3D printing: Challenge
or opportunity?
Spoiler:
It's a bit of both. So let's find out what the deal is and how
it's relevant to your industry.
Hello, I'm Peter Bihr.
Why do I stand here?
Fad or Future?
Good to know: the
basics of 3D printing
Terminology
▸ additive & substractive manufacturing
▸ not actually called 3D printing
But that's what we're going to call ...
New manufacturing
= also sintering, CNC and laser cutting, milling, etc.
In other words, it's for all the 3-dimensional objects
produced individually or in small batches from a computer
model.
(W...
What does that look like? It's about getting from this...
...by shaping something like this (plastic filament)...
... to this.
What's possible &
what isn't?
There is no Replicator.
There is no one size fits all.
Different types of prints require different kinds of
printers (plastics, chocolate, teeth, house parts).
For example this ...
... one of these MakerBot desktop 3D printers.
This might need some finer print already.
High-precision metal parts would need something rather
sophisticated..
... like maybe one of these EOS systems.
Lots of different
applications:
Fashion...
Jewelery...
Architecture...
Chocolate...
NASA's space pizza ...
And many others, like medical prostheses, organs, teeth,
pasta.
PROs of 3D printing:
▸ easy to prototype
▸ allows production of complex shapes
▸ cheap initial prints
▸ customization
CONs of 3D printing:
▸ expensive machines and maintenance
▸ expensive to print large amounts
▸ material restrictions
What's not possible?
Many things. Particularly hard: hybrid materials.
The state of the art
Difference between
industrial grade (old news in automotive and dental)
&
home 3D printing (exciting, but poor-ish results...
More and more key patents are running out, the
technology becomes more available (and much, much
cheaper)...
...and moves down the value chain, towards consumers.
Keep in mind: 3D printing is MESSY. Pre- and postproduction are messy and labor-intense.
(Somewhere in this ball of dust h...
So what are good use cases for 3D printing?
▸ Rapid prototyping
▸ Customized products
▸ Small (and small-ish) runs (<10K u...
More examples of things printed commercially right now:
Design items on Shapeways.
Makie dolls.
You (as a collectible figure).
There's a pattern.
Low numbers, (relatively) high price.
Currently access to printers is relatively hard. But not for
long.
(Think Shapeways, corner factory.)
The economic model
of 3D printing
Assume all technological limitations to be solved at some
point.
It's important to understand the different economic
models of 3D printing (and related technologies) as
opposed to injecti...
Injection molding (and related production methods):
▸ high initial cost for setup, then really cheap
▸ produces lots of id...
3D printing:
▸ low setup cost
▸ pretty high (linear) per-unit cost
▸ produces individual (or near-individual) pieces
Different economic models apply.
This has an impact at every stage of the process and
business model.
So let's look at pets!
Some New Guidelines to keep in mind.
Customization!
You can customize. REALLY customize. Consumers pay for
customization.
▸ How much differs by type of product.
▸ The experie...
Small runs!
You can produce small amounts (on demand).
Low risk proof of market, anyone?
More does NOT mean cheaper.
On the other hand...
Digital distribution &
distributed manufacture
One is simple, one is not.
Zero inventory &
less warehousing
(Don't hold your breath.)
Opportunities and risks
Risks first!
Most asked question.
Will people print their own things instead of buying ours?
No. (Yes, but not in relevant quantities.)
Think food bowls, aquarium decor, animal housing.
Lower barrier of market entry for independent producers if
they are smart (and they tend to be). Expect challengers
to pop...
We'll see boutique producers of both pets' toys and food.
Most likely top 5% market, at the extreme premium end.
Replacement parts. Is anyone here in the market of selling
replacements or expensive upgrades? That might be
tricky.
Piracy of physical products is HARD.
...and hacking of products? You're the judge of how much
that should worry you. (Maybe connected toys?)
On-demand products/services are unfamiliar to
consumers.
Now, Opportunities
Think premium products.
Again, customization
Customized products
What can you produce in terms of customized products
that loving pet owners will buy? Toys for pets or...
Experiment
You can experiment with new products, test the market.
Once you have proof-of-market, switch to injection
moldi...
Partner with the 3D printer manufacturers, for food, toys
and accessories.
Chefjet "materials can be mixed to create chocolate mint
candies or full-color, mixed sour apple and cherry
candies." (out...
(You can also watch others experiment publicly. Time for
some smart investments in up-and-coming teams/
startups?)
Millenials (20 < 35)
buy into visions, values & personal connections.
(Also, have lots of money to spend.)
Question: How can you foster 1-to-1 connections?
Meaningful, lasting relationships?
What's your story as a brand?
How can you tell it?
▸ Through both communications and your products
▸ Customize & personali...
Think about retail & experience (Natasha Carolan)
Retails currently isn't set up for this, but we're getting
there.
How can you make your customers part of the process?
Where can they pitch in, make things their own?
Produce their own pet...
Again, think mass customization, crowd design,
community experiences.
Learn from Build-a-bear
No seriously:
Great experience = Money
This is where it gets tricky. Aim to create an
outstanding experience
to cast a shining light on your brand, across all pr...
Think of it as marketing that happens to be well-paid for.
Also: the Internet of
Things
Beyond the buzzwords: How does new technology change
your business?
▸ manufacturing?
▸ distribution & retail?
▸ marketing?...
Say again?
premium products | customization | proof of market |
licensing of recipes/designs | investments | 1-on-1
relati...
So where does that
leave us?
Think creatively about this, and to start experimenting.
In the short term, 3D printing isn't likely to massively
impact your business negatively (except at the top end)
In the mid- and long-term, though, there's huge potential
for both pet toys and food producers.
Product, marketing, custom...
There is a growing, emerging ecosystem.
Become a part of it, learn from it & grow with it.
Dive in deeper?
▸ Frank Piller (mass customization)
▸ Natasha Carolan (3D printing & retail)
▸ ThingsCon (connected device...
Thank you!
Peter Bihr
Web: thewavingcat.com
Mail: peter@thewavingcat.com
Here today: Come say hi!
3D printing & the pets accessories industry
3D printing & the pets accessories industry
3D printing & the pets accessories industry
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3D printing & the pets accessories industry

