Spring 2008

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Spring 2008

  1. 1. CEAS Events list, Spring 2008 Thursday, January 24, 11 a.m. – WUN Contemporary China Center Video Seminar 227 Pyle Center, 702 Langdon Street China, North Korea & the Emerging Security Order in Northeast Asia Professor Steph Haggard, Graduate School of International Relations & Pacific Studies, University of California, San Diego This is the ninth in a series of video-conferenced seminars linking universities in Europe and the U.S., hosted on campus by CEAS. There is a time for Q&A via video-conferencing at the end of the lecture. Faculty, graduate and undergraduate students are welcome to attend any and all of this series. For more information on this World University Network (WUN) series, see www.wun.ac.uk/chinacenter/. Thursday, January 31, 11 a.m. – WUN Contemporary China Center Video Seminar 227 Pyle Center, 702 Langdon Street The Internet & Mobile Phones in Rural China Dr. Rachel Murphy, University of Bristol This is the tenth in a series of video-conferenced seminars linking universities in Europe and the U.S., hosted on campus by CEAS. There is a time for Q&A via video-conferencing at the end of the lecture. Faculty, graduate and undergraduate students are welcome to attend any and all of this series. For more information on this World University Network (WUN) series, see www.wun.ac.uk/chinacenter/. Monday, February 4, 4:00pm – EALL Guest Lecture 114 Van Hise Hall, 1220 Linden Dr. “Full Limited Animation” Thomas Lamarre, Professor of East Asian Studies and Art History & Communication, McGill University The distinction between full animation and limited animation is central in the study of animation, and accounts of Japanese animation frequently characterize anime as a distinctive form of limited animation that began in earnest with the production of animated television series in the early 1960s. The full/limited distinction is useful, yet certain problems arise. First, historically, there has been a tendency to think of full animation as the art of animation, and to depict limited animation as an artistically limited and even failed version of full animation. On the scene of Japanese animation today, Studio Ghibli in particular pushes such connotations, insisting that the works of its directors, such as Takahata Isao and Miyazaki Hayao, are not anime but manga eiga or manga films. The result is an entrenched opposition between feature-length full animation films (manga film) and animated television series (anime). Establishing an opposition between full and limited animation has the unfortunate effect of eliminating the history of dialogue and exchange between different ways of making animation, in favor of a simple valorization of full animation as Studio Ghibli currently conceives of it. I will look at Studio Ghibli’s distinction between manga film and anime and then explore the hyper-limited animation associated with director Anno Hideaki’s work at Gainax Studios, in order to rethink ‘full limited animation.’ Co-Sponsored by the Dept. of East Asian Languages and Lit.,the University Lectures Committee, and the Center for East Asian Studies at UW-Madison Thursday, February 7, 11 a.m. – WUN Contemporary China Center Video Seminar 227 Pyle Center, 702 Langdon Street Vulnerability to Environmental Change, Linking Local Cases with Global Models Dr. Evan Fraser, University of Leeds
  2. 2. This is the eleventh in a series of video-conferenced seminars linking universities in Europe and the U.S., hosted on campus by CEAS. There is a time for Q&A via video-conferencing at the end of the lecture. Faculty, graduate and undergraduate students are welcome to attend any and all of this series. For more information on this World University Network (WUN) series, see www.wun.ac.uk/chinacenter/. Thursday, February 7th, 5:30-7:30pm 494 Van Hise Hall Modern Korea: Literary and Cinematic Film Screening “My Heart” (Chŏng, 2000, 114 min) directed by Pae Ch’ang-ho This film is an epic drama that spans half a century in which ‘Sunyi’ struggles through every stage of her life against the devastating conditions under the burgeoning modernization of Korea. She eventually finds the meaning of life through ‘Dori,’ who becomes her companion in her tumultuous voyage of life. Although intended for the students taking the course, it is open the public and everyone is welcome. They are free and you are free to participate in a short discussion session after each screening. The sessions will run