What & Where We Operate
 Stadiums                    Cart Operations                               Vending Operations
    ...
Enterprise Corporate Partners

Product Relationships   Concession Relationships
Current Concession Business
On average, what does a Juma youth
make per game?



 Cart Employees                         V...
Stadium Concessions
Revenue History


                         1800                                                       ...
Financial Impact

2008 Juma Net Sales:                                                                            $1,445,2...
Revenue Creation
Since 1994:
2,500 jobs created
$9,000,000-income generated by business
$1,416,161-youth wages earned

Sus...
Learning and Challenges

Business Model Dynamics – Juma has limited strategic influence
Team/Ownership’s Role
    Selects ...
Learning and Challenges

Business Model Dynamics – Attendance: 100% out of Juma’s control

Core Attendance Matters
     Te...
2009-2010 Enterprise Plan:
Executive Summary



   •   Continue to grow the top and bottom line of the enterprise
   •   E...
College & Career Services
Juma offers programs that provide youth with exposure to college and
career options. We take you...
Positive Relationships
 Juma delivers services to youth in a case-management structure, where each youth
 develops a stron...
Financial Services
Juma launched the US’s first Individual Development Account (IDA) program
for youth in 1999. Juma provi...
Finance and Funding

In 2009, our goal is to raise $3,878,300 from philanthropic sources. Of this amount, $3,106,137 is ex...
To expand upon Juma’s successes
in the Bay Area California and
maximize impact with youth and
in our field, we are current...
Social Ventures for Youth Development
Social Ventures for Youth Development
Social Ventures for Youth Development
Social Ventures for Youth Development
Social Ventures for Youth Development
Social Ventures for Youth Development
Social Ventures for Youth Development
Social Ventures for Youth Development
Social Ventures for Youth Development
Social Ventures for Youth Development
Social Ventures for Youth Development
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Social Ventures for Youth Development

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Marc Spencer, CEO, Juma Ventures
Lecture 18Feb2010
Center For Socially Responsible Business
Lokey Graduate School of Business, Mills College

View the video: http://vimeo.com/10043808

Published in: Business, Economy & Finance
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Social Ventures for Youth Development

