The Learning Rollercoaster Peter Vaka, Newsline Media Ron Lambert, Yukon Group
Companies and organizations across the US  waste more than $30B each year watching employees ride “The Learning RollerCoas...
Estimates of Learning Process Funding Value Contributed by Learning Phase 26% 24% 50% 10% 85% 5% BEFORE DURING AFTER
<ul><li>Stand up and Pair up with someone new </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Your Phone Number </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Your Stre...
The Learning Curve
The Forgetting Curve 1 hr 44.2% 1 day 33.7% 2 days 27.8% 6 days 25.4% 21.1% 31 days
<ul><ul><li>Share Phone Number </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Share Street Address  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review Phone Nu...
How Can We Improve Learning? <ul><li>Repetition </li></ul><ul><li>Retrieval Practice </li></ul><ul><li>Aligning Context </...
How Can We Sustain Momentum Built During the Learning Event?
Repetition Retrieval Practice Aligning Context Spacing Coaching and Feedback
Repetition Retrieval Practice Aligning Context Spacing Coaching and Feedback
Cameo is an easy-to-use, web-based tool that delivers scenario-based  Learning Reinforcement  via email
1.  Identify Key Learning Points 2.  Build Short Learning Scenarios 3.  Learners   Attend   Course   Sessions 4.  Learners...
Conduct assessment to build custom course  design Make improvements in classroom and online courses Target areas to focus ...
<ul><li>Uses a system most people have mastered:  e-Mail </li></ul><ul><li>Does not require logging into multiple systems ...
 
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Cameo The Learning Roller Coaster

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Cameo is a web based learning reinforcement tool

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  • We can talk thru this on our call … my suggestions for how we could divide the workload. Let’s not have three versions of this … we can discuss changes on our call and I’ll manage them and make sure you both have a copy.
  • Show of hands … How many people out there like Rollercoaster&apos;s? OK … What do you like about them? &lt;Listen for 3-4 keywords&gt; Now … How many of you DON’T like Rollercoaster&apos;s? Why not? &lt;Listen for 3-4 keywords. Combine some keywords in your head&gt; So would it be good or bad if your Learners told you that the learning you provide makes them feel _________, _________, __________ and ___________?
  • When we think about a lot of learning that’s out there … we see a Rollercoaster. And not just any coaster. Williamsburg is the home of Busch Gardens &lt;A&gt; and the Loch Ness Monster, a 13-story high ride with drops of 114 feet that goes 60 miles per hour. For those of you that raised your hand earlier to my first question, I would highly recommend it. The Learning Rollercoaster is similar …. &lt;A&gt; Only bigger … about $135B annually in the US according to ASTD. But there are lot of amazing drops on this one as well. So much so that we believe that &lt;A&gt; Companies and organizations across the US waste more than $30B each year watching employees ride “The Learning Rollercoaster.” That’s a lot of money. Let’s see where those big drops are.
  • A few years ago, I came across an article in T&amp;D Magazine entitled “The Promise of Phase Three” written by Jack Zenger. I liked the article because it shared my view on learning … that it is a process and not an event. That there are things before, during and after a learning event that all contribute to the learning outcomes. In the article, Zenger cites some research into corporate training expenditures in the context of this three phase approach. He attributed spending in the US on training into each of these three categories. &lt;A&gt; So what percentage do you think is spent in each? 33-33-33? What do you think? &lt;listen, cite a few&gt; Let’s have a look. &lt;A&gt; 85% on what happens during the learning event. So that’s things like design, development and delivery. What do you think about those numbers? Are they typical for your organization? &lt;listen&gt; Well knowing how organizations spend their training dollars is ½ of the equation. The second half is “What do they get for their investment?” So in each phase, how much value is created? &lt;A&gt; What do you think? &lt;listen&gt; Here’s what he found. &lt;A&gt; Are there any rocket scientists in the room today? I don’t want o offend anyone when I say that this … but you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to see there is a big disconnect in phase three. &lt;A&gt; It looks like the main strategy at play there is Hope. &lt;A&gt;This is the Rollercoaster phenomenon that we’ll be talking about today. A lot of good things happen during some really good learning events only to see that momentum and those potential results dive like a rollercoaster at Busch Gardens. You see, we think that happens after the learning event is as important as what happens in the learning event.