most of Thursdays throughout the semester at the same time and venue and an announcement will be made beforehand each week. Contact Prof. Taik Kim, tkkim3@wisc.edu, if you have any questions. Friday, February 8th, 3-5pm 8417 Social Sciences Building Epidemiology, Social Sciences and the Spread of HIV/AIDS in China M. Giovanna Merli, Associate Professor of Sociology at UW-Madison University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Sociology announces the 2008 William H. Sewell Memorial Lecture! M. Giovanna Merli received a Ph.D. in Demography from the University of Pennsylvania. An Associate Professor of Sociology and affiliate of the Center for Demography and Ecology and the Center for East Asian Studies, Professor Merli’s interests have been centered on the demography of China and Southeast Asia, fertility and population policies in Asia, and the global impact of HIV/AIDS. At Wisconsin, she teaches courses in demography, contemporary Chinese society and population and health issues in an international/comparative perspective. Reception immediately follows lecture. Sponsored by the Department of Sociology at UW-Madison Tuesday, February 12, 4:00-5:30pm 5243 Mosse Humanities Building (Curti Lounge) "Can Schools be Hijacked?: High School Life on the Eve of South Korea's April Revolution (1960)" Dr. Charles Kim, Yale University Sponsored by the Department of History at the UW-Madison Wednesday, February 13, 12-1:15pm – East Asian Studies in the UW System Brown Bag Series 336 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Dr. “Making Heroes out of Losers: Creating Meiji Restoration History in Local Japan” Michael Wert, Assistant Professor of Japanese History, Marquette University Sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies Thursday, February 14, 11 a.m. – WUN Contemporary China Center Video Seminar 227 Pyle Center, 702 Langdon Street
  3. 3. Globalization, China & Post-1997 Hong Kong Cinema Professor Poshek Fu, University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign This is the last and twelfth in a series of video-conferenced seminars linking universities in Europe and the U.S., hosted on campus by CEAS. There is a time for Q&A via video- conferencing at the end of the lecture. Faculty, graduate and undergraduate students are welcome to attend any and all of this series. For more information on this World University Network (WUN) series, see www.wun.ac.uk/chinacenter/. Thursday, February 14, 4:30-6:00pm 5243 Mosse Humanities Building (Curti Lounge) "The Print Industry in Early Korea" Dr. Michael Shin, Cornell University Sponsored by the Department of History at UW-Madison Monday, February 18, 7:30-9:00pm ATT Lounge, The Pyle Center, 702 Langdon St. “Are China’s and India's Growth Miracles Built to Last?” Eswar Prasad, Trade Policy, Cornell University; former Chief of the Financial Studies Division in the IMF’s Research Department. Sponsored by WAGE, La Follette School of Public Affairs, CIBER, Global Studies, WI Department of Agriculture, and Trade and Consumer Protection. Thursday, February 21st, Noon – 1 p.m. 336 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Drive Undergraduate Student Information Session Come and find out about a major and certificate in East Asian Studies, as well as study abroad and scholarship opportunities! Pizza will be provided. You must RSVP by Wednesday, February 20th so we can have enough pizza on hand! To RSVP, please email: eastudentadvising@eastasia.wisc.edu Thursday, February 21, 2008 The ROBERT F. AND JEAN E. HOLTZ CENTER FOR SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY STUDIES at the University of WIsconsinMadison Visiting Speaker Series presents MIMI ITO, Research Scientist at the Annenberg Center for Communication, University of Southern California & Visiting Associate Professor, Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University with two talks: 12:00pm 1:30pm in 8108 Social Science STS Brownbag "A Conversation with Mimi Ito" & 3:30pm in 8417 Social Science Public Lecture "The Social Life of Mobile Media" (Reception to follow) Lecture Abstract: In the past decade, portable, handheld media and communication devices have become a pervasive fixture of everyday life in Japan. In the form of mobile phones, portable media players, digital cash cards, and portable games, people carry digital media devices on their bodies and in their bags as mediators of their social or financial identities and mechanisms for carving out personal media spaces. This talk will reflect on ongoing ethnographic fieldwork on
