French Institute of PetroleumCEOJOSÉ SÉRGIO GABRIELLI DE AZEVEDOMay 23rd,  2011FRANCE                                     ...
DISCLAIMERFORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS:DISCLAIMERThe presentation may contain forward-looking statements about future       ...
PRIMARY DEMAND FOR ENERGY – BREAKDOWN BY FUEL (MM TOE)                                          16.882                    ...
ACCORDING TO MOST OF THE INSTITUTIONS, NATURAL GAS WILL PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE FILLING THE GAP LEFT BY THE CURRENT OFFLINE...
ALTHOUGH  THERE  IS  AN  ONGOING  TRANSITION  ON  DEMAND  GROWTH  DYNAMICS, OECD MEMBERS STILL ARE THE BIGGEST OIL‐CONSUMI...
THE REGION HOLDS SUFFICIENT NATURAL RESOURCES TO THE SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION OF FOOD AND BIOFUELSMain Biofuels Producers an...
ASIA,  LATIN  AMERICA  AND  MIDDLE  EAST  HAVE  THE  LARGEST  PROJECTS  OF NEW REFINERIES AND CAPACITY EXPANSIONS         ...
ALTHOUGH  THE  MAIN  EXPECTED  REFINING  PROJECTS  IN  THE  WORLD  ARE  EXPORT‐ ORIENTED,  IN  LATIN  AMERICA  AND  IN  AS...
SOUTH AMERICA IS NOT A MAIN SHIPPING ROUTE, BUT IT WILL INCREASE ITS OIL EXPORTS. ASIA WILL BECOME A MAJOR OIL CONSUMER, L...
FSU STAYS AS A MAJOR EXPORTER OF DIESEL AND FUEL OIL. NON‐CHINESE ASIA INCREASES ITS IMPORTS OF OIL PRODUCTS.             ...
WITH  NEW  REFINING  IN  ASIA,  LONG‐HAUL*  CRUDE  ROUTES  BECOME  MORE  RELEVANT TOWARDS THE EAST, BUT LONG‐HAUL ROUTES F...
THE  INDIAN  OCEAN  IS  EVER  MORE  CRITICAL  TO  OIL  AND  PRODUCTS  SHIPPING There are strategic risks in the strait of ...
WORLD DEMAND FOR OIL                                                      GLOBAL LIQUIDS DEMAND              120          ...
INTEGRATED VALUE CHAIN                                   Business Plan 2010‐2014                                        US...
GROWING PRODUCTION FULLY SUPPORTED BY DISCOVERIES                                                      Petrobras Total Pro...
TRENDS  IN  LATIN  AMERICA  OIL  PRODUCTION  REFLECT  THE  BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT IN EACH COUNTRY    4.0         Latin Ameri...
THE ACCESS TO BRAZILIAN E&P                                                 Mature Basins New Frontiers/  High Potential  ...
PRE-SALT SUSTAINABILITY       Ex: Commitment to give                                                          Local       ...
TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES                                 Subsea                                                           ...
BRAZILIAN DEMAND AND REFINING CAPACITY                                                                                    ...
BIOFUELS TARGETS AND INVESTMENTS 2010‐2014Continued expansion and integration with oil productsStrategyAct globally, on bi...
HUMAN RESOURCES PETROBRAS    Time in company (average): 14.6 years                                                        ...
TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT                         50 THEMATIC NETWORKS WITH 80 INSTITUTIONS                               ...
DEMANDS OF HUMAN RESOURCES ‐ BUSINESS PLAN 2010‐2014       2007   2008               2009           2010   2011   2012   2...
PETROBRAS CHALLENGES     Capacity to execute a huge portfolio project     Strength and reliability of supply chain     Res...
Presidente Jose Sergio Gabrielli de Azevedo. Apresentação durante o evento Nor-Shipping, Oslo.
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Presidente Jose Sergio Gabrielli de Azevedo. Apresentação durante o evento Nor-Shipping, Oslo.

