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ALL ABOUT BIOLOGY IN THE 3BIMESTER.BY: PEDRO JOSÉ GARCÍA ROMERO.GRADE: 7.B.IDENTIFYING PHYSICAL & CHEMICAL CHANGES, PROPER...
Coin Measurement Activity Applying the Density to Proof its Real or FalsePhysical and Chemical Analysis Using Three Differ...
Physical changes are changes affecting the form of a chemical substance, but do not change thechemical composition of that...
2. Materials and ReactiveMaterials:a) Lab Coatb) Google’sc) Glovesd) CoinsReactive:a) Acid (Hydrogen Sulfide)b) Base (Sodi...
3. ProcedureObservations:As said, in these activities we are proving if a coin is real or false thanks to density and howi...
f. You can use the Close-up button on the left at any time to see how the coinlooked before cleaning. Use the Close-up but...
4. Observations and ResultsI. Physical science lab stage 1a. In the first coin the coin (A) the mass was (26.7g) then the ...
5. ConclusionsI. The coin a (100 pesos) = before de HN3=3.3 g. After= 2.5g. So the coin low 0.8g.II. The coin b (200 pesos...
6. Appendix#Note: These photos have been taken using the camera on the cellphones of Juan FelipeGarcia and Daniel Ospina M...
II. 3.III. Stage 2.
IV. 5.V. 6.
VI. 7.VII. 8.
VIII.Test tubes.
IX.Mixing zinc with nitric acid.
X.Mixing zinc with sodium hydroxide.XI.Mixing zinc with nitric acid and sodium hydroxide.
XII.Mixing zinc with hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide and nitric acid.XIII.Cooper sulfate
XIV.Mixing sodium hydroxide and cooper sulfateXV.Mixing hydrochloric acid, cooper sulfate and nitric acid.
Mixing cooper sulfate, hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide and nitric acid.XVI. Lab experiment with coins.
XVII. Coin A (In the left) with hydrochloric acid. Coin B (In the right) with nitric acid.Coin with hydrochloric acid, app...
ReferencesI. Notes on class.II. Virtual activities Link;http://my.hrw.com/sh2/sh07_10/student/flash/virtual_investigations...
VIRTUAL LAP REPORT: RESEARCH AND OBSERVATIONS IN ORDER TODESIGN THE BEST BOAT.BY: PEDRO JOSÉ GARCÍA ROMERO.GRADE: 7.B.TEAC...
In the following lab report you will find a virtual lab activity in which two boats will becompared, tested and evaluates ...
Velocity is relative. Consider a car moving at 20 m/s with respect to the surface of ahighway, traveling northward. If you...
7. Objectives- Calculate the average acceleration between two points of references.- Record your answers on a report lab f...
8. Materials and ReactiveMaterials:- Computer.- Internet.- Note pad.- Username and Password for the Holt McDougal eBook.- ...
9. ProcedureStage 1:1. Click Start to direct the speedboats to move from Point A to Point E.2. Calculate the average accel...
10. Observations and Results- As you analyze the graph and chart it is visible that the new model definitelydemonstrated a...
11. Conclusions- Average acceleration and velocity in different conditions could affect theperformance, of, in this case b...
12. AppendixPIC#1 Average Acceleration FormulaPIC#2 Average acceleration Graph (Stage 1 experiment)PIC#3 Average accelerat...
PIC#4 Downstream results Chart (Stage 2 experiment)PIC#5 Upstream results Chart (Stage 2 experiment)References
- http://www.mansfieldct.org/Schools/MMS/staff/hand/Lawsmotion.htm- http://my.hrw.com/tabnav/controller.jsp?isbn=003046249...
BY: PEDRO JOSE GARCIA ROMERO.GRADO: 7.B.The motion of an object d detected to a references point.One of the laws of motion...
the rocket to move upward with equal force. (Gravity, of course,is opposing its acceleration during this reaction.)- If yo...
By: Pedro José Garcia Romero.Grade: 7.B.Pre-Reading Activity, Section: Measuring MotionWrite a formal description in your ...