  4. 4. the use of portable media in urban Japan, drawing from studies of portable gaming, mobile text messaging, digital photography, and digital cash and reward card use. The evolving relationship between people, portable media, and urban space provides a window into how digital media and networks are being layered onto experiences of urban space, and have become a fixture in everyday social practices and communication. The use of portable digital media is an example of how people, at least in urban Japan, are increasingly inhabiting an environment that is simultaneously local/physical and networked/virtual in nature. Monday, February 25th, 4:00 p.m. – CEAS Guest Lecture 5120 Grainger Hall, 975 University Ave. "Emotional Infectivity: Cyborg Affect and the Limits of the Human" Sharalyn Orbaugh, Associate Professor, Asian Studies and Women & Gender Studies, University of British Columbia This presentation explores the question: can an android love and be loved? Or, to put the emphasis differently: is love possible only for humans, or are emotions and affect also possible in artificial beings? This question has been addressed countless times in cultural production from around the world, but has arisen with particular frequency in the popular culture of contemporary Japan. I discuss recent theories of affect and relate them to the depictions of cyborgs or androids in Japanese anime from the last ten years, with a focus on Oshii Mamoru’s 2004 film Innocence and its dense mesh of prior texts on affect and the definitions of “the human.” Sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies at UW-Madison Tuesday, February 26th 2008 Prof. S. Orbaugh will present her work on kamishibai at Professor Ohnuki-Tierney's historical anthropology seminar at 2:25-5:25 on Tuesday, February 26 in room 5230 of the Social Sciences Building. All are welcome, especially at the beginning when she presents her work. Professor Ohnuki-Tierney will join her with the presentation on the monkey performance after her presentation. The two will be examples of covert opposition in war time Japan. We hope you can make it!! "Kamishibai and the National/Social Imaginary in Modernizing Japan." Description: In 1928 a new medium emerged in Japan: kamishibai, a unique combination of text, image, and performance. Kamishibai quickly became one of the most widely accessed popular media, rivaling cinema and radio in popularity. While other popular and high culture media were the province of the middle class and wealthy, kamishibai performers concentrated on working class neighborhoods. In the 1950s, there were 50,000 kamishibai performers in Japan, playing to approximately 1.5 million children per day. But, by the early 1970s kamishibai had entirely disappeared. The emergence, forty-year prosperity, and sudden disappearance of kamishibai as a medium were predicated on important developments in Japan's modernity. The vicissitudes of this medium speak to significant issues in Japan's process of modernization, particularly the creation of the social/national imaginary across class boundaries. This presentation will explore the relationship between kamishibai's characteristics as a printed medium and larger social and political developments, especially the ways it was used for propaganda purposes during the Fifteen Year War. Tuesday, February 26th, 4:00 p.m. – UW Department of History Job Talk 5243 Mosse Humanities Building (Curti Lounge) “The Life Story of Ch’oe Yŏng-suk and the Politics of Gender and Identity in Colonial Korea” Dr. Theodore Jun Yoo, University of Hawai`i at Mānoa
  5. 5. In his presentation Dr. Theodore Jun Yoo argues that the trajectory of Ch’oe Yŏng-suk’s life, up to her tragic death in 1932, reflects the surprising possibilities for Korean women of the colonial period, as well as the constrictions of gender and national hierarchies. Dr. Jun Yoo’s presentation will illustrate the remarkable achievements of Ch’oe Yŏng-suk: from her travels, education, and love life to her quest to emancipate Korean working women from the dual oppression of their sex and Japanese colonialism. Sponsored by the Department of History at the UW-Madison CANCELLED - Wednesday, February 27, 12-1:15pm – East Asian Studies in the UW-System Brown Bag Series 336 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Dr. “Beautiful Island: Dutch Taiwan as a Strategic Link between Japan and Asia in the Seventeenth Century” Michael Laver, Professor of History, UW-Stevens