Agile and user story workshop Peter Saddington

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A workshop for better practices in User Story Writing using Agile and Scrum

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  • Stakeholders write user stories – User stories are supposed to be simple, with simple description and acceptance criteria. Use business language. Remember non-functional requirements – Stories can also include a variety of requirement types. Indicate the estimated size – A story should include an estimate effort. The developers currently do this during the iteration planning meetings and can include technical detail. Indicate the priority – We prioritize through the placement of the story. Include a unique identifier – We should include an identifier so we can trace back stories to their original requirements documents and/or project request forms.
  • Stakeholders write user stories – User stories are supposed to be simple, with simple description and acceptance criteria. Use business language. Remember non-functional requirements – Stories can also include a variety of requirement types. Indicate the estimated size – A story should include an estimate effort. The developers currently do this during the iteration planning meetings and can include technical detail. Indicate the priority – We prioritize through the placement of the story. Include a unique identifier – We should include an identifier so we can trace back stories to their original requirements documents and/or project request forms.
  • Stakeholders write user stories – User stories are supposed to be simple, with simple description and acceptance criteria. Use business language. Remember non-functional requirements – Stories can also include a variety of requirement types. Indicate the estimated size – A story should include an estimate effort. The developers currently do this during the iteration planning meetings and can include technical detail. Indicate the priority – We prioritize through the placement of the story. Include a unique identifier – We should include an identifier so we can trace back stories to their original requirements documents and/or project request forms.
  • Stakeholders write user stories – User stories are supposed to be simple, with simple description and acceptance criteria. Use business language. Remember non-functional requirements – Stories can also include a variety of requirement types. Mike Cohn often has said that non-functional requirements should be considered “constraints” on the system or development team. Indicate the estimated size – A story should include an estimate effort. The developers currently do this during the iteration planning meetings and can include technical detail. Indicate the priority – We prioritize through the placement of the story. Include a unique identifier – We should include an identifier so we can trace back stories to their original requirements documents and/or project request forms.
  • Stakeholders write user stories – User stories are supposed to be simple, with simple description and acceptance criteria. Use business language. Remember non-functional requirements – Stories can also include a variety of requirement types. Mike Cohn often has said that non-functional requirements should be considered “constraints” on the system or development team. Indicate the estimated size – A story should include an estimate effort. The developers currently do this during the iteration planning meetings and can include technical detail. Indicate the priority – We prioritize through the placement of the story. Include a unique identifier – We should include an identifier so we can trace back stories to their original requirements documents and/or project request forms.
  • Conversation – if requirements are written down, what happens? [the PO will get what he wants?] OR [The PO will get what is written?] – Words are imprecise. The story we write on cards is less important than the conversations we have.
  • Show teams balloon. Acceptance criteria and requirements – I will provide. Built test harnesses, templates, requirement specs Defining acceptance criteria is not the same as writing tests or test cases. Automating acceptance tests can be very helpful The investment in creating better requirements and acceptance criteria is worthwhile and has high return!
  • There are many different ways of gathering user stories. Here are some of them
  • To have a better understanding of prioritization we must look at the MoSCoW method through the lens of Kano’s model of quality Objective quality is the conformance to requirements Subjective Quality pertains to the satisfaction of users
  • To have a better understanding of prioritization we must look at the MoSCoW method through the lens of Kano’s model of quality Objective quality is the conformance to requirements Subjective Quality pertains to the satisfaction of users
  • Why do you want a button? // To go to the next screen Why do you want to go to the next screen? // So I can skip ahead to other parts of the questionnaire Why do you want to skip ahead? // So I can save time on non-required parts… Why do you want to save time on non-required parts? // So I can help more customers in less time.