PEDRO GARCIA STAGE 7B2nd QUIZ - III BIMESTEREvaluate1. With new evolutionary evidence, scientistsare(A) discovering inaccu...
2nd QUIZ - III BIMESTERA. they produce their own foodB. they consume food from outside sourcesC. they have vertebraeD. the...
2nd QUIZ - III BIMESTERC. ProtistaD. Bacteria8. When a new organism is discovered, which ofthe following would be best use...
2nd QUIZ - III BIMESTER11. Which of the following characteristics splitsthe kingdom Animalia into two categories?A. gills ...
PEDRO JOSE GARCIA ROMERO.GRADE: 7.B.• Gravity causes all objects to accelerate toward Earth at a rate of 9.8 m/s2.• Air re...
• Newton’s third law of motion states that whenever one object exerts a force on asecond object, the second object exerts ...
AVERAGE SPEED
FORCE AND MOTION ACTIVITY
All about biology in the 3 bimester biology
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All about biology in the 3 bimester biology

  1. 1. ALL ABOUT BIOLOGY IN THE 3BIMESTER.BY: PEDRO JOSÉ GARCÍA ROMERO.GRADE: 7.B.IDENTIFYING PHYSICAL & CHEMICAL CHANGES, PROPERTIES AND PROCESS USINGTHREE DIFFERENT SUBSTANCES.DANIEL OSPINA MONTOYA, PEDRO JOSÉ GARCÍA, JUAN FELIPE RICO, SANTIAGOSANGUINO 7BGRADE: 7.B.CLASS: BIOLOGY.VERMONT SCHOOLPhysical & Chemical Changes, Properties and Process Using Three Different Substances to Proof Ifa Coin Is Real or False.
  2. 2. Coin Measurement Activity Applying the Density to Proof its Real or FalsePhysical and Chemical Analysis Using Three Different SubstancesPHYSICAL & CHEMICAL CHANGES, PROPERTIES AND PROCESS USING THREEDIFFERENT SUBSTANCES TO PROOF IF A COIN IS REAL OR FALSE.Physical properties and changes and chemical properties and changes compare between bothIn this lab report we are going to learn about the physical changes and properties, chemical changesand properties. First we are going to have the theoretical background to learn about physical andchemical. Second we are going to see the objectives to see later a final result. Third we are going tosee the materials and the reactive that we used in the experiment. Fourth we are going to see theprocedure with the steps of the experiment. Fifth we are going to see the observations and results.Sixth the references and last the appendix with the pictures of the experiment.Theoretical backgroundA physical property is any property that is measurable whose value describes a physical systemsstate. The changes in the physical properties of a system can be used to describe its transformations(or evolutions between its momentary states) it haves changes too that are affecting the form of achemical substance, but do not change the chemical composition of that substance. Physicalchanges are used to separate mixtures into their component compounds, but cannot usually be usedto separate compounds into chemical elements or simpler compounds.A chemical property is any of a materials properties that becomes evident during a chemicalreaction; that is, any quality that can be established only by changing a substances chemicalidentity. Chemical have processes too. A chemical process is a method or means of somehowchanging one or more chemicals or chemical compounds. Such a chemical process can occur byitself or be caused by an outside force, and involves a chemical reaction of some sort.
  3. 3. Physical changes are changes affecting the form of a chemical substance, but do not change thechemical composition of that substance. Physical changes are used to separate mixtures into theircomponent compounds, but cannot usually be used to separate compounds into chemical elementsor simpler compounds.Chemical changes occur when a substance combines with another to form a new substance, calledsynthesis or, alternatively, decomposes into two or more different substances. These processes arecalled chemical reactions and, in general, are not reversible except by further chemical reactions.1. Objectivesa) Here we are going got know how to calculate density, identify the physical andchemical properties on a coin and get the formulas to get the mass, weight, volume, anddensity.b) Identify the physical and chemical properties on a coin using an acid.c) Identify the weight and mass of a coin with a cylinder and a balance.d) Know how a coin is different from an original coin having its density.