Point Sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies at UW-Madison Thursday, February 28th 2008, 4:30-6:00pm 222 Ingraham Hall “Ships in Distress and Acts of Authority: Faxian, Vajrabodhi, and the Narrative Function of Satyakriyā” Martin Lehnert, Research Fellow, Institute of East Asian Studies, University of Zurich Sponsored by The Religious Studies Program, UW-Madison Thursday, February 28th, 5:30-8:00pm 424 Van Hise Hall Film Screening: "Peppermint Candy" (1999) dir. by Yi Chang-dong. 130 min. The movie starts with the suicide of the protagonist, Youngho and uses reverse chronology to depict some of the key events of the past 20 years of his life in South Korea that led to his death. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peppermint_Candy) Contact Prof. Taik Kim, tkkim3@wisc.edu, if you have any questions. CANCELLED - Thursday, February 28th, Noon – 1 p.m. 336 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Drive Graduate Student Information Session Come meet your peers and Erin Crawley, the International Institutes fellowship specialist, learn about the Ph.D. minor and funding opportunities, including FLAS! Pizza will be provided. You must RSVP by Wednesday, February 27th so we can have enough pizza on hand! To RSVP, please email: eastudentadvising@eastasia.wisc.edu Sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies at UW-Madison Monday, March 3rd 2008, 4:00-6:00pm 222 Ingraham Hall “The Literary Lives (and Deaths) of Chinese Buddhist Nuns at Baoshan” Wendi L. Adamek, Assistant Professor in the Department of Religion at Bernard College, Columbia University Sponosred by the Religious Studies Program, UW-Madison
  6. 6. Thursday, March 6th, 5:30-7:00 pm 494 Van Hise Hall Film Screening: "The Way Home" (Jiburo; 2002)) dir. by Yi Jeong-hyang. 88 min. In Korean. This is a story of an urban boy, Sang-woo, who is forced to stay with his mute grandmother in a remote mountain village while his mother tries to find a job in a city. Contact Prof. Taik Kim, tkkim3@wisc.edu, if you have any questions. CANCELLED - Friday, March 7th 2008, 12-1:00pm 5230 Social Science, 1180 Observatory Drive Peopling of the Tibetan Plateau. Mark Aldenderfer, Anthropology, University of Arizona. Sponsored by Anthropology. For more information, please e-mail brodie@wisc.edu Wednesday, March 12, 12-1:15pm – East Asian Studies in the UW-System Brown Bag Series 336 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Dr. “Togawa Yoshio Oral History: Maoism, Sinology, and Gender in Postwar Japan” Kenji Hasegawa, Assistant Professor, Yokohama National University and Reiko Shinno, Assistant Professor of History, UW-Eau Claire Sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies at UW-Madison Wednesday, March 12, 6:00-7:30pm – China Economic Forum guest talk 2120 Grainger Hall “Free Trade in China: an American economic/political perspective” Jeremi Suri, Professor UW-Madison, History Department, and Maria Muniagurria, Professor, UW-Madison, Economics Department. Talk/lecture with informal discussion with free pizza and drinks. Sponsored by the China Economic Forum Friday, March 14, 8:00pm - American College Dance Festival Association's North-Central Regional Conference Wisconsin Memorial Union Theater, 800 Langdon Street The Global Dance Concert, featuring Chinese Classical Dance, Taiwanese Folk Dance, Afro- Caribbean Dance, along with Ballet and Modern Dance, will be performed by visiting students from Taiwan and dancers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. A Gala Concert, showcasing special dances selected by conference adjudicators, will be performed on Sunday, March 16, at 2:00 p.m. Hosted by the UW-Madison Dance Program Tuesday, March, 25, 3:30pm 254 Van Hise Hall, 1220 Linden Avenue “Does Social Context Affect Second-Language Acquisition?” Elaine Tarone, University of Minnesota Sponsored by the Doctoral Program in SLA and the Language Institute, with support from the College of Letters and Science Anonymous Fund Wednesday, March 26, 12-1:15pm – East Asian Studies in the UW-System Brown Bag Series 336 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Dr. “Japan's Motorcycle Wars: Success, Failure, and Industrial Progress in Postwar Japan” Jeffrey Alexander, Assistant Professor of History, UW- Parkside