  1. 1. French Institute of PetroleumCEOJOSÉ SÉRGIO GABRIELLI DE AZEVEDOMay 23rd,  2011FRANCE 1
  2. 2. DISCLAIMERFORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS:DISCLAIMERThe presentation may contain forward-looking statements about future We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise anyevents within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as forward-looking statements, whether as a result of newamended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as information or future events or for any other reason. Figuresamended, that are not based on historical facts and are not assurances of for 2010 on are estimates or targets.future results. Such forward-looking statements merely reflect theCompany’s current views and estimates of future economic circumstances,industry conditions, company performance and financial results. Such All forward-looking statements are expressly qualified in theirterms as "anticipate", "believe", "expect", "forecast", "intend", "plan", entirety by this cautionary statement, and you should not"project", "seek", "should", along with similar or analogous expressions, are place reliance on any forward-looking statement contained inused to identify such forward-looking statements. Readers are cautioned this presentation.that these statements are only projections and may differ materially fromactual future results or events. Readers are referred to the documentsfiled by the Company with the SEC, specifically the Company’s most NON-SEC COMPLIANT OIL AND GAS RESERVES:recent Annual Report on Form 20-F, which identify important risk factorsthat could cause actual results to differ from those contained in the CAUTIONARY STATEMENT FOR US INVESTORSforward-looking statements, including, among other things, risks relating to We present certain data in this presentation, such as oil andgeneral economic and business conditions, including crude oil and other gas resources, that we are not permitted to present incommodity prices, refining margins and prevailing exchange rates, documents filed with the United States Securities anduncertainties inherent in making estimates of our oil and gas reserves Exchange Commission (SEC) under new Subpart 1200 toincluding recently discovered oil and gas reserves, international and Regulation S-K because such terms do not qualify as proved,Brazilian political, economic and social developments, receipt of probable or possible reserves under Rule 4-10(a) ofgovernmental approvals and licenses and our ability to obtain financing. Regulation S-X.
  3. 3. PRIMARY DEMAND FOR ENERGY – BREAKDOWN BY FUEL (MM TOE) 16.882 Average Annual Growth (% p.y.) 16.590 Business as  Sustainable  9% 1,3% Usual Development 2,2% 10% Traditional  +1,0% +1,4% 1,4% 3% 1% Biomass 6% 3,5% 1,3% 3% Other  12.271 Renewable* +6,4% +8,5% 7% 9% 0,7% 28% Biofuels +5,8% +7,2% 2% 0,4% 6% 25% Hidro +2,0% +2,4% 27% Nuclear +1,2% +1,9% 22% 22% 21% Coal +1,6% +0,9% Gas +1,5% +1,6% 30% 29% 33% Oil +0,96% +0,72% 2008 Business as  2007 2030 Sustainable  2030 Usual Development • Loss of oil relative participation in primary energy demand•Wind, Solar (PV e CSP), Geothermal,  Marine (Tide and Wave) • Significant growth of biofuels and other renewable, driven by •Source: 2008 – IEA ; 2030 –Petrobras’ Scenarios technological advances • Low gas prices may result in higher gas participation over time 3
