It’s a Bottoms-Up World;  Deal With It Paul Gillin Author,  The New Influencers  and  Secrets of Social Media Marketing
 
The New Journalism
Tale of the Tape <ul><li>Decline in circulation of top 10 newspapers in 2008: 635,000  </li></ul><ul><li>Average age of da...
Internet Eclipses Newspapers As Preferred News Source Source: Gallup (Dec., 08)
The Traditional Model
Information Democratization
We, the Media
Just One Guy Technorati rank: 714 Technorati fans: 146 Google Indexed pages: 3,760 Alex ranking: Top .17% Inbound links: 1...
How We Share Influence PRE MEDIA AGE MASS MEDIA AGE SOCIAL MEDIA AGE Consult a professional Readers letters Phone in; TV /...
Influence Inversion Courtesy Digitas
The New Newspaper?
The New Media Structure BLOGGERS ADVERTISERS PUBLISHERS MEDIA BLOGGERS EDITORS JOURNALISTS CONSUMERS
Community as Content By contributing to the body of knowledge, members gain insights they couldn’t learn from experts alon...
The Future Is About… <ul><li>Small markets </li></ul><ul><li>Aggregation </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Com...
Thank you! Paul Gillin 508-202-9807 [email_address] .com www.gillin.com Twitter: pgillin On Amazon or NewInfluencers.com  ...
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It's a Bottoms-Up World; Deal With It

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Traditional marketing has been all about delivering a message for the top and spreading it through as many channels as possible. That worked well in an age when mass media dominated the communications landscape, but the world has changed. Today, messages began at the bottom and percolate up. The mass media relies on tips and insights from bloggers to determine its priorities. An advertising campaign is no longer considered successful until the intended audience gives it their blessing. Informal networks of customers band together to tell businesses what they want.
This new dynamic is enormously powerful if you accept its value and permit it to guide your strategy. It's enormously threatening if you deny the voice of the newly empowered customer and insist on shouting messages they no longer want to hear. This presentation offers examples of the influence of the newly empowered customer and provides marketers with guidelines for listening and adapting to a market in which customers now have the ability - and the will - to speak.

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  • It's a Bottoms-Up World; Deal With It

    1. 1. It’s a Bottoms-Up World; Deal With It Paul Gillin Author, The New Influencers and Secrets of Social Media Marketing
    2. 3. The New Journalism
    3. 4. Tale of the Tape <ul><li>Decline in circulation of top 10 newspapers in 2008: 635,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Average age of daily newspaper reader in US: 57 </li></ul><ul><li>Reduction in US newsroom staffs since 2001: 25% </li></ul><ul><li>Magazine newsstand sales growth, US, 2008: -12% </li></ul><ul><li>In 2009: -22% </li></ul><ul><li>Growth in NBC prime time audience, 2008: -14.3% </li></ul><ul><li>Age of average network evening news viewer: 63 </li></ul><ul><li>Percent of time teenagers spend with television, compared to their parents: 60 </li></ul><ul><li>Percent they spend online: 600 </li></ul><ul><li>Growth in Twitter membership, 2/08 - 2/09: 1,400% </li></ul>Percent of Americans who say Daily Show and Colbert Report are replacing traditional news outlets: 33
    4. 5. Internet Eclipses Newspapers As Preferred News Source Source: Gallup (Dec., 08)
    5. 6. The Traditional Model
    6. 7. Information Democratization
    7. 8. We, the Media
    8. 9. Just One Guy Technorati rank: 714 Technorati fans: 146 Google Indexed pages: 3,760 Alex ranking: Top .17% Inbound links: 10,542 Del.icio.us bookmarks: 2,068 New York Times citations: 136 Computerworld citations: 193 InformationWeek citations: 72 Newsletter subscribers: 130,000
    9. 10. How We Share Influence PRE MEDIA AGE MASS MEDIA AGE SOCIAL MEDIA AGE Consult a professional Readers letters Phone in; TV / Radio Talk to shop worker Personal blog Social network page Widgets Photo sharing site Chat rooms Message boards Video sharing site Comments on blogs Comments on websites Viral emails Wish lists Ratings on retail sites Reviews on retail sites Auction websites Social Bookmarking Chat room Price comparison sites Social shopping sites Talk face to face Consult a professional Readers Letters Phone in; TV / Radio Talk to shop worker Phone call Talk face to face Phone call SMS Email Instant Messenger Talk face to face Talk to shop worker Consumer influence channels Source: Universal McCann Erickson
    10. 11. Influence Inversion Courtesy Digitas
    11. 12. The New Newspaper?
    12. 13. The New Media Structure BLOGGERS ADVERTISERS PUBLISHERS MEDIA BLOGGERS EDITORS JOURNALISTS CONSUMERS
    13. 14. Community as Content By contributing to the body of knowledge, members gain insights they couldn’t learn from experts alone Personal finance Travel planning Local services Language education Travel planning How-to video
    14. 15. The Future Is About… <ul><li>Small markets </li></ul><ul><li>Aggregation </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Community </li></ul><ul><li>Conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Speed </li></ul><ul><li>Flexibility </li></ul><ul><li>Experimentation </li></ul>The Long Tail applies to information, too
    15. 16. Thank you! Paul Gillin 508-202-9807 [email_address] .com www.gillin.com Twitter: pgillin On Amazon or NewInfluencers.com On Amazon or SSMMBook.com

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