  7. 7. This presentation, based on Jeffrey's forthcoming book from UBC Press, explores the development of Japan's twentieth century motorcycle industry, which has been overlooked by Western scholarship almost entirely. In his research, Jeffrey draws upon Japanese source material to explore this industry's four successful firms as well as over a dozen of its failed companies and draws novel, often surprising conclusions about Japan's industrial and economic growth during the postwar era. In this lecture, Jeffrey will illustrate the industry's explosive growth in the early 1950s and how private endurance races culled the vast herd of over 200 makers by the mid-1960s. By exploring both the winning and losing firms, his work reveals that manufacturing in postwar Japan was characterized not by communitarian success, but by brutal competition, misplaced loyalties, broken promises, technical failures, and outright fraud. For many Japanese entrepreneurs, technology was often too complex, innovation was too difficult, and poor business decisions were made every day - leading to a 95 percent bankruptcy rate across the industry. Japan's experience here and its effort to deal with the concurrent rise of road fatalities are important issues, for this process was but a dress-rehearsal for the massive and often deadly wave of motorization sweeping across China and Southeast Asia today. Sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies at UW-Madison Thursday, March 27th, 5:30-7:30 pm 494 Van Hise Hall Film Screening: "Failan" (P'airan; 2001) dir. by Song Hye-sung. 116 mins. Just released from prison, petty criminal Lee Kang-jae tries to rejoin his old gang, only to discover he isn't wanted. Lonely and aimless, Lee hears that his wife Failan has died and travels to see her body and register the death certificate. Failan was a Chinese woman who arranged a paper marriage with Lee so she could stay in Korea. When Lee arrives at her home, he finds a letter from Failan which helps to put his mislead life into perspective. (from http://www.film.com/movies/failan/14503383) Starring: Choi Min-sik as Kang-jae Cecilia Cheung as Failan Contact Prof. Taik Kim, tkkim3@wisc.edu, if you have any questions. University Theater Youth production “Dragonwings” March 29, April 5, 12 at 7:30PM and March 30, April 6 at 2PM Hemsley Theatre in Vilas Hall "Dragonwings" is a play based on the children's book of the same title, written by Laurence Yep. The story deals with the experiences of young Moonshadow who joins his father Windrider in early 1900's San Francisco. It is a telling story of the Chinese immigration to the United States seen from the eyes of Moonshadow. The production is geared for family audiences ages 8 and up. Play dates and times are as follows: March 29, April 5, 12 at 7:30PM and March 30, April 6 at 2PM. Please call 608-262-1500 for more info or WWW.UTMADISON.COM Tuesday, April 1, 6:30pm - Visual Culture Cluster Hire Search Committee guest lecture Chazen Museum of Art, Room L150 "The Geisha's Forbidden Comicbook: Gender, Advertising, and the Visual-Verbal Imagination in Early Modern Japan" Adam Kern, Associate Professor, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University Focusing on the comicbook (kibyôshi) experience of Edo (Tokyo), this lecture will address the advent of early modern Japanese advertising, touching on the gendered discourse of kibyôshi readership with an interrogation of the notion of literacy as based strictly on verbal texts. Co-sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies and the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures
  8. 8. Friday, April 04, 2008 at 2:30-3:30pm Guest Lecture 475 Van Hise Hall “Traditional Narration and Literary treatment: Centering on the Narration on the Chinese Cultural Revolution and American Jewish consciousness novels after the Holocaust” Lixin Wang, Professor and Associate Dean of the College of Literature at Nankai University, Tianjin, China. Co-Sponsored by the Department of East Asian Languages and Literature, the Center for East Asian Studies, and the China Initiative at UW-Madison Monday, April 07, 2008 at 4:00-6:30pm Guest Lecture Room 395 Van Hise (1) “The function of Suffix-s in Archaic Chinese”, delivered by Bo Hong, Professor of College of Literature at Nankai University, Tianjin, China; (2) “The grammaticalization of the BA construction”, delivered by Chaofen Sun, Associate Professor of Asian Languages Department at Stanford University. Co-Sponsored by the Department of East Asian Languages and Literature, the Center for East Asian Studies, and the China Initiative at UW-Madison Wednesday, April 9th, noon – 1:15pm – East Asian Studies in the UW-System Brown Bag Series 336 