  4. 4. ACCORDING TO MOST OF THE INSTITUTIONS, NATURAL GAS WILL PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE FILLING THE GAP LEFT BY THE CURRENT OFFLINE NUCLEAR CAPACITY Possible outcomes to the mix of fossil energy that will substitute offline nuclear capacity WoodMackensie Societé Générale Barclays Capital Credit Suisse PIRA Onagawa;  Coal; 14% Coal; 11% Coal; 10% 2.174 Coal; 20% Coal; 20% Natural Gas;  20% Natural Gas;  Fukushima  Natural Gas;  39% Daiishi; 4.696 Natural Gas;  47% 40% Natural Gas;  50% Oil Products; Fukushina 70% Daini; 4.400 Oil Products; Oil Products,  Oil Products;  50% 40% 39% Oil Products, Tokai Daini;  30%  1.100Offline Nuclear Capacity (MW) Substituição Substitution Substitution Substituição Substitution Substituição Substitution Substituição Substitution Substituição 81500 Gw/h – 75%  Japanese spot LNG prices lower than oil in an energy equivalent basis Natural  gas  import  infrastructure  not  much  affected  and  already operating    with  significant spare capacity  40 regasification terminals and a big storage capacity (35 day of demand) Assumptions: It is expected that coal plants will be restored to full capacity. Capacity Factor: 75% nuclear; time horizon 12 months Source: GE-MC/MKT/PREÇOS e GE-MC/SGN/CGNL 4
  5. 5. ALTHOUGH  THERE  IS  AN  ONGOING  TRANSITION  ON  DEMAND  GROWTH  DYNAMICS, OECD MEMBERS STILL ARE THE BIGGEST OIL‐CONSUMING COUNTRIES 10% Saudi Arabia 8% China 6% Annual Oil Demand Growth, Brazil India 2005‐2010 (%) 4% Iran Russia 2% Canada France Annual GDP Growth,  Mexico Korea 2005‐2010 (%) 0% ‐2% 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% USA ‐2% United Kingdom Germany Spain ‐4% Italy Biggest Oil‐Consuming Countries – 2010 Japan ‐6%Source: PIRA Note: each circle represents the relative size of each country’s oil demand. 5
  6. 6. THE REGION HOLDS SUFFICIENT NATURAL RESOURCES TO THE SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION OF FOOD AND BIOFUELSMain Biofuels Producers and Government Programs Brazil ‐ Production (billion liters) Biodiesel 28 28 Mexico and Caribbean  Ethanol 26 Production (billion liters) 0.4 0.5 0.6 Costa Rica‐ max E8; B2 23 2008 2009 2010 Panama E10 Colombia Ecuador 18 B2,5; E10 E8, B8 Colombia ‐ Production (billion liters) Peru – B2 Brazil B5; 2011‐ B5; E7‐E8 E20 0.3 0.3 0.4 Bolivia – B2,5 0.2 2015‐ B20 2008 2009 2010 Argentina 2010 ‐ B7; E3 Argentina ‐ Production (billion liters) 2011/ 2012‐ B10; E5 Paraguay 2.2 B5; E18‐E24 0.8 1.4 0.3 Uruguay 0.4 2012: B5 2010 2015: E5 1.6 2.4 2007 2008 2009 1.2 0.4 Chile – B2‐B5 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 E2‐E5 • Biofuels industry contributes to the rural sector development and  to employment generation; • In  Brazil,  agro‐ecological  zones  delimit  the  areas  for  soy,  cane,  and palm. From the 7% of feasible and authorized area available  to the production of cane in Brazil, only 1% is used.Source: consolidated data based on various sources (ADP Renewables, ÚNICA, ANP and others) 6
  7. 7. ASIA,  LATIN  AMERICA  AND  MIDDLE  EAST  HAVE  THE  LARGEST  PROJECTS  OF NEW REFINERIES AND CAPACITY EXPANSIONS Refining Capacity additions (2011‐2016) (Totals in kbpd) 4000 3500 New Refineries 3.204 3000 Expansions 2500 2000 1.997 1.755 1500 1000 736 703 500 437 153 0 Asia Middle East North Latin America Europe Former Soviet Africa America Union• The new refineries have large scale, high complexity and are fully prepared to process heavy crudes. Most of them  are  focused  in  maximizing  low  sulfur  distillates,  objective  achieved  through  the  use  of  delayed  coking  and  hydrocracking units. Source: Pira, Petrobras, 2011 7
  8. 8. ALTHOUGH  THE  MAIN  EXPECTED  REFINING  PROJECTS  IN  THE  WORLD  ARE  EXPORT‐ ORIENTED,  IN  LATIN  AMERICA  AND  IN  ASIA,  THE  LARGEST  PROJECTS  ARE ORIENTED  TO THE DOMESTIC MARKET.  Main capacity expansion projects in the world 2011‐2016 (kbpd) North America Russia and Europe 400 Asia 180 325 180 200 140 300 75 200 2011 2012 2013 2011 2014 2016 PBF Energy Shell  & Valero Tatneft Rosneft Turcas & Aramco Socar 2012/16 2014 2015 Petrochina IndianOil Petro Vietnam Middle East Latin America 375 400 580 300 Africa 178 182 110 20 2013 2014 2015 2012 2016 2013/14/ Aramco &  Iran Oil Aramco &  2013/14 2013/15 Petrochina Sonangol Total Sinopec 15 Ecopetrol PDVSA Petrobras Project Starting YearSource: Pira, Petrobras, 2011 8