  • Let’s do a quick exercise. &lt;A&gt; Everyone stand up and pair up with someone you don’t already know. &lt;Tally # groups&gt;. &lt;A&gt; We’ll need a Person A and a Person B … decide who’s who. &lt;A&gt; OK, A is going to be delivering information and B is going to be receiving it. When I say “Go,” Person A will share these three things with Person B: &lt;A&gt;Their Phone Number, Their Street Address and Their Zip Code Ron and I will demonstrate for you quickly. I’ll be Person A. &lt;Demonstrate&gt; OK … everyone ready? OK … Go! Great … now when I say Go, I want Person B to repeat the phone number they heard to Person A. Ready? “Go!” OK … Person A … raise your hand if your Partner was able to recite your phone number 100% correctly. &lt;Tally and compute&gt; Well … results were not so good. Why not? &lt;solicit ideas, 3-4&gt; Hold on to those thoughts, if you can remember them &lt;wink&gt; … we’re going to come back to them in a bit.
  • Has everyone heard of The Learning Curve? &lt;A&gt; How would you describe the Learning Curve? &lt;solicit some ideas&gt;
  • What is the opposite of the Learning Curve? &lt;listen&gt; That’s right … &lt;A&gt; The Forgetting Curve or I think someone said “The UnLearning Curve.” There have been hundreds of studies and research done on memory and learning retention. One of the most foundational of these early studies was done by a German Psychologist named Hermann Ebbinghaus in 1885. What he found as that after learning new information, the retention of that information decays over time. More specifically, he found &lt;A&gt; one hour following the event, only 44.2% remained of the information was retained. A day later &lt;A&gt;, 33%. Two days later &lt;A&gt;, 27.8%. 6 days later … &lt;A&gt; only about 25% remains. And a month later, &lt;A&gt; the number drops to 21%. What causes us to forget information at such an alarming rate? &lt;listen, 3-4&gt;
  • &lt;A&gt; OK … let’s get back in our original pairs. Except this time, Person B is going to be sharing information with Person A. &lt;A&gt; When I say “Go,” Person B will communicate the following with Person A &lt;A&gt; Their phone number, Their Street Address, Review Phone Number, Their Zip Code, Review Phone Number Ron and I will demonstrate &lt;Demonstrate&gt; Ready? OK … “Go!” OK … Person B … raise your hand if your Partner was able to recite your phone number 100% correctly. &lt;Tally and compute&gt; Better this time? Aside from the prior knowledge that Person A had from the previous game, why was our percentage higher? &lt;listen, 2-3&gt; Right. Those are in fact some of the things that have been proven to improve retention over time.
  • So How Can We Improve Learning? You’ve already mentioned some of these … but let’s look at five specific factors that can improve learning outcomes. The five are &lt;A&gt;Repetition, Retrieval Practice, Spacing, Aligning Context and Coaching and Feedback. These factors and the numbers I am going to share with you come from a presentation Dr Will Thalheimer made at a 2005 conference on distance learning. Let’s start at the top with Repetition. The work of Ebbinghaus and others shows that repetition strengthens learning and decreases the amount of time needed to relearn something that is forgotten. Estimates on how much repetition can improve learning outcomes ranges from &lt;A&gt;15 to 40%. Stimulating recall from memory interrupts forgetting and increases the likelihood of retrieval in the future. Retrieval practice can improve learning outcomes anywhere from &lt;A&gt; 30 to 100%. By providing Spacing between repetitions, Dr Thalheimer estimates that learning outcomes can be improved by &lt;A&gt; 5 – 40%. Aligning context. What do we mean by that? &lt;listen&gt; Right. It’s presenting the content in a context that is realistic for the learner. This way, the learner does not have to jump from a “textbook” context to a real world one. Context alignment can improve learning outcomes anywhere from &lt;A&gt; 10 – 55%. And finally, coaching and feedback. What does good coaching and feedback allow the Learner to do? &lt;listen&gt; Right. It allows the learner to check their understanding and then correct any misconceptions. Providing coaching and feedback can improve learning outcomes from &lt;A&gt; 15 to 50%. So what if you were able to apply more than one of these factors or principles to a learning solution? What do you think the result word be? &lt;listen&gt; Well what if you could apply all five at the same time? It’s optimistic to think you could do that … but if so, you might be able to improve learning outcomes &lt;A&gt; by up to 75%. So that’s both the challenge and the opportunity. I am going to turn it over to Ron Lambert whose company is doing their part to rise to that challenge and deliver those kind of results. Ron.