  • Agile and user story workshop Peter Saddington

    1. 1. Agile with SCRUM Overview and User Stories Peter Saddington, CSM CSP Enterprise Agile Coach Executive Editor AgileScout.com @agilescout
    2. 2. White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington Peter Saddington, CSP CSM Independent Enterprise Agile Coach Rally Software Agile Coach Executive Editor AgileScout.com Author – Scrum Pocket Guide [email_address] +1.404.669.6662 www.agilescout.com www.scrumpocketguide.com Twitter: @agilescout
    3. 3. Before we begin… A Standup! <ul><li>Let’s take a moment to introduce ourselves. </li></ul><ul><li>What’s your name & project you’re working on? </li></ul><ul><li>What is your level of experience with Agile? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you hope to learn in this workshop? </li></ul><ul><li>Write questions on Sticky notes as they occur to you and affix them to our Learning Backlog . </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    4. 4. Free Swag = #win! White Barrel LLC. © 2010 Peter Saddington www.scrumpocketguide.com
    5. 5. Agile Manifesto <ul><li>Individuals and interactions over processes and tools </li></ul><ul><li>Working software over comprehensive documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Customer collaboration over contract negotiation </li></ul><ul><li>Responding to change over following a plan </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington www.agilemanifesto.org
    6. 6. Distilled Principles of Agile Manifesto <ul><li>Priority is to satisfy the customer </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver working software frequently </li></ul><ul><li>Business and development work together </li></ul><ul><li>Working software is primary measure of success </li></ul><ul><li>The team regularly reflects on work </li></ul><ul><li>Build projects around motivated people </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    7. 7. Process Frameworks <ul><li>Waterfall </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    8. 8. Process Frameworks <ul><li>Iterative </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    9. 9. Process Frameworks <ul><li>Agile </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    10. 10. Agile vs Scrum vs Other Frameworks <ul><li>Agile is a mindset, there are several ways to implement Agile: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>XP – Extreme Programming </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DSDM – Dynamic Systems Development Method </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scrum – lightweight team centric processes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lean – Manufacturing processes applied to software </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FDD – Feature centric processes </li></ul></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    11. 11. Scrum <ul><li>Scrum is not an acronym, but a strategy in the game of rugby for getting an out-of-play ball back into play. </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    12. 12. Exercise – Batch vs Flow <ul><li>Four volunteers, please! </li></ul><ul><li>Round 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Each person flips all pennies </li></ul><ul><li>When done with entire batch, pass to next person </li></ul><ul><li>Round 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Each person flip one penny and pass to next person </li></ul><ul><li>Keep flipping and passing until done </li></ul><ul><li>Round 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Each table creates their own rules to maximize penny flow/throughput in least amount of time </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    13. 13. Scrum Rules <ul><li>Scrum is a set of rules, procedures, and practices </li></ul><ul><li>Improve the development environment </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce organizational overheads </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure iterative deliverables match user requirements </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    14. 14. Scrum Approach <ul><li>Work together as a whole team </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on business priorities </li></ul><ul><li>Time box short sprints and releases </li></ul><ul><li>Commit and deliver value incrementally </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    15. 15. <ul><li>The Chicken and the Pig – A Story: </li></ul><ul><li>Bacon and Egg Restaurant </li></ul><ul><li>Chickens involved… </li></ul><ul><li>Pigs are committed! </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    16. 16. How It All Starts <ul><li>A Scrum project starts with a vision of the system or product to be developed </li></ul><ul><li>The vision might be vague at first… </li></ul><ul><li>Perhaps stated in market terms rather than system terms… </li></ul><ul><li>But it will become clearer as the project moves forward </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    17. 17. Scrum Roles <ul><li>Product Owner </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The single customer voice who establishes the vision, prioritizes the work and defines success criteria </li></ul></ul><ul><li>ScrumMaster </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The situational leader who empowers the team, facilitates the process, and removes impediments </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cross-functional team </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The people who deliver the customer value </li></ul></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    18. 