  4. 4. 2. Materials and ReactiveMaterials:a) Lab Coatb) Google’sc) Glovesd) CoinsReactive:a) Acid (Hydrogen Sulfide)b) Base (Sodium Hypochlorite)c) Baking Soda/Salt (Sodium Bicarbonate)
  5. 5. 3. ProcedureObservations:As said, in these activities we are proving if a coin is real or false thanks to density and howit does react to chemical and physical process. In the procedure you will find threeprocedures; two Virtual activities and one Lab activity. For the two Virtual activities followthis link; -http://my.hrw.com/sh2/sh07_10/student/flash/virtual_investigations/hst/mat/hst_mat_vi.html. You can find it in the References too.I. Virtual Activity Stage 1a. Click Coin A. When the coin reaches the triple beam balance, measure itsmass.b. Record the mass in the data chart, and then click Evaluate.c. Read the initial volume of water in the graduated cylinder by observing thebottom of the meniscus (you can find the meaning in the Glossary sectionof the Theoretical Background).d. Record the volume of water in the data chart, and then click Evaluate.e. Click Coin A. When the coin is in the graduated cylinder, read the volumeof water as in step C., observing the bottom of the meniscus (observe photo#1 in the Appendix).f. Record the volume of water in the data chart. (The reading/number will berounded for you). Then click Evaluate.g. Record your answer in the final column of the chart, and then clickEvaluate.h. Repeat steps A. to G. with Coin B.II. Virtual Activities Recording:a. Use the information from your data chart to calculate the density of CoinA. Refer to the Hint if you need help.b. Click the Calculator icon on the right to access the calculator if required.c. Round the density calculation to one decimal place.d. Enter the density of coin A in the data chart, and then click Evaluate.e. Repeat steps A. to D. for Coin B.III. Virtual lab Activity Stage 2a. Click on the lab coat, protective gloves, and safety goggles. Then, clickEnter.b. Move your pointer over a labeled container to learn more about thecleaning substance.c. Click the first coin on the left side of the screen. Carefully observe the waythe coin looks before cleaning.d. Click Continue to begin the cleaning process.e. Carefully observe the coin after the cleaning takes place, and then clickContinue.
  6. 6. f. You can use the Close-up button on the left at any time to see how the coinlooked before cleaning. Use the Close-up button on the right to see how acoin looks after a cleaning.g. Repeat steps C. to E. for the second and third coins.h. Answer the questions, and then click Evaluate.
  7. 7. 4. Observations and ResultsI. Physical science lab stage 1a. In the first coin the coin (A) the mass was (26.7g) then the level of the water was (50.0ml) without the coin and the level of the water after they put the coin insidewas (52.6ml) and the volume of the coin (A) is (2.6cm3) .(go to appendix to picture(1)b. In the second coin (B) the mass was (26.3g) then the level of the water was(50.0ml) without the coin and the level of the water after they put the coin insidewas (52.8ml) and the volume of the coin (A) is (2.8cm3) .(go to appendix topicture(2)c. Then I took the mass of the coin (A) and I divided it with the volume and that wasthe density and the density was (10.3g/cm3). (go to appendix to picture (3)d. Then I took the mass of the coin (B) and I divided it with the volume and that wasthe density and the density was (9.4g/cm3). (Go to appendix to picture 4)e. Then with the authentic table chart of the authentic coin I saw comparing the massand the density I saw that the coin (A) is the authentic and the coin (B) is false. (Goto appendix to picture 5)II. Physical science lab stage 2a. In the first coin I put it with hydrogen sulfide solution and the coin after a minutethe coin start decreasing in his density. (go to appendix to picture 6)b. In the second coin I used sodium hypochlorite and it became so colorful andbrightly. (go to appendix to picture 7)c. In the third coin I used baking soda and the coin doesn´t change, the baking sodaonly cleaned the coin.(go to appendix to picture 8)
  8. 8. 5. ConclusionsI. The coin a (100 pesos) = before de HN3=3.3 g. After= 2.5g. So the coin low 0.8g.II. The coin b (200 pesos) = before de HCL=7.1g. After= 6.0g. So the coin low 1.1g.III. The test tube A in HaOH separate, change color light to dark.IV. The test tube C in the Nitric Acid change lighter color.V. The test tube B in the HCL color change (yellow), smells bad, hydrogen release, notVI. TA + TB change temperature, change color, dark emerald.VII. TA +TAB + TC + AMONIA smells to chlorine.VIII. Steering gases liberator, exothermic, different smell, and combustion.