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Dr. “Autonomy through Social Networks: Law, Politics, and the News Media, 1931-1957” Sei-Jeong Chin, Assistant Visiting Professor of History at UW-Madison This talk aims to provide new insights on the relationships between the Chinese state and Chinese intellectuals, and how the latter lost their autonomy and influence during the transitional period from Republican China to Communist China. Special attention will be given to how law was affected through the influence of the contemporary Chinese news media. Sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies at UW-Madison Wednesday, April 9, 3:00-7:00 Africa/China Symposium AT&T Lounge, Pyle Center, 702 Langdon St. “Africa Encounters Global China” The UW-Madison African Studies Program presents its 2008 Spring Symposium: Africa Encounters Global China. This event is free and open to the public. Featured speakers include Howard French, Shanghai Bureau Chief for The New York Times, and Adama Gaye, a Senegalese journalist and former editor of West Africa magazine. Sessions will address China's role in African development, labor and technology transfer, and postcolonial relations. For more information, contact the African Studies Program at 608/262-2380. The 2008 Spring Symposium is co-sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies, Global Studies, and the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. See accompanying file in “Symposiums” folder “AS_spring_symposium.doc” for full schedule. Monday, April 14, 2008 at 4:00-5:30pm 395 Van Hise “Markedness and Second Language Acquisition”, delivered by Xiaobing ZHOU, Professor and Associate Dean of College of International Cultural Exchange at Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou Co-Sponsored by the Department of East Asian Languages and Literature, the Center for East Asian Studies, and the China Initiative at UW-Madison
  9. 9. Wednesday, April 16th, noon-1:15pm – East Asian Studies in the UW-System Brown Bag Series 336 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Dr. “Strange Creatures of Chu: Antlered Tomb Sculptures of the Warring States Period” Cortney Chaffin, Art Historian, UW-Stevens Point In her talk, Cortney Chaffin will explore the possibilities of religious significances concerning the under-studied wooden laquered sculptures adorned with real deer antlers found in Chu burials from the Spring and Autumn through to the late Warring States periods. Sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies at UW-Madison Thursday, April 17, 2008 at 4:00-5:30pm Room 159 Van Hise “Exploring the Origin of Mandarin Chinese”, delivered by Zhongwei SHEN, Associate Professor and Director of Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Co-Sponsored by the Department of East Asian Languages and Literature, the Center for East Asian Studies, and the China Initiative at UW-Madison Thursday, April 24, 4:30-6:00pm 1418 Van Hise "Korean Economy: Opportunities in Current Asia" Okyu Kwon, Former Vice Prime Minister, Minister of Finance & Economy of South Korea Sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies Co-sponsored by CIBER and WAGE Thursday, April 24, 6:00pm – Korean Tang Soo Do lecture Humanities (Room TITU) “Korean Martial Arts History and Philoshophy” by Tang Soo Do Grandmaster Randall Chontas Grandmaster Chontas will give a lecture on Korean Martial Arts History and Philoshophy in Humanities (Room TITU) and is FREE. Master Chontas has 28 years of experience in Tang Soo Do and is a 6th Dan. Sponsored by UW Madison’s Traditional Tang Soo Do Club Tuesday, April 29, 2008 at 4:00-5:30pm Room 475 Van Hise “Ins and Outs: Evidence from Adverbials, Applicatives, Light Verbs, and Object Fronting in Chinese”, delivered by Wei-tien TSAI, Professor of National Tsing Hua University in Hsin-chu, Taiwan. Co-Sponsored by the Department of East Asian Languages and Literature, the Center for East Asian Studies, and the China Initiative at UW-Madison Tuesday, April 29th, 4-5:30pm 220 Ingraham Hall Technologies of War and Masculine Identities: The Introduction and Diffusion of Guns Anne Walthall, Professor, Early Modern and Modern Japan, University of California – Irvine Did the first guns from Portugal arrive at Tanegashima in 1543? In whose interest was it to make this claim? How effective were the sixteenth century guns? Did they, for example, make a decisive difference in the battle of Nagashino between Oda Nobunaga and the Takeda forces? By asking who used guns, under what circumstances, and how did guns function in relation to other