18. Scrum Meetings <ul><li>Daily Scrum </li></ul><ul><li>Sprint Planning Meeting </li></ul><ul><li>Sprint Review Meeting* </li></ul><ul><li>Demo </li></ul><ul><li>Sprint Retrospective </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    19. 19. Scrum Artifacts <ul><li>User Stories </li></ul><ul><li>Product Backlog </li></ul><ul><ul><li>List of functional and non-functional requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sprint Backlog </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prioritized list of stories for a given sprint </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sprint Burndown Chart </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A chart showing completion of stories over time </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Definition of done </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    20. 20. The Bottom Line <ul><li>Scrum is: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Doing the simplest thing possible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Getting a team what it needs and getting out of their way </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Removing any obstacle that is preventing a team from being productive and efficient </li></ul></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    21. 21. Final Thoughts <ul><li>The core of Agile is the team </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on the priorities first (most valuable) </li></ul><ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Document throughout the process instead of all up front </li></ul><ul><li>Review, review, review </li></ul><ul><li>Define the “done.” </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    22. 22. User Stories – Better Practices A Quick Guide to Story Creation in Scrum Peter Saddington CSM, CSP Agile Scrum Coach
    23. 23. A Worldview White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    24. 24. Roadmap White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    25. 25. Why Not Requirements Documents? <ul><li>Complete specifications: </li></ul><ul><li>Assume everything is knowable in advance </li></ul><ul><li>Are time-consuming to write and tedious to read </li></ul><ul><li>Treat learning as a “Change of Scope” </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t lend themselves to iterative, incremental delivery process </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    26. 26. User Stories are a Conversation <ul><li>User stories are: </li></ul><ul><li>User or customer need </li></ul><ul><li>Product description </li></ul><ul><li>Used for planning </li></ul><ul><li>A conversation piece </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    27. 27. User Stories Facilitate Conversation <ul><li>User* – How do I describe what I want? </li></ul><ul><li>Stakeholder – What do I need in my product to be successful? </li></ul><ul><li>PM – How do I track and schedule this work? </li></ul><ul><li>BA – What are the details of this feature? </li></ul><ul><li>UX – How do I understand the users needs? </li></ul><ul><li>Developer – What are the details of the tasks I need to work on today? </li></ul><ul><li>QA – How do I validate this completed work? </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Adapted from Jeff Patton www.AgileProductDesign.com
    28. 28. <ul><li>Easy to understand – Makes sense to the reader </li></ul><ul><li>A (software/system) requirement </li></ul><ul><li>One or two sentences with value to the customer </li></ul><ul><li>Written by the Customer – PO or BA </li></ul><ul><li>Refined by Development – Tasks and Technical </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiable – Conversation token </li></ul><ul><li>Small and estimable – Small enough to estimate </li></ul><ul><li>Testable – Should have acceptance criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Becomes more detailed over time – Iteration Planning </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington A User Story Is
    29. 29. White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington User Story Process Step #1 Step #2 Step #3
    30. 30. <ul><li>Define the user personas! </li></ul><ul><li>What different types of customers/consumers interact with the system? </li></ul><ul><li>What are their roles? </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Step #1 - Where do we start?
    31. 31. <ul><li>User Roles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Various types of user personas </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Role Modeling </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Brain storming </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organizing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consolidating </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Refining </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Extreme Characters? </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington User Role Modeling
    32. 32. <ul><li>Scenario : You need to create a simple login and preferences mechanism for your corporate Twitter account </li></ul><ul><li>Who are your users of this system? </li></ul><ul><li>What are their roles? </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Exercise - Defining the Personas
    33. 33. White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Persona Definition Documentation?