  1. 1. Juma Ventures empowers youth to make successful transitions to independence in adulthood through an innovative program that integrates employment in social enterprises and essential support services to prepare youth for success in pursuing higher education. Juma’s mission is to break the cycle of poverty by ensuring that young people complete a four-year college education.
  2. 2. Value Proposition We challenge the norm of persistent education and economic failure in low-income communities by delivering a unique and innovative three-pronged comprehensive program that offers employment in social enterprises we own and operate, financial education and asset building, and a college access and attainment pipeline. Investment in the education of low-income young people reverses the trend of urban gentrification and decay as these individuals return to their neighborhoods with college degrees, employment, and the economic means to purchase homes, pay taxes, and raise a family not living in poverty.
  3. 3. Juma Ventures - Stadium Concessions A business partner: • Juma Ventures operates as a traditional subcontractor at professional and college stadiums, under the direction of the master concessionaire. • Juma has established long-term, profitable relationships with Aramark, Levy Restaurants, Centerplate, and Sodexho over the past 15 years. A non-profit social enterprise: • Juma operates concessions with a double bottom-line objective. a. To achieve profitability while providing professional services. b. To provide job experience and life training to disadvantaged youth, who are working towards college acceptance and graduation.
  4. 4. What & Where We Operate Stadiums Cart Operations Vending Operations Coffee Ice Cream Nuts Ice Cream Coffee Ice Tea Nuts Soda Water 4 locations    4 locations  3 locations  AT&T Park (Centerplate) (Tully’s) (Dreyer’s) (Emerald) yes   yes   yes yes 1 location   4 locations  Monster Park (Centerplate)(Starbucks) (Dreyer’s) yes   yes   yes McAfee Coliseum  (Aramark) yes yes   yes 1 location  1 locations  Oracle Arena (Levy) (Starbucks) (Dreyer’s) CAL Memorial Stadium  yes   yes  yes  yes  (Sodexho) (Dreyer’s) (Stadium) (Coke) (Dasani) Qualcomm (Centerplate) Dreyer’s Store & 12 push carts yes yes yes Yes  Yes  Infineon Raceway (Levy) (Dreyer’s) (Cocoa) (Coke) (Dasani)
  5. 5. Enterprise Corporate Partners Product Relationships Concession Relationships
  6. 6. Current Concession Business On average, what does a Juma youth make per game? Cart Employees Vendors • Earn $9.40/hour • Earn > of 10% of sales or • Daily bonuses $9.40/hour • Scheduled 27 games on average • Daily/seasonal bonuses • 2009 average cart employee made • Scheduled 27 games on $1,531.78 and worked an average average of 5.9 hours/shift • 2009 average vendor made $1,430.41 and worked an average of 4.0 hours/shift
  7. 7. Stadium Concessions Revenue History 1800 250 1600 200 Revenue (in thousands) 200 1400 Number of Youth Jobs 180 1200 150 1000 132 131 125 128 128 1,571 800 91 100 1,309 85 600 65 870 400 757 728 725 718 703 44 50 679 34 25 28 406 200 356 260 175 155 0 0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
  8. 8. Financial Impact 2008 Juma Net Sales: $1,445,285 Juma manages all general business costs: COGS: 256,806 Youth & Staff Labor (training, payroll, management, fring: 647,561 Insurance & Other Operating: 142,788 2008 Fees Paid by Juma to Concessionaire: $508,346* Total Juma Expenses: 1,555,501 Profit/Loss: (110,216) Concessionaire costs: Provide adequate secure space for hawking operations and storage of product/supplies Addition of Juma operations into event cash bank distribution and collection, plus laundry service. *Sales split determined with each concessionaire contract, 2008 average concession fee of 32% per all combine accounts.
  9. 9. Revenue Creation Since 1994: 2,500 jobs created $9,000,000-income generated by business $1,416,161-youth wages earned Sustainability: $1,300,000-income generated in 2008 Scale: 2-social enterprises under management in 2006 8-social enterprises under management in 2008
  10. 10. Learning and Challenges Business Model Dynamics – Juma has limited strategic influence Team/Ownership’s Role Selects and approves all corporate sponsors, including food items Hires Master Concessionaire to operate all in-stadium food service and merchandising Receives a significant percentage of all food and merchandising sales Master Concessionaire’s Role Based on a sponsor’s contract with the team - make sure the terms are met Concessionaire selects and approves sub-contractors, like Juma – one-year contracts Juma is then hired based on the Concessionaire's specific operational needs Master concessionaire sets subcontractors financial rates Sub-contractor, including Juma, pays Master Concessionaire 30%+ of its gross sales
  11. 11. Learning and Challenges Business Model Dynamics – Attendance: 100% out of Juma’s control Core Attendance Matters Team’s Competitive Ranking (division winner or loser) Weather Implications On game day, presents a 20% delta in either direction Juma sells niche, specialty items only Special Events – drives attendance All-Star Games (one time events) Premium teams (Yankees, Boston Red Sox)
  12. 12. 2009-2010 Enterprise Plan: Executive Summary • Continue to grow the top and bottom line of the enterprise • Expand to two (2) new locations • West Coast-San Diego Padres, LA Market or Arizona • Formalize existing concession relationships • Develop new corporate partners • Formal relationships with sport team owners
  13. 13. College & Career Services Juma offers programs that provide youth with exposure to college and career options. We take youth on college tours on campuses throughout California and on career tours with major Bay Area employers. Throughout their participation we offer after–school tutoring, academic advising, and skills for success workshops. During their senior year, we provide assistance with college applications, scholarships, financial aid, and support youth in the transition from high school to postsecondary education and career paths as they enter adulthood. In recent years, more than 90% of Juma’s youth graduates have successfully transitioned to college. Most Juma youth participants have been the 1st in their families to attend college.
  14. 14. Positive Relationships Juma delivers services to youth in a case-management structure, where each youth develops a strong relationship with a member of Juma’s staff. Juma’s Individual Development Managers perform individualized needs assessments and work with each youth to create an Individual Development Plan that sets future goals and breaks down the steps to achieving them. Each of these staff members is a Masters-level professional. The relationships and bonds that form between youth participants and Juma’s staff are lifeblood of Juma’s program the glue that brings all of Juma’s services together. Often, the Juma staff are among the only adults in these young people’s lives that help to raise their expectations about their abilities and encourage themto strive to reach their full potential.
  15. 15. Financial Services Juma launched the US’s first Individual Development Account (IDA) program for youth in 1999. Juma provides savings accounts for youth to invest toward college and other future goals, complements these accounts with financial education that helps youth develop money management skills, and then matches the youth’s savings when their funds are used for college expenses, starting a small business, and homeownership. At present, Juma’s youth participants have opened more than 1,000 IDA and other bank accounts, have saved more than $650,000 of their earnings toward future plans, and have accessed more than $840,000 in matching funds toward asset purchases. 70% of these funds have been used for postsecondary education, 25% for micro-enterprise, and 5% for homeownership.
  16. 16. Finance and Funding In 2009, our goal is to raise $3,878,300 from philanthropic sources. Of this amount, $3,106,137 is expected to be allocated to the 2009 operating budget, with an additional $772,163 to be secured against the 2010 budget. This plan projects that revenues will come from the following sources: Source % of total 2009 Goal Foundation Grants 68% $2,647,813 Corporate Grants 11% $430,000 (Includes event sponsorships) Public Grants 12% $447,223 Individual Donations 6% $219,264 (Includes events) IDA Match Funds 2% $60,000 “Other” Revenue 2% $74,000 Sources* Total 100% $3,878,300
  17. 17. To expand upon Juma’s successes in the Bay Area California and maximize impact with youth and in our field, we are currently developing plans to replicate our stadium concession venture nationally, at major sports stadiums and venues across the US. We plan intend to expand the Field Of Dreams Initiative to provide opportunities to youth in stadiums and cities across America.

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