  9. 9. 6. Appendix#Note: These photos have been taken using the camera on the cellphones of Juan FelipeGarcia and Daniel Ospina Montoya, and using PrintDesktop function in windows for virtualactivities images. Link for virtual activities (it is also in the references page at the end of thereport);http://my.hrw.com/sh2/sh07_10/student/flash/virtual_investigations/hst/mat/hst_mat_vi.html.I. Stage 1
  10. 10. II. 3.III. Stage 2.
  11. 11. IV. 5.V. 6.
  12. 12. VI. 7.VII. 8.
  13. 13. VIII.Test tubes.
  14. 14. IX.Mixing zinc with nitric acid.
  15. 15. X.Mixing zinc with sodium hydroxide.XI.Mixing zinc with nitric acid and sodium hydroxide.
  16. 16. XII.Mixing zinc with hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide and nitric acid.XIII.Cooper sulfate
  17. 17. XIV.Mixing sodium hydroxide and cooper sulfateXV.Mixing hydrochloric acid, cooper sulfate and nitric acid.
  18. 18. Mixing cooper sulfate, hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide and nitric acid.XVI. Lab experiment with coins.
  19. 19. XVII. Coin A (In the left) with hydrochloric acid. Coin B (In the right) with nitric acid.Coin with hydrochloric acid, approximately past an hour.Coin with nitric acid approximately past an hour.
  20. 20. ReferencesI. Notes on class.II. Virtual activities Link;http://my.hrw.com/sh2/sh07_10/student/flash/virtual_investigations/hst/mat/hst_mat_vi.html.III. http://my.hrw.com/sh2/sh07_10/student/flash/virtual_investigations/hst/mat/hst_mat_vi.htmlIV. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_ChangesV. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_changeVI. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_propertyVII. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_property
  21. 21. VIRTUAL LAP REPORT: RESEARCH AND OBSERVATIONS IN ORDER TODESIGN THE BEST BOAT.BY: PEDRO JOSÉ GARCÍA ROMERO.GRADE: 7.B.TEACHER: JESÚS EDUARDO CARBONO NIEVLES.CLASS: BIOLOGY.VERMONT SCHOOL MEDELLIN.APRIL 8 2013.2013INTRODUCTION
  22. 22. In the following lab report you will find a virtual lab activity in which two boats will becompared, tested and evaluates in two different experiments as to decide which will beshown and recommended for the client. First of all you will find a brief theoretical feedbackabout formulas, definitions and some facts which will be used as references to analyze theboats designs. After this feedback the objectives to achieve will be listed, followed by thematerials and reactive used in thus experiments. Fourth of all the procedure will be listedtoo.THEORETICAL BACKGROUNDAverage acceleration is the rate at which velocity changes. Average acceleration is thechange in velocity divided by an elapsed time. Average acceleration can be defined as therate at which the velocity of an object between two points changes, too Use this equation tofind the average acceleration; equation PIC#1 in Appendix section.In physics, acceleration is the rate at which the velocity of a body changes with time. Ingeneral, velocity and acceleration are vector quantities, with magnitude and direction,though in many cases only magnitude is considered (sometimes with negative values fordeceleration, treating it as a one dimensional vector). Acceleration is accompanied by aforce, as described by Newtons Second Law; the force, as a vector, is the product of themass of the object being accelerated and the acceleration (vector). The SI unit ofacceleration is the meter per second squared (m/s2).Velocity is the rate of change of the position of an object, equivalent to a specification of itsspeed and direction of motion. Speed describes only how fast an object is moving, whereasvelocity gives both how fast and in what direction the object is moving Velocities in thesame direction can be added together to find the resultant velocity. For velocities inopposite directions, subtract the smaller velocity from the larger to find the resultantvelocity. The resultant velocity is in the direction of the larger velocity.Velocity is a vector expression of the displacement that an object or particle undergoes withrespect to time. The standard unit of velocity magnitude (also known as speed) is the meterper second (m/s). Alternatively, the centimeter per second (cm/s) can be used to expressvelocity magnitude. The direction of a velocity vector can be expressed in various ways,depending on the number of dimensions involved.