  9. 9. SOUTH AMERICA IS NOT A MAIN SHIPPING ROUTE, BUT IT WILL INCREASE ITS OIL EXPORTS. ASIA WILL BECOME A MAJOR OIL CONSUMER, LIKE EUROPE AND NORTH AMERICA Balance of Oil (Exports / - Imports) MM BPD 2009 2020 40 30 20 10 0 2,2 -10 0,7 1,9 1,9 0,4 -20 Asia (non- Caspian and Africa China Europe Others Middle East America (incl.Mexico) North Am. Latin China) 0,2 Russia 0,7 1,2 0,2 0,3 0,4 1,8 0,3 1,40,1 9,5 1,6 0,5 3,0 0,4 1,0 0,5 0,6 1,4 1,7 Major world oil flows (MMBpd - 2009) 9 Source: PIRA (Maps). IEA/WEO 2010 (Graphs) 9
  10. 10. FSU STAYS AS A MAJOR EXPORTER OF DIESEL AND FUEL OIL. NON‐CHINESE ASIA INCREASES ITS IMPORTS OF OIL PRODUCTS. 150 720 300 50 10 320 140 100 240 30 370 230 540 5 10 40 30 200 65 10 100 20 130 140 80 60 60 10 110 250 70 170 60 130 200 130 Main Products Net Exports/(Imports) kBPD 1600 110 160 1200 800 200 400 Major world oil product 0 -400 Gasoline Diesel/Gasoil Jet Fuel Oil flows (MMBpd - 2009) -800 -1200 USA and Latin Europe Middle Africa FSU China Asia Canada America East (without China) 2010 2020 Source: PIRA (Maps). PETROBRAS (Graphs) 10
  11. 11. WITH  NEW  REFINING  IN  ASIA,  LONG‐HAUL*  CRUDE  ROUTES  BECOME  MORE  RELEVANT TOWARDS THE EAST, BUT LONG‐HAUL ROUTES FOR PRODUCTS MAY WEAKEN • Tonne miles more than tripled to China, while seaborne  imports  just  doubled.  Its  fast  growth  demanded  fast  diversification  of  sources  from  even  more  distant  places.  • China’s  strong  imports  also  pressure  other  Asian  countries to diversify their imports. • India  also  demands  new  sources,  diversifying  imports  to further regions, such as West Africa. • New  refining  in  Asia/Pacific  implies  in  less  needs  of  long‐haul  imports  of  products,  but  some  long‐haul  exports  may  remain,  from  India  and  Arabian  Gulf  to  Million DWT Europe or to the US. 500 Estimated Tanker Demand 400 Vessels above 300 200,000 dwt 200 Vessels under 100 200,000 dwt 0 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 * Long‐haul = more than 5,000 Nautical Miles 11 • Clarkson Research, February 2011
  12. 12. THE  INDIAN  OCEAN  IS  EVER  MORE  CRITICAL  TO  OIL  AND  PRODUCTS  SHIPPING There are strategic risks in the strait of malacca and piracy in the gulf of adenChina plans to reduce its dependency on the Malacca Strait, but volumes shipped through the  strait will remain high • Myanmar oil pipeline  (2013/2014): 440  kbpd • Kazakhstan‐China oil  pipeline (2013): 400  kbpd • Russia‐China oil  pipeline (Present: 300  kbpd; expansion by  2015: 600 kbpd) • Total from pipeline  options: 1440 kbpd,  are only 23% of  expected imports  from China (2015) – 6400 kbpd (IEA  2010) Map: Current and future routes for China´s oil and natural gas imports (IEA 2011) 12
  13. 13. WORLD DEMAND FOR OIL GLOBAL LIQUIDS DEMAND 120 Scenario: Business as Usual 10 1 Capacity addition required 100 2020 43 48 MM bpd 90 Scenario: Sustainable Development 2030 65 78 MM bpd 80 Challenges of 70 Existing production supply • Incorporation of new discoveries(Em MM bpd) 60 50 Project decline in • Alternatives energy the production source 40 30 • Increase of energy efficiency 20 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 •increases to Oil in Place or recovery factor o Perspectives: investments in oil production will be necessary Source: IEA World Energy Outlook 2010, EIA International Energy Outlook 2010 13