  • Thanks, Peter. My name is Ron Lambert and I guess you can say I’m a local. I live in Mathews, Virginia on the Mobjack Bay. By car its about xxx and by boat its about xxx. 20 years ago, I left a senior position with the pharmaceutical company AH Robins (now Wyeth) and started a learning and development company in Richmond. I had become dissatisfied with the training provided by the many vendors we had worked with and I knew I could offer something different. Since that time, the company has grown and we have conducted classroom and online training with companies large and small in both the private and public sectors. A few years ago, we began to identify a disturbing trend. While our Instructors are some of the best in the business, the momentum they built during the learning event often dwindled away following the course. The Rollercoaster that Peter talked about earlier. It was a trend that we didn’t like because we felt that the ROI that we provided our customers began to trickle away as well. &lt;A&gt; So we began to look for a way to help our clients sustain that momentum that was built in the learning event … &lt;A&gt; to use principles of learning to overcome the effects of forgetting.
  • We started our quest by looking for a commercially available product that would achieve this goal and do it effectively and efficiently. We talked with customers and searched the marketplace but couldn’t find something that worked well. So we chartered a team inside the company to work on the project led by our current CEO who has more than 20 years of hands on experience in the learning industry. The team sought to build “something” that would leverage the factors that Peter mentioned - &lt;A&gt; Repetition, Retrieval, Spacing, Context and Feedback. They also wanted to build something that was easy to use for the Learner and that provided valuable information for the Learning and Development professional. They worked on the project for over a year before they had a solid concept.
  • &lt;A&gt; The result is a product that we launched in October of last year at Elliot Masie’s Learning 2008 conference in Orlando. &lt;A&gt; That product is Cameo.
  • &lt;A&gt; Cameo is a web-based tool that delivers scenario-based learning reinforcement via email. It is a simple but powerful product that helps organizations overcome the Rollercoaster effect.
  • (A) First, you start with a learning event. It can be anything from a Presentation Skills course that people attend in the classroom to an online course on workplace safety.   Once you’ve identified the learning event, the next step is to identify key learning points for the course. Quite often, these come from the course learning objectives or course topic areas. (A) After you have identified the key learning points for your course, you log in to Cameo and build short learning scenarios for each key learning point.   Each scenario consists of a brief paragraph describing a situation around the key learning point, a decision to be made by the learner, and several options to choose from in making that decision. Then, just as they do today, Learners attend the courses they have been enrolled in … whether they are instructor-led or online. (A) After Learners attend the course sessions, they begin to receive the scenarios you created via email. Learners can receive these scenarios anywhere they receive email …. On their desktop or laptop computer or even on their cell phone or PDA. The scenarios are sent out based on a frequency you establish for the course, typically once per week.   When the Learner receives the email they read the situation, reflect back to what they learned in the course and then select the best option for the given situation. (A) After making their selection, their response is sent back to Cameo. Almost immediately, Learners receive another email with Coaching and Feedback. This email message reviews the situation, the options available and the choice made by the Learner. Then the Learner is given choice-specific feedback and coaching based on their decision. Cameo can even redirect them to somewhere on the web or your Intranet for remediation.   So in about one minute’s time, you can reinforce a key learning point from the course with all of your Learners. But that’s just the beginning. (A) As Cameo continues to deliver learning reinforcement to your learners, their responses are aggregated within Cameo.   As the data is captured, you can use Cameo Reports to target areas for improvement. Cameo lets you take a look back at the effectiveness of the learning event and gives you actionable data for future learning efforts. The robust reporting system inside Cameo lets you slice and dice the data along a number of levels including by department, course or topic … all the way down to the individual level. You can even see the distribution of responses for each individual scenario.   Let me take a minute and show you just how easy it is to do. &lt;Now do demo&gt;
  • Companies are using Cameo in a variety of ways. &lt;A&gt; Some are using it to “look backward” and make improvements to existing learning events. &lt;A&gt; Others are using Cameo to “look forward” to target focus areas for follow-up training. &lt;A&gt; And one client is using Cameo in a very unique way. They are delivering learning scenarios daily to a group of managers and leaders BEFORE they design the learning event … so they can customize the training based on real and not perceived needs. Can you imagine going to a class where they don’t spend a lot of time covering topics you already know?