  23. 23. Velocity is relative. Consider a car moving at 20 m/s with respect to the surface of ahighway, traveling northward. If you are driving the car, the velocity of the car relative toyour body is zero. If you stand by the side of the road, the velocity of the car relative to youis 20 m/s northward. If you are driving a car at 15 m/s with respect to the road and aretraveling northward, and another car moving 20 m/s with respect to the road passes you inthe same direction, that other cars velocity relative to you is 5 m/s northward. But if thatother car passes you going the opposite way on the road, its velocity relative to you is 35m/s southward.Circular motion illustrates the fundamental difference between speed and velocity. Think ofyourself whirling a ball, tied to a string, around your body so the balls tangential speed is10 m/s. Even though the balls speed is constant relative to your body, its velocity relativeto your body constantly changes as the direction vector describes circles. Velocity can beexpressed either as an average over a period of time, or as an instantaneous value at a singlemoment in time. Suppose you are in a car that is not moving relative to the road surface,and then you hit the accelerator and increase velocity uniformly from zero to 30 m/snorthward in a few seconds. Your average velocity over that time frame is 15 m/snorthward. However, the instantaneous velocity depends on time, and might be anythingbetween zero and 30 m/s northward, depending on the exact moment at which it ismeasured.In agile software development, velocity (V) is the budget of story units available forplanning the next iteration of a development project. Velocity is based on measurementstaken during previous iteration cycles. Velocity is calculated by adding the originalestimates of the stories that were successfully delivered in iteration. In biochemistry,velocity (V) is the number of reactions per second catalyzed per mole of an enzyme. Alsosee meter per second, vector, International System of Units (SI), and the Table of PhysicalUnits.
  24. 24. 7. Objectives- Calculate the average acceleration between two points of references.- Record your answers on a report lab following the APA template.- Analyze the two boats designs to decide which to present for the client:Decide on the virtual lab which model has the higher average acceleration.Decide on the virtual lab which model has the higher average velocity.
  25. 25. 8. Materials and ReactiveMaterials:- Computer.- Internet.- Note pad.- Username and Password for the Holt McDougal eBook.- Activity Link.- Camera or PDF installed to take observations and pictures from the activity.- Pencil.Reactive:- Air.- Electricity.- Water.
  26. 26. 9. ProcedureStage 1:1. Click Start to direct the speedboats to move from Point A to Point E.2. Calculate the average acceleration between one point and the next, for example,between Point A and Point B. * Calculations chart and graph in Appendix sectionPICS #2 and #3.3. Record your answers in the final column in the data chart. And then click Evaluate.4. Decide which model has the higher average acceleration, and then click Evaluate. *Choice in the Results section.Stage 2:1. Click Start to begin. You will first race in the downstream direction. Gear 1 isalready activated for you.2. On approaching Point A, click Gear 2 to change speed. If you do not change thespeed within five seconds you will have to restart the race.3. On approaching Point A, click Gear 3 to change speed. If you do not change thespeed within five seconds you will have to restart the race.4. Calculate the resultant velocity of the speedboat (downstream), record the velocityin the data chart, and then click Evaluate. * Chart with downstream results in theappendix.5. Click the Upstream button to change the direction and then repeat steps a) to d). *Chart with upstream results in the appendix.6. Select the correct answer for the question from the options given, and then clickEvaluate.