  10. 10. weapons of war, it is possible to use the history of guns in Japan as a perspective from which to assess what it meant to be a military man during the warring states period and how definitions of masculinity changed through to the eighteenth century for various members of the warrior class. Thursday, May 1st, 4:30-6:30pm Director’s Room, Grainger Hall Sustaining Rapid Growth: Policy Challenges for China Nicholas R. Lardy, senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics and member of the Council on Foreign Relations Sponsored by the Wisconsin China Initiative EVENTS OF INTEREST: THE HAVENS CENTER www.havenscenter.org Presents THE PRIVATIZATION OF SECURITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE AMERICAS: PERSPECTIVES FROM THE GLOBAL SOUTH The Pyle Center University of Wisconsin-Madison January 31-February 2, 2008 For more information, visit www.havenscenter.org, write to pmc2008@havenscenter.org or call 608-262-0854. Registration is free. To register, send an email to pmc2008@havenscenter.org with your name and affiliation (optional) or call Kate McCoy at 608-262-1420. Co-Sponsored by: the Center for World Affairs and the Global Economy (WAGE), the NAVE fund, Politics & Society, Wisconsin International Law Society (WILS), the Global Studies Program, the Global Legal Studies Center, and Community Action on Latin America (CALA). Wednesday, April 30th, 6:30- 8:00 p.m. Room 114 Van Hise Hall, 1220 Linden Dr. Cause and Control of Blue Algae in Lake Tai A lecture by Dr. Qiaohua Zhao from the Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, and Chinese Academy of Science A fast-spreading, foul-smelling blue-green algae smothered famous Lake Tai in May 2007, contaminating the drinking water for millions of people and sparking panic-buying of bottled water. The long-polluted tourist attraction in Jiangsu province in eastern China is surrounded by many businesses and cities, particularly Wuxi, which draws its tap water from the lake. As of October 2007, the Chinese government had shut down or given notice
  11. 11. to over 1,300 factories around the lake. Dr. Zhao, a visiting scholar in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the UW-Madison College of Engineering, will speak about what brought the lake to this point and what can be done too preserve the natural wonder and its unique limestone formations. Sponsored by the Environment and Public Health Network of Chinese Students and Scholars. For more information, contact Xiaodong Kuang at xkuang@wisc.edu Wednesday, April 30th from 6-7pm China Economic F orum will be hosting their last event of the semester: "Approaches to Future Beijing-Taipei-Washington Relationships" 1111Humanities 455 North Park Street. Madison, WI 53706 Our speaker, Professor Edward Friedman, an expert on the Taiwan issue, will give a 30 minute presentation on Mainland China, Taiwan and U.S relationships in light of Ma Ying- jeous's recent victory in the Taiwan election which has brought about a great deal of discourse regarding future cross-strait relations. Following that will be a group discussion led by Friedman. Edward Friedman has spent lots of time, and has written many books on both Mainland China and Taiwan. He is nationally recognized as an expert on the topic. He was also an observer in the recent elections. For more information on Friedman, please visit: http://experts.polisci.wisc.edu/experts/2.php Also, visit our facebook event: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=15187236301&ref=mf If you have any questions or concerns please contact: Lee Kutzke (lkutzke@wisc.edu ) or Xinyang Zhang (xzhang34@wisc.edu) (1111 Humanities is located on the first floor of the Mosse Humanities Building. If you are coming in from the main entrance on Park Street, take the first entrance on the right and go down 1 floor. Make a left at the bottom of the stairwell and it will be at the end of the hall way. We will have signs posted too) Thursday, May 1, 7:30pm Humanities Without Boundaries and What is Human? Presents: Elaine Scarry Professor of English and American Literature and Language, Walter M. Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and the General Theory of Value at Harvard University Imagining Color in Proust and Murasaki Chazen Museum of Art, Room L160 800 University Avenue For more information, visit the Center's website: www.humanities.wisc.edu or call (608) 263-3412.

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