  14. 14. INTEGRATED VALUE CHAIN Business Plan 2010‐2014 US$ 224.1 Bn Opportunities: 2%1%2%1% Economic Growth 8% Internacional Geopolitical stability E&P 5% RTM Hydrocarbon potential G&P Biofuels Petroquímica Challenges: Marketing 53% Critical resources (goods and Biofuels 33% Corporative Brasil services, human resources) 95% Financing Energy Integration Our main lines: Key Statistics and market position (2010) Exploration and  RTM (incl.  Retail Gas and Power International Biofuels Production Petrochemicals)• 15.3 Bn boe of  • 12 refineries • 7,306  service • 14,246 km of  • 25 countries • 3 new biodiesel 1P(SPE) stations pipelines • 0.7 Bn boe of 1P(SPE) plants • 2.0 mm bbl/d  • 245 mil boed of • 2.3 mm boed •38.8% market share •Participation in 20 of • Ethanol: new refining capacity productionproduction 27 discos of gas in  markets • 11.2 mm t/y  Brazil • 281 mil bbl/d refining•98.5%  of brazilian • Responsible for capacityproduction nominal  • 5,944 MW of  10% of brazilian petrochemical Electricity Generation •Petrochemical, Gas  ethanol exports.• 20% of deepwater capacity2) and Power activitiesproduction capacity Note: (1) Includes Corporative and Elimination; (2) Through Braskem and  Quattor 14
  15. 15. GROWING PRODUCTION FULLY SUPPORTED BY DISCOVERIES Petrobras Total Production (000 b/d) 5,382 R  CAG 4.5% p.y. 7.6% 120 3,907 203 1. 109 128 2,217 2,583 176 1,809 101 623 96 144 22 163 35 334 2 5 2 274 2,980 3,950 1. 5 0 0 1. 6 8 4 2.004 Pre‐Salt 1,078 241 2002 2005 2010 ... 2014 ... 2020 Oil Production - Brazil Gas Production - Brazil Oil Production - International Gas Production - International Petrobras Total Reserves (bln boe) ‐ SPE Criteria 5,000 Higher • 18th consecutive years of fully replacing  Estimates the production (229% in 2010) 9,600 • R/P ratio 18.4 years (SPE Criteria) Lower estimates 8,100 29,000‐31,000 14,913 15,986 12,131Proven Reserves 2002 Proven Reserves 2005 Proven Reserves 2010 Potential Recoverable (Lula,  Transfer of Rights Total Resource Base Cernambi, Iara, Guará and  Whales Park) 15
  16. 16. TRENDS  IN  LATIN  AMERICA  OIL  PRODUCTION  REFLECT  THE  BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT IN EACH COUNTRY 4.0 Latin American Oil Production 6.0 Latin American Gas Production 3.5 5.0 3.0 Arg. Arg. Brazil 4.0 2.5 BoliviaMMb/d Colo. Bcf/d 2.0 Brazil Ecu. 3.0 Peru Colo. 1.5 Trin. 2.0 Trin. 1.0 Ven. Ven. 0.5 Mex. 1.0 Mex. 0.0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 0.0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Source: BP 2010 Statistical  Review Source:  BP 2010 Statistical Review 16
  17. 17. THE ACCESS TO BRAZILIAN E&P Mature Basins New Frontiers/  High Potential Presalt On Hold Source: IHS CERA 17
  18. 18. PRE-SALT SUSTAINABILITY Ex: Commitment to give Local   content environmental friendly destination to the carbon dioxide produced More equipment  from Pre‐Salt reservoirs, ... Expanded  availability supply capacity Increased  flexibility New suppliers Environmental Lower prices Financial Ex: • Lula Pilot breakeven in the US$ 35‐ 45/bbl oil price range. • Consortia sactioned procurement of 13 FPSOs Social Strengthen Brazilian  Create jobs and  Reinforce internal  economy income market 18
  19. 19. TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES Subsea Reservoir • Definition  of  large  reservoir  facies variations  and  fluid  • Qualification  of  flexible  risers  for  water  depth  of  2,200m  contacts from seismic data (7,218 ft), considering CO2 and high pressure • Internal reservoir characterization, with focus on the  • Qualification  of  flexible  flowlines for  high  pressure  gas  • heterogeneities that impact fluid flow Injection (about 8,000 psi) • Secondary recovery: technical feasibility of water injection, • Wax deposition in long pipelines • WAG‐HC and WAG‐CO2 • Feasibility of 4D seismics under the recovery methods • Scaling control • Rock‐fluids interactions: impact on the potential of scale • Temperature management along the subsea lines • precipitation, on geomechanics of the surrounding rocks • Installation and operation of uncoupled rigid risers • Avoid flow concentration in high permeability layers • Improvement of the waterflood