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Slides for a talk I gave at the PETS Global Forum 2014 in Amsterdam about the impact and opportunities of 3D printing (and other emerging technologies) on the pets toys, accessories and food industries.

The slides were made, by the way, using Deckset, a new lightweight presentation app for Mac.

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3D printing & the pets accessories industry

  1. 1. 3D printing: Challenge or opportunity?
  2. 2. Spoiler: It's a bit of both. So let's find out what the deal is and how it's relevant to your industry.
  3. 3. Hello, I'm Peter Bihr. Why do I stand here?
  4. 4. Fad or Future?
  5. 5. Good to know: the basics of 3D printing
  6. 6. Terminology ▸ additive & substractive manufacturing ▸ not actually called 3D printing But that's what we're going to call it.
  7. 7. New manufacturing = also sintering, CNC and laser cutting, milling, etc.
  8. 8. In other words, it's for all the 3-dimensional objects produced individually or in small batches from a computer model. (We'll get to what "small" means later.)
  9. 9. What does that look like? It's about getting from this...
  10. 10. ...by shaping something like this (plastic filament)...
  11. 11. ... to this.
  12. 12. What's possible & what isn't?
  13. 13. There is no Replicator.
  14. 14. There is no one size fits all.
  15. 15. Different types of prints require different kinds of printers (plastics, chocolate, teeth, house parts). For example this piece might come out of...
  16. 16. ... one of these MakerBot desktop 3D printers.
  17. 17. This might need some finer print already.
  18. 18. High-precision metal parts would need something rather sophisticated..
  19. 19. ... like maybe one of these EOS systems.
  20. 20. Lots of different applications: Fashion...
  21. 21. Jewelery...
  22. 22. Architecture...
  23. 23. Chocolate...
  24. 24. NASA's space pizza ...
  25. 25. And many others, like medical prostheses, organs, teeth, pasta.
  26. 26. PROs of 3D printing: ▸ easy to prototype ▸ allows production of complex shapes ▸ cheap initial prints ▸ customization
  27. 27. CONs of 3D printing: ▸ expensive machines and maintenance ▸ expensive to print large amounts ▸ material restrictions
  28. 28. What's not possible? Many things. Particularly hard: hybrid materials.
  29. 29. The state of the art
  30. 30. Difference between industrial grade (old news in automotive and dental) & home 3D printing (exciting, but poor-ish results)
  31. 31. More and more key patents are running out, the technology becomes more available (and much, much cheaper)...
  32. 32. ...and moves down the value chain, towards consumers.
  33. 33. Keep in mind: 3D printing is MESSY. Pre- and postproduction are messy and labor-intense. (Somewhere in this ball of dust here, there's a 3D printed object.)
  34. 34. So what are good use cases for 3D printing? ▸ Rapid prototyping ▸ Customized products ▸ Small (and small-ish) runs (<10K units) ▸ Certain highly complex products
  35. 35. More examples of things printed commercially right now: Design items on Shapeways.
  36. 36. Makie dolls.
  37. 37. You (as a collectible figure).
  38. 38. There's a pattern. Low numbers, (relatively) high price.
  39. 39. Currently access to printers is relatively hard. But not for long. (Think Shapeways, corner factory.)
  40. 40. The economic model of 3D printing
  41. 41. Assume all technological limitations to be solved at some point.
  42. 42. It's important to understand the different economic models of 3D printing (and related technologies) as opposed to injection molding.
  43. 43. Injection molding (and related production methods): ▸ high initial cost for setup, then really cheap ▸ produces lots of identical units
  44. 44. 3D printing: ▸ low setup cost ▸ pretty high (linear) per-unit cost ▸ produces individual (or near-individual) pieces
  45. 45. Different economic models apply.
  46. 46. This has an impact at every stage of the process and business model.
  47. 47. So let's look at pets!
  48. 48. Some New Guidelines to keep in mind.
  49. 49. Customization!
  50. 50. You can customize. REALLY customize. Consumers pay for customization. ▸ How much differs by type of product. ▸ The experience creates part of the value (Frank Piller)