    34. 34. Roadmap White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    35. 35. Story Creation - Guidelines <ul><li>Stakeholders write user stories </li></ul><ul><li>Remember non-functional requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Indicate the estimated size </li></ul><ul><li>Indicate the priority </li></ul><ul><li>Include a unique identifier (if applicable) </li></ul><ul><li>Go into a product backlog </li></ul><ul><li>The product backlog is prioritized by value – Highest to lowest </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    36. 36. Non-Functional Requirements <ul><li>Non-functional requirements should often be considered “constraints” on a system </li></ul><ul><li>Can include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accuracy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Portability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reusability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintainability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interoperability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Capacity </li></ul></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Adapted from Mike Cohn www.mountaingoatsoftware.com
    37. 37. INVEST Model <ul><li>I ndependent – One user story should be independent of another (as much as possible). Dependencies between stories make planning, prioritization, and estimation much more difficult. </li></ul><ul><li>N egotiable – Details of the story can be worked out during an Iteration planning meeting. A story with too much detail can limit conversations (at times). </li></ul><ul><li>V aluable – Value to the customer. </li></ul><ul><li>E stimable – There needs to be enough detail for the developers to estimate a user story to allow prioritization and planning of the story. </li></ul><ul><li>S mall – A good story should be small in effort, typically no more than 2-3 person weeks of effort (smaller is better)! </li></ul><ul><li>T estable – User stories should be testable with certain acceptance criteria. Saying something like “software should be easy to use” is not helpful. </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Bill Wake’s INVEST Model
    38. 38. Ron Jeffries 3 C’s <ul><li>Card – Stories written on note cards with annotations as needed (estimates, notes, etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Conversation – Details behind story come out through conversations with the Product Owner </li></ul><ul><li>Confirmation – Acceptance tests confirm the story was coded correctly </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    39. 39. Four Main Components of a Story <ul><li>( Given ( AS A ) ) – “As a business owner…” / “Given a new list…” </li></ul><ul><li>( When ( I WANT ) ) – “I’d like the ability to…” / “We need a function to…” / “When a customer clicks on…” / “When a dropdown opens…” </li></ul><ul><li>( Then ( SO THAT ) ) – “So that I can…” / “So that the customer can…” / “Then the customer should see…” / “Then the dropdown list should…” </li></ul><ul><li>( Acceptance Criteria ) – Verifiable and testable criteria that can be tested based on THEN clause. </li></ul><ul><li>Or Simply: “As a <user type>, I want to <function> so that I can <business value> </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    40. 40. 1. Given <ul><li>( Given ( AS A ) ) – “As a business owner…” / “Given a new list…” </li></ul><ul><li>We want users to be tangible with needs </li></ul><ul><li>Build out “Personas” or “User Roles” – Standard user definitions (Sacred – Added with purpose) </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid generic terms </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    41. 41. 2. When <ul><li>( When ( I WANT ) ) – “I’d like the ability to…” / “We need a function to…” / “When a customer clicks on…” / “When a dropdown opens…” </li></ul><ul><li>This is the meat and potatoes of the story </li></ul><ul><li>This is where you describe the functions </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    42. 42. 3. Then <ul><li>( Then ( SO THAT ) ) – “So that I can…” / “So that the customer can…” / “Then the customer should see…” / “Then the dropdown list should…” </li></ul><ul><li>This is to show the intrinsic value of the story </li></ul><ul><li>The value is to the persona, user, or author </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    43. 43. 4. Acceptance Criteria <ul><li>( Acceptance Criteria ) – Verifiable and testable criteria that can be tested based on THEN clause. </li></ul><ul><li>These are essentially tests – Conditions of satisfaction </li></ul><ul><li>Example: As a user, I can cancel a reservation. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Verify that a premium member can cancel </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Verify that a email confirmation is sent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Verify that the hotel is notified of any cancelation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>These acceptance criteria can become developer tasks </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    44. 44. 4a. Acceptance Stories <ul><li>( Acceptance Stories ) – Verifiable and testable criteria written in acceptance test form. </li></ul><ul><li>Scenario 1: TITLE </li></ul><ul><ul><li>GIVEN [context] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>And [some more context] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When [event] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Then [outcome] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>And [another outcome] </li></ul></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    45. 45. 