The College Classroom Week 5: Fixed and growth mindsets and assessments that support learning

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The College Classroom
collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu
Peter Newbury
Fall 2013

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The College Classroom Week 5: Fixed and growth mindsets and assessments that support learning

  1. 1. on target by hans_s on flickr CC-BY-ND
  2. 2. Week 5: Fixed vs. growth mindset and assessments that support learning The College Classroom October 29 and 31, 2013
  3. 3. Vocabulary Check: Mindsets [1] 3 Fixed, Entity, Performance-oriented The helpless [children] believe that intelligence is a fixed trait: you have only a certain amount, and that’s that. I call this a ‘fixed mind-set.’ collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd Growth, Malleable, Incremental, Mastery- oriented The mastery-oriented children think intelligence is malleable and can be developed through education and hard work.
  4. 4. 4 collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd Graphic by Nigel Holmes [2]
  5. 5. 5 collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd Graphic by Nigel Holmes [2]
  6. 6. 6 collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd Graphic by Nigel Holmes [2]
  7. 7. 7 collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd Graphic by Nigel Holmes [2]
  8. 8. 8 collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd Graphic by Nigel Holmes [2]
  9. 9. 9 collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd Graphic by Nigel Holmes [2]
  10. 10. Agency “Human agency is the capacity for human beings to make choices. It is normally contrasted to natural forces, which are causes involving only unthinking deterministic processes.” Wikipedia en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agency_(philosophy) 10 collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd Graphic by Nigel Holmes [2]
  11. 11. We’ve all been there… 11 When have you encountered a fixed or growth mindset, in yourself or someone you know? 2-minute Think, Pair, Share collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  12. 12. Fixed vs. growth mindset influences… 12  …how we react to feedback: fixed mindset growth mindset criticism ? ? praise ? ?  …our motivation to engage in deliberate practice collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  13. 13. Feedback and Practice that Enhance Learning (How Learning Works) 13 When Practice Does Not Make Perfect… Students’ writing in public policy course They Just Do Not Listen! Students’ presentations in medical anthropology course The instructors don’t recognize their own expertize, fail to give useful practice and feedback. “expert blindness” “curse of knowledge” collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  14. 14. Feedback and Practice that Enhance Learning (How Learning Works) 14 Solution: Goal-directed practice coupled with targeted feedback are critical to learning. [3] Images: Excellent Shot by Varsity Life on flickr CC Music by Piulet on flickr CC collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  15. 15. Feedback and Practice that Enhance Learning (How Learning Works) 15 Solution: Goal-directed practice coupled with targeted feedback are critical to learning. [3] [G]oals can direct the nature of focused practice, provide the basis for evaluating observed performance, and shape the targeted feedback that guides students’ future efforts. [p. 127] [T]argeted feedback gives students prioritized information about how their performance does or does not meet the criteria so they can understand how to improve their future performance. [p. 141] collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  16. 16. Scenarios 16 InPowerful tool for yet, find 2 others with the a moment but not practicing analysis: as you. Together, think of same colored sheet contrasting cases examples/scenarios of both cases, in sports/hobbies and in teaching and learning. feedback at feedback not at appropriate level appropriate level productive practice unproductive practice practice is goal-directed practice not goal-directed timely feedback untimely feedback collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  17. 17. teaching and learning sport/hobby Feedback at Appropriate Level Feedback not at Appropriate Level
  18. 18. teaching and learning sport/hobby Productive Practice Unproductive Practice
  19. 19. teaching and learning sport/hobby Practice Goal-directed Practice not Goal-directed
  20. 20. teaching and learning sport/hobby Timely Feedback Untimely Feedback
  21. 21. Instructional Scaffolding 21  Needs to be given BEFORE and BUILT INTO assignment    Outlines what it takes to improve Supports Zone of Proximal Development [6] (“reasonable yet challenging goal” [2]) James Paul Gee [5] “What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy” angrybirds.com collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  22. 22. Clicker question: Wait, what is this? A) a rubric B) a grading scheme C) I have another name for it 22 collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  23. 23. Clicker question 23 Does this grading scheme foster a A) fixed mindset (“performance-oriented”) B) growth mindset (“mastery-oriented”) C) neither D) both collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  24. 24. Teaching Statement Rubric Excellent Needs Work Goals for student learning Enactment of goals (teaching method) Assessment of goals (measuring student learning) Creating an inclusive learning environment Structure, rhetoric and language 24 collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd Weak
  25. 25. Instructional Scaffolding: Rubrics 25  support growth mindsets  path to improvement  goal-directed [G]oals can direct the nature of focused practice, provide the basis for evaluating observed performance, and shape the targeted feedback that guides students’ future efforts.  targeted feedback [T]argeted feedback gives students prioritized information about how their performance does or does not meet the criteria so they can understand how to improve their future performance. collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  26. 26. Assessment Strategies… 26  addressing the need for goal-directed practice  addressing the need for targeted feedback Work on the hand-out, thinking about what you’ve experienced or what you aspire to do in your field. collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  27. 27. Take Away 27  Plan your course (learning outcomes, assessments and activities) learning outcomes What should students learn? What are students learning? What instructional approaches help students learn? collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd assessment Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative cwsei.ubc.ca
  28. 28. Take Away 28  Plan your course (learning outcomes, assessments and activities)  Motivation and Expertise  growth mindset is necessary for deliberate practice, development of expertise  How YOU behave in the classroom   rewarding errors, etc. take care to support and be sensitive to minority experiences collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  29. 29. Mindset for your students 29 You must foster a growth mindset in your students. collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  30. 30. Department-wide email from faculty member in Department of , 30 "Our discussions on undergraduate education seem to focus mostly on where we want students to be and how to teach to get them there. In my view, this ignores an important dimension, namely the raw intellectual quality of a student and the fact that this varies hugely across our student body. This creates intrinsic limitations. “Our discussions seem to assume that we can, in principle, teach all students all things, if we have the right methods. In my view, every student has an inherent intellectual range, and the best we can do is push them to the top of this range. This range varies enormously from student to student. Some students will never understand the difference between a ________________ and a ____________ and there isn't anything to do about it. “If the goal of education is to enable each student to realize their potential, we need to appreciate the vast differences in these potentials." collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  31. 31. Mindset for your students and you 31 You must foster a growth mindset in your students. You must have a growth mindset about your students’ ability to learn. collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd
  32. 32. References 32 1. Dweck, C.S. (2007). The Secret to Raising Smart Kids. Scientific American, 18, 6, 36-43. 2. Nigel Holmes http://nigelholmes.com/home.htm 3. Ambrose, S.A., Bridges, M.W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M.C., & Norman, M.K. (2010). How Learning Works. San Fransisco: Jossey-Bass. 4. Glued to Games: How Video Games Draw Us In and Hold Us Spellbound http://www.gluedtogames.com/ 5. Gee, J.P. (2005). Learning by Design: good video games as learning machines. E-Learning 2, 1, 5-16. 6. Wertsch, J.V. (1984). The zone of proximal development: Some conceptual issues. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 1984, 23, 7–18. collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu #tccucsd

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