  51. 51. Small runs! You can produce small amounts (on demand). Low risk proof of market, anyone?
  52. 52. More does NOT mean cheaper.
  53. 53. On the other hand...
  54. 54. Digital distribution & distributed manufacture One is simple, one is not.
  55. 55. Zero inventory & less warehousing (Don't hold your breath.)
  56. 56. Opportunities and risks
  57. 57. Risks first!
  58. 58. Most asked question. Will people print their own things instead of buying ours?
  59. 59. No. (Yes, but not in relevant quantities.) Think food bowls, aquarium decor, animal housing.
  60. 60. Lower barrier of market entry for independent producers if they are smart (and they tend to be). Expect challengers to pop up in unexpected places & niches.
  61. 61. We'll see boutique producers of both pets' toys and food. Most likely top 5% market, at the extreme premium end.
  62. 62. Replacement parts. Is anyone here in the market of selling replacements or expensive upgrades? That might be tricky.
  63. 63. Piracy of physical products is HARD.
  64. 64. ...and hacking of products? You're the judge of how much that should worry you. (Maybe connected toys?)
  65. 65. On-demand products/services are unfamiliar to consumers.
  66. 66. Now, Opportunities
  67. 67. Think premium products.
  68. 68. Again, customization
  69. 69. Customized products What can you produce in terms of customized products that loving pet owners will buy? Toys for pets or little pet statues? (Maybe all of the above.)
  70. 70. Experiment You can experiment with new products, test the market. Once you have proof-of-market, switch to injection molding.
  71. 71. Partner with the 3D printer manufacturers, for food, toys and accessories.
  72. 72. Chefjet "materials can be mixed to create chocolate mint candies or full-color, mixed sour apple and cherry candies." (out in 2014) Think licensing for recipes and designs.
  73. 73. (You can also watch others experiment publicly. Time for some smart investments in up-and-coming teams/ startups?)
  74. 74. Millenials (20 < 35) buy into visions, values & personal connections. (Also, have lots of money to spend.)
  75. 75. Question: How can you foster 1-to-1 connections? Meaningful, lasting relationships?
  76. 76. What's your story as a brand? How can you tell it? ▸ Through both communications and your products ▸ Customize & personalize ▸ Maybe new technologies can help
  77. 77. Think about retail & experience (Natasha Carolan) Retails currently isn't set up for this, but we're getting there.
  78. 78. How can you make your customers part of the process? Where can they pitch in, make things their own? Produce their own pet toys and pet food?
  79. 79. Again, think mass customization, crowd design, community experiences.
  80. 80. Learn from Build-a-bear
  81. 81. No seriously: Great experience = Money
  82. 82. This is where it gets tricky. Aim to create an outstanding experience to cast a shining light on your brand, across all products.
  83. 83. Think of it as marketing that happens to be well-paid for.
  84. 84. Also: the Internet of Things
  85. 85. Beyond the buzzwords: How does new technology change your business? ▸ manufacturing? ▸ distribution & retail? ▸ marketing? ▸ research?
  86. 86. Say again? premium products | customization | proof of market | licensing of recipes/designs | investments | 1-on-1 relationships | branding/marketing | retail experience | internet of things
  87. 87. So where does that leave us?
  88. 88. Think creatively about this, and to start experimenting.
  89. 89. In the short term, 3D printing isn't likely to massively impact your business negatively (except at the top end)
  90. 90. In the mid- and long-term, though, there's huge potential for both pet toys and food producers. Product, marketing, customization.
  91. 91. There is a growing, emerging ecosystem. Become a part of it, learn from it & grow with it.
  92. 92. Dive in deeper? ▸ Frank Piller (mass customization) ▸ Natasha Carolan (3D printing & retail) ▸ ThingsCon (connected devices) ▸ NEXT Berlin (digital business trends)
  93. 93. Thank you! Peter Bihr Web: thewavingcat.com Mail: peter@thewavingcat.com Here today: Come say hi!

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