4b. Acceptance Confirmation <ul><li>( Acceptance Confirmation ) – Verifiable and testable criteria written in “Success” and “Failure” terms </li></ul><ul><li>Success – valid user logged in </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Remember my user name” selected – store cookie / automatic login next time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Remember my user name” not selected – force login next time </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Failure – display message: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Email address in wrong format” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Incorrect password, please try again” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Service unavailable, please try again” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Etc. </li></ul></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    46. 46. Exercise – 99 Balloons <ul><li>Let’s form some teams! </li></ul><ul><li>Round 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Recreate my balloon with: 2 round eyes, a triangle nose, and a semi-circle mouth </li></ul><ul><li>2 minutes! Go! </li></ul><ul><li>Round 2 </li></ul><ul><li>How can you improve for the next iteration? </li></ul><ul><li>Round 3 </li></ul><ul><li>How did you change how you worked this time around? </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2011 Peter Saddington
    47. 47. <ul><li>User Interviews </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Select right interviewees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask open-ended, context-free questions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Questionnaires </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Larger population of users </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When you need specific answers to questions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Observation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Best for in-house developments </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Story writing workshops </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Step #2 – Gathering User Stories
    48. 48. <ul><li>Scenario : You need to create a simple login and preferences mechanism for your corporate Twitter account </li></ul><ul><li>We’ve determined our users… </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s refine the set of user stories </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Exercise – Refine the User Stories
    49. 49. Roadmap White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    50. 50. Product Backlog to Release Backlog <ul><li>A prioritized list of features for the given product </li></ul><ul><li>Stories are implemented based on their priority </li></ul><ul><li>The TOP priority Features are put into iterations first </li></ul><ul><li>Changes to the iterations are OK </li></ul><ul><li>After stories are built they go into a release backlog </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2010 Peter Saddington
    51. 51. Prioritization Factors to Consider <ul><li>Financial value of features </li></ul><ul><li>Costs of implementation </li></ul><ul><li>Amount of risk removed / added </li></ul><ul><li>Training on new features </li></ul><ul><li>PO should be enabled </li></ul>White Barrel LLC. © 2010 Peter Saddington
    52. 52. MoSCoW Method <ul><li>M – MUST have (Critical for success) </li></ul><ul><li>S – SHOULD have if possible (If not time critical) </li></ul><ul><li>C – COULD have if it does not affect anything else (Include if little development cost) </li></ul><ul><li>W – WON’T have this time, but WOULD like in future </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington MoSCoW method - Dai Clegg of Oracle UK for DSDM
    53. 53. M & S of MoSCoW <ul><li>M – MUST have (Critical for success) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Essential - key stakeholders needs will not be satisfied if this requirement is not delivered and the timebox will be considered to have failed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>S – SHOULD have if possible (If not time critical) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Important - but if not delivered within the current timebox, there is an acceptable workaround until it is delivered during the next sprint </li></ul></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    54. 54. C & W of MoSCoW <ul><li>C – COULD have if it does not affect anything else (Include if little development cost) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Nice to have” – this is estimated to be possible to complete in the timebox but will be de-scoped if an underestimation has occured </li></ul></ul><ul><li>W – WON’T have this time, but WOULD like in future </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Will not be delivered within the timebox </li></ul></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    55. 55. Kano’s Model of Quality <ul><li>Objective and Subjective Quality </li></ul><ul><li>Must-haves – Same as “M” in MoSCoW </li></ul><ul><li>One-dimensional – “The more of this I get, the better.” </li></ul><ul><li>Delighters – Great to haves </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Noriaki Kano – Theory of Product Development
    56. 56. Kano’s Model - Example <ul><li>In Agile – Objective quality is non-negotiable </li></ul><ul><li>Subjective quality – Perception of quality </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To accurately assess subjective quality, the Product Owner MUST know the customers (primary users) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One user’s “delighter” may leave others apathetic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One user’s “must have” is useless to others </li></ul></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Jeff Paton – www.Agileproductdesign.com