  27. 27. 10. Observations and Results- As you analyze the graph and chart it is visible that the new model definitelydemonstrated a greater average acceleration than the old one. PICS #2 and #3.- In the Downstream test it achieved a lot better velocity in comparison to the oldmodel one.- As in the downstream test in the Upstream test the new model boat “win” again,achieving not as much as the downstream velocity but a lot better improvementin comparison to the old model boat. PICS #4 and #5.
  28. 28. 11. Conclusions- Average acceleration and velocity in different conditions could affect theperformance, of, in this case boat.- -Average acceleration can be known by dividing the results of this subtractions;Final velocity-Initial Velocity, over (/), Final Time-Initial Time; also known aschange in velocity over change in time. *Formula PIC#1.- Velocity is not the same as speed. They are similar as they both are rates of thechange of the motion of an object, never forgetting that velocity gives us thedirection in which this moves.- So, resultant velocity can be finding in two ways; for velocities in oppositedirections, subtract the smaller velocity from the larger to find the resultantvelocity. The resultant velocity is in the direction of the larger velocity.
  29. 29. 12. AppendixPIC#1 Average Acceleration FormulaPIC#2 Average acceleration Graph (Stage 1 experiment)PIC#3 Average acceleration Chart (Stage 1 experiment)
  30. 30. PIC#4 Downstream results Chart (Stage 2 experiment)PIC#5 Upstream results Chart (Stage 2 experiment)References
  31. 31. - http://www.mansfieldct.org/Schools/MMS/staff/hand/Lawsmotion.htm- http://my.hrw.com/tabnav/controller.jsp?isbn=0030462495- http://my.hrw.com/sh2/sh07_10/student/flash/virtual_investigations/hst/mot/hst_mot_vi.html- http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/velocity
  32. 32. BY: PEDRO JOSE GARCIA ROMERO.GRADO: 7.B.The motion of an object d detected to a references point.One of the laws of motion are:- Every object in a state of uniform motion tends to remain inthat state of motion unless an external force is applied to it.- The relationship between an objects mass m, itsacceleration a, and the applied force F is F = ma.Acceleration and force are vectors (as indicated by theirsymbols being displayed in slant bold font); in this law thedirection of the force vector is the same as the direction ofthe acceleration vector.- For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.Example:- A rocket can be launched into space because the hot gasesfrom it are being propelled downward from the rocket, causingCLASSWORK
  33. 33. the rocket to move upward with equal force. (Gravity, of course,is opposing its acceleration during this reaction.)- If you throw a heavy ball or block away from your body, theforce exerted will push back on you, possibly pushing youbackward onto the ground.- You find it hard to walk on a slippery surface because the onlyway you can walk forward is for your foot to push backward onthe surface of the ground. Through friction, the ground isessentially "pushing back" against the force of your step.
  34. 34. By: Pedro José Garcia Romero.Grade: 7.B.Pre-Reading Activity, Section: Measuring MotionWrite a formal description in your notepad of your position in theclassroom using a reference point and a set of referencedirections. For example, you might say, “I sit three desks behindCarlos’s desk”. Then, write a similar description for your home,and for an object in your room.1. I am a student from the stage of 7.B at the 205 classroom. Infront of the board, in the table number C-205-5 in the post C-205-5-4.2. My house is in the direction Kilometer 6 Llanogrande, myhouse is close to the Mall Llanogrande then in a road at theright of the mall there is the house.3. My TV is in of my bedroom, close to my bed, close to thewalls and close to the window, the TV is on a table.ACTIVITY IN CLASS
  35. 35. PEDRO GARCIA STAGE 7B2nd QUIZ - III BIMESTEREvaluate1. With new evolutionary evidence, scientistsare(A) discovering inaccuracies in past taxonomicclassifications(B) considering including a family name withinnomenclature as well, for a trinomial nomenclaturesystem(C) trying to name living things based on how theyevolved rather than what they look like(D) considering adding a taxa more specific thanspecies2. Fill in the blanks with the seven levels ofclassification, from broadest to most specific.3. Which of the following is true of all animals?A. they lay eggsB. they produce their own foodC. they consume food from outside sourcesD. they have backbones4. Which of the following characteristics do allplants share?