performance in mixed wet • Operation  of  satellite  WAG  injection  wells  (avoid  hydrate  • carbonates formation) • Efficient control of inorganic scaling FPUs Drilling and Completion • Construction  of  high  angle  wells,  deviated  into  the  salt  zone• Mooring in water depths of 2,200 m • Definition of the best strategy of well stimulation• Interaction with the riser´s system • Quality of cement jobs and resistance to CO2• Scenario for platforms with direct access to the wells (SPAR,  • Well integrity FPDSO) • Penetration rate in the microbial carbonate reservoir• CO2  separation  facilities;  compression,  compression  for  reinjection • Performance of intelligent completion• Plant modularization for deck space/cargo optimization • New alloys to reduce costs of well materials• Standardization of most systems in the FPSO • New procedures to reduce well drilling and completion • duration • Performance improvement of the new rigs 19
  20. 20. BRAZILIAN DEMAND AND REFINING CAPACITY COMPERJ COMPERJ (1º trem) (2º trem) 165 mil bpd 165 mil bpd (Set-2013) (Jan-2018) Mil bpd Refinaria Abreu e Lima PREMIUM I PREMIUM II (1ª trem) (RNE) 300 mil bpd5.000 300 mil bpd (Dez-2017) 230 mil bpd (Out-2014) (Dez-2012) PREMIUM I (2ª trem)4.000 300 mil bpd (Dez-2016)3.000 4.9102.000 3.224 3.197 3.070 2.479 2.493 2.208 2.147 2.110 2.004 1.971 1.933 1.811 1.792 1.7981.000 0 2009 (*) 2010 (*) 2011 2015 2020 Oil Production Throughput Oil Production Demand (*) Dados do realizado para 2009 e 2010. 20
  21. 21. BIOFUELS TARGETS AND INVESTMENTS 2010‐2014Continued expansion and integration with oil productsStrategyAct globally, on biofuels production, with relevant participation in biodiesel and ethanol bussiness Ethanol Exports Production Capacity of  Ethanol Production Biodiesel in Brazil  2.600 747 1,055 +47% % 3 % +135 Thous. m³/year +19 507 449 886 2010 2014 2010 2014 2010 2014 ETHANOL Ethanol BIO DIESEL INVESTMENTS 2010‐2014: US$ 3.5 Billion • Increase  of  Petrobras  participation  in  Brazils  0,7 ethanol  industry  and  bioenergy;  investments  focus  on  developing  a  new  generation  of  biofuels and cogeneration power: 0,4 2,0 • Acquisition  of  45.7%  of  Guarani,  the  4th  largest processor of sugar cane in the country,  0,4 and agreement to reach a stake of up to 49%; Ethanol Biodiesel R&D Logistics • Acquisition of 40.4% of Usina Total;  • Strategic  partnership  with  Grupo São  Martinho,  creating  a  new  company,  called  Nova Fronteira (49% BR). 21
  22. 22. HUMAN RESOURCES PETROBRAS Time in company (average): 14.6 years Actions in HR 51% 46% Strategic Remuneration 3% Internal  development  and  external attraction 48% Leadership development Age (average): 42 years Knowledge Management Date: February 2011 22
  23. 23. TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT 50 THEMATIC NETWORKS WITH 80 INSTITUTIONS ANP Technical CENPES Scientific Partner Partner(manager) Committee institution 1 institution 5 Partner Partner institution 2 Partner institution 4 MCT institution 3 FINEP CNPq RESEARCH - Physical and Human Infrastructure UNIVERSITIES INSTITUTES - Human Resources Training - R & D Projects SUPPLIERS - Technology Services INCUBATORS 23
  24. 24. DEMANDS OF HUMAN RESOURCES ‐ BUSINESS PLAN 2010‐2014 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Business Plan 2008 – 2012 28 Drilling Rigs 146 Supply Boats New Stationary Production Units Promef II Freight 19 vessels Refinery Premium II Refinery Premium I Comperj and RNEST replanning New projects 78.402 Qualified Professionals 212.638 New Demands BP 2010-14 24
  25. 25. PETROBRAS CHALLENGES Capacity to execute a huge portfolio project Strength and reliability of supply chain Resource management and efficiency Human Resources challenges Funding requirements 25

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