  • &lt;Stop by booth message goes here … we need to collaborate on this&gt;
  • Cameo The Learning Roller Coaster

    1. 2. The Learning Rollercoaster Peter Vaka, Newsline Media Ron Lambert, Yukon Group
    2. 3. Companies and organizations across the US waste more than $30B each year watching employees ride “The Learning RollerCoaster.” <ul><li>13 Stories Tall </li></ul><ul><li>Drops of 114 feet </li></ul><ul><li>Speeds of 60mph </li></ul>Loch Ness Monster
    3. 4. Estimates of Learning Process Funding Value Contributed by Learning Phase 26% 24% 50% 10% 85% 5% BEFORE DURING AFTER
    4. 5. <ul><li>Stand up and Pair up with someone new </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Your Phone Number </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Your Street Address </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Your Zip code </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Identify Person A and Person B </li></ul><ul><li>When I Say “Go,” Person A Shares the Following Items One at a Time with Person B </li></ul>Activity A B A B
    5. 6. The Learning Curve
    6. 7. The Forgetting Curve 1 hr 44.2% 1 day 33.7% 2 days 27.8% 6 days 25.4% 21.1% 31 days
    7. 8. <ul><ul><li>Share Phone Number </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Share Street Address </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review Phone Number with A </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Share Zip code </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review Phone Number with A </li></ul></ul><ul><li>When I Say “Go,” Person B Communicates with Person A the Following: </li></ul><ul><li>Back in Original Pairs </li></ul>Activity A B A B
    8. 9. How Can We Improve Learning? <ul><li>Repetition </li></ul><ul><li>Retrieval Practice </li></ul><ul><li>Aligning Context </li></ul><ul><li>Spacing </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching and Feedback </li></ul>
    9. 10. How Can We Sustain Momentum Built During the Learning Event?
    10. 11. Repetition Retrieval Practice Aligning Context Spacing Coaching and Feedback
    11. 12. Repetition Retrieval Practice Aligning Context Spacing Coaching and Feedback
    12. 13. Cameo is an easy-to-use, web-based tool that delivers scenario-based Learning Reinforcement via email
    13. 14. 1. Identify Key Learning Points 2. Build Short Learning Scenarios 3. Learners Attend Course Sessions 4. Learners Receive Scenarios 5. Learners Receive Feedback <ul><li>Cameo Aggregates Data </li></ul>
    14. 15. Conduct assessment to build custom course design Make improvements in classroom and online courses Target areas to focus on in follow-up training
    15. 16. <ul><li>Uses a system most people have mastered: e-Mail </li></ul><ul><li>Does not require logging into multiple systems </li></ul><ul><li>Improves both learning retention and transfer </li></ul><ul><li>Provides objective, actionable data for company </li></ul><ul><li>Gets your Learners off “The Learning Rollercoaster” </li></ul>Cameo is an easy-to-use, web-based tool that delivers scenario-based Learning Reinforcement via email

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