  36. 36. 2nd QUIZ - III BIMESTERA. they produce their own foodB. they consume food from outside sourcesC. they have vertebraeD. they produce food through photosynthesis5. Which of the following organisms areclassified in the kingdom Fungi?A. earthwormB. mushroomC. sea cucumberD. E coliE. moleF. yeast6. Which of the following kingdoms containssome organisms that make their own food andsome that consume it from outside sources?A. AnimaliaB. PlantaeC. FungiD. Protista7. Which of the following kingdoms containsorganisms with no nuclear membrane?A. ArchaeaB. Animalia
  37. 37. 2nd QUIZ - III BIMESTERC. ProtistaD. Bacteria8. When a new organism is discovered, which ofthe following would be best used to classify itinto the appropriate kingdom?A. the location where the organism was foundB. the color of the organismC. the climate where the organism was foundD. the organism’s anatomical structure9. Which of the following kingdoms contain onlyorganisms that consume food from outsidesources?A. AnimaliaB. PlantaeC. FungiD. Protista10. The kingdoms Fungi and Plantae aredifferent becauseA. fungi have vertebrae, while plants do not.B. cell walls in fungi are made of chitin, while those inplants are not.C. some fungi consume food, but all plants producetheir own food.D. plants have cell walls, but fungi do not.
  38. 38. 2nd QUIZ - III BIMESTER11. Which of the following characteristics splitsthe kingdom Animalia into two categories?A. gills versus lungsB. endoskeletons vs. exoskeletonsC. vertebrates versus non-vertebratesD. carnivores versus herbivores
  39. 39. PEDRO JOSE GARCIA ROMERO.GRADE: 7.B.• Gravity causes all objects to accelerate toward Earth at a rate of 9.8 m/s2.• Air resistance slows the acceleration of falling objects. An object falls at its terminalvelocity when the upward force of air resistance equals the downward force of gravity.• An object is in free fall if gravity is the only force acting on it.• Objects in orbit appear to be weightless because they are in free fall.• A centripetal force is needed to keep objects in circular motion. Gravity acts as acentripetal force to keep objects in orbit.• Projectile motion is the curved path an object follows when thrown or propellednear the surface of Earth.• Projectile motion has two components—horizontal motion and vertical motion.Gravity affects only the vertical motion of projectile motion.• Newton’s first law of motion states that the motion of an object will not change ifno unbalanced forces act on it.• Objects at rest will not move unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.• Objects in motion will continue to move at a constant speed and in a straight lineunless acted upon by an unbalanced force.• Inertia is the tendency of matter to resist a change in motion. Mass is a measure ofinertia.• Newton’s second law of motion states that the acceleration of an object dependson its mass and on the force exerted on it.• Newton’s second law is represented by the following equation: F =m* a.NOTES OF THE EXAM
  40. 40. • Newton’s third law of motion states that whenever one object exerts a force on asecond object, the second object exerts an equal and opposite force on the firstobject.• Energy is the ability to do work, and work equals the transfer of energy. Energy andwork are expressed in units of joules (J).• Kinetic energy is energy of motion and depends on speed and mass.• Potential energy is energy of position. Gravitational potential energy depends onweight and height.• Mechanical energy is the sum of kinetic energy and potential energy.• Thermal energy and sound energy can be considered forms of kinetic energy.• Chemical energy, electrical energy, and nuclear energy can be considered forms ofpotential energy.• An energy resource is a natural resource that can be converted into other forms ofenergy in order to do useful work.• Nonrenewable resources cannot be replaced after they are used or can be replacedonly after long periods of time. They include fossil fuels and nuclear energy.• Renewable resources can be replaced in nature over a relatively short period oftime. They include energy from the sun, wind, and water; geothermal energy; andbiomass.• The sun is the source of most energy on Earth.• Choices about energy resources depend on where you live and what you needenergy for.
  41. 41. AVERAGE SPEED
  42. 42. FORCE AND MOTION ACTIVITY

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