    57. 57. Prioritization Sliders White Barrel LLC. © 2010 Peter Saddington
    58. 58. <ul><li>Manage the backlog by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sorting stories by user persona </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sorting stories by highest priority (value) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review stories for completeness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Asking the 4 “WHYs” for business value </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Why do you want…? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>[As a] Customer Service Representative </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>[I want] to have a button </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>[So that] I can go to the next screen… </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Step #3 – A.C. and Backlog Priority
    59. 59. <ul><li>Scenario : You need to create a simple login and preferences mechanism for your corporate Twitter account </li></ul><ul><li>We’ve determined our users… </li></ul><ul><li>We’ve refined the set of user stories </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s put A.C. and priority </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Exercise – Stories to Backlog
    60. 60. Roadmap White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    61. 61. Themes to Tasks White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    62. 62. Tasks Warm Up Exercise <ul><li>What are all the things you did to get ready to be at work today? </li></ul><ul><li>Starting from the moment you woke up to arriving here. </li></ul><ul><li>Take a sheet of paper and write them down! </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    63. 63. Tasks vs Tools Exercise <ul><li>Share with the group some example lists </li></ul><ul><li>What are common themes and tasks? </li></ul><ul><li>What was different? </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    64. 64. Goals, Tasks, Tools White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    65. 65. User Stories are Tasks or Tools White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    66. 66. Stories Satisfy User NEEDS First! White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    67. 67. <ul><li>Start with specific personas </li></ul><ul><li>Write closed stories first </li></ul><ul><li>Write stories collaboratively </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington Simple Guidelines for Good Stories
    68. 68. Exercise – Creating at a Story <ul><li>Ta ke a current feature your team is aware of </li></ul><ul><li>Each team member writes the story </li></ul><ul><li>Share </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss – Implications / Constraints / Missed AC </li></ul><ul><li>Review </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    69. 69. Roadmap White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    70. 70. Epic User Stories <ul><li>Causes for Story Size </li></ul><ul><li>Stories cover too much information </li></ul><ul><li>Story writers do not have the needed domain knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Stories have uncertainty due to dependence on new technology </li></ul><ul><li>Story writers cannot articulate exactly what they want </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    71. 71. Breaking Up Epics <ul><li>Split – Slice stories up into different scenarios </li></ul><ul><li>Spike – Too many unknowns? Time-box a spike and take a deep dive into the technology or domain </li></ul><ul><li>Stub – Part of a story known and part unknown. Fake it with a stub! Work on the known part up till the unknown. </li></ul><ul><li>Time box – The PO knows they need something, but until they get it, not sure if it’s right </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    72. 72. Splitting for Value - Three Rules <ul><li>When breaking down epics, remember: </li></ul><ul><li>Split stories for value – No value? Hard to prioritize </li></ul><ul><li>Split a story that gets you more equally sized small stories </li></ul><ul><li>Split an epic that lets you deprioritize or throw away a story </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    73. 73. Exercise – Breaking Up Epics <ul><li>Let’s take an example from our existing backlog </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    74. 74. Suggestions for Splitting Up Epics <ul><li>Handle empty scenarios and core functions first </li></ul><ul><li>Happy path, then alternate flows / exceptions </li></ul><ul><li>Single option, then add additional options </li></ul><ul><li>Simple (or no) UI, then add bells / whistles </li></ul><ul><li>Transient case (no memory between sessions) before persistence </li></ul><ul><li>Static elements, then dynamic based on content </li></ul><ul><li>User specified, then more automation </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    75. 75. Roadmap White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    76. 76. Notes on Bug or Issue Tracking <ul><li>Steps to Reproduce / Recreate the Bug </li></ul><ul><li>Actual Results </li></ul><ul><li>Expected Results </li></ul><ul><li>Any other details as appropriate </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    77. 77. Exercise – Baseline Story Estimation <ul><li>Different Stories in different sizes (1,2,3,5,8…) </li></ul><ul><li>What was the estimated size? </li></ul><ul><li>What were the complexities of that story? </li></ul><ul><li>Does this story need a re-write? What was missed? </li></ul><ul><li>Complete for sizes </li></ul>White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington
    78. 78. Questions? White Barrel LLC © 2010 Peter Saddington

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