Neil Perkin for London in Prague

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Neil Perkin for London in Prague

  1. 1. CONTENT & COMMUNITY<br />HOW A CONNECTED WORLD IS CHANGING THE PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION AND CONSUMPTION OF CONTENT<br />neilperkin.typepad.com<br />Image courtesy http://pleaseenjoy.com/<br />
  2. 2. neilperkin.typepad.com<br />
  3. 3. WHAT I’M GOING TO TALK TO YOU ABOUT TODAY:<br />THE BIG CHANGES<br />WHAT IS COMMUNITY (& WHAT IS IT NOT)<br />SOME GREAT COMMUNITY BUILDING EXAMPLES<br />COMMUNITY & INNOVATION<br />BUSINESSES WITH COMMUNITY AT THEIR HEART<br />
  4. 4. IS THIS REALLY SUCH A BIG DEAL?<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/marthaburzynski/<br />
  5. 5. SOCIAL IS BECOMING A PART OF ALL MEDIA STREAMS<br />Social dimensions are paramount to most people<br />…and most forms of entertainment<br />“The desire to be part of a group that shares, cooperates, or acts in concert is a basic human instinct.” Clay Shirky<br />Source: Future Foundation: Entertainment Futures Image: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kicey/<br />
  6. 6. Morgan Stanley Internet Trends Report 2010<br />
  7. 7. Media brands are increasingly defined less by the platform and more by the community<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/hankins/<br />
  8. 8. TURNING COMMUNICATIONS FUNDAMENTALS ON THEIR HEAD<br />“The other guys think the purpose of communication is to get information.We think the purpose of information is to foster communication.”Mark Zuckerberg, CEO Facebook<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/danarah/<br />
  9. 9. EMPOWERED USERS, UNLIMITED CHOICE<br />Everyone is a media owner<br />The means of production and distribution are shared<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/esparta/<br />
  10. 10. NETWORKED<br />LINEAR<br />Scheduled<br />On demand<br />Sit back<br />Participative<br />Messages<br />Experiences<br />Content we know you like <br />(because you’ve told us)<br />Content we think you’d like<br />We control the way it is delivered<br />We allow you to play with it, pass it on<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/timothyschenck/<br />
  11. 11. WE HAVE TO RELEARN WHAT WE THINK WE KNOW<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/adviceposters/sets/72157602720078403/<br />
  12. 12. THE VALUE EQUATION IS CHANGING<br />= Attention<br />Content<br />= Attention, participation, interaction, content <br />Content, tools, services<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/wespionage/<br />
  13. 13. ATTENTION IS INCREASINGLY EARNED, NOT BOUGHT<br />"The internet is a the great dis-intermediator – it connects everything to everything else…Previously mass media aggregated attention and brands bought it. To earn your own attention you have to do things, create content, that people elect to spend time with.” FarisYakob<br />http://blog.marketing-soc.org.uk/tag/digital/<br />
  14. 14. “A business without engaging and nurturing its community is like a village, a town, or a city without a population” Alan Moore<br />http://emptyla.com/<br />
  15. 15. AGILITY IS NOT ABOUT VELOCITY, IT’S ABOUT RESPONSIVENESS<br />“It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.”<br />
  16. 16. WHAT COMMUNITY ISN’T<br />www.howies.co.uk<br />
  17. 17. YOU DON’T ‘MANAGE’ COMMUNITY<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/ivanovash/<br />“In the knowledge economy all staff are volunteers, but our managers are trained to manage conscripts” Peter Drucker<br />
  18. 18. http://www.passiveaggressivenotes.com/<br />THE FEWER RULES & BOUNDARIES, THE BETTER<br />
  19. 19. BIG ISN’T NECESSARILY BETTER<br />Broadcast rules don’t apply<br />http://little-people.blogspot.com/<br />
  20. 20. SO HOW CAN I CREATE A COMMUNITY?<br />
  21. 21. WRONG QUESTION<br />
  22. 22. “Communities already exist. Instead, think about how you can help that community do what it wants to do”<br />Mark Zuckerberg<br />
  23. 23. HOW SHOULD IT WORK THEN?<br />
  24. 24. MOTIVATIONS ARE DIFFERENT<br />Blog Her/Compass Partners Social Media Study<br />
  25. 25. ATTRIBUTION, AUTHENTICITY, RECOGNITION, SHARING<br />"In the past you were what you owned. Now you are what you share." <br />Charles Leadbeater – We Think<br />“On the web, audiences are more fragmented. People are using personal devices to communicate. That means, what works best is the conversational voice, a personal point of view, and a mindset that says, “I’m sharing,” rather than, “I’m reporting.”<br />Howard Owens<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/paopix/<br />
  26. 26. LISTEN & ACT ON FEEDBACK<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/twenty_questions/<br />
  27. 27. GET STUCK IN<br />Encourage discussion, be a part of it<br />http://slimgoodies.tumblr.com/<br />
  28. 28. ADD VALUE<br />"In the past you were what you owned. Now you are what you share." <br />Charles Leadbeater – We Think<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/artsyt/<br />
  29. 29. RECOGNITION AND REWARD<br />Small things matter. If someone does something good, give them a reward. They might just do it again<br />
  30. 30. BE RESPONSIVE<br />“There is a correlation between the amount of time it takes for information to be transmitted, the amount of time it takes to have an effect, and the corresponding cultural decay rate. The real-time web of twitter and facebook has brought the cultural latency rate down to almost zero. In response, companies must act faster, responding in real time, to keep apace with its customers.” FarisYakob<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/bright/<br />
  31. 31. STICK AROUND<br />Relationships require building, so rather than short-term ROI, you need to take a longer-term view<br />HT http://farisyakob.typepad.com/<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/jryle79/<br />
  32. 32. “One part anarchy, one part aristocracy, <br />one part democracy, one part monarchy”<br />Jimmy Wales on the Wikipedia Community<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/vhata/<br />
  33. 33. DYSFUNCTIONAL, FUN, NORMAL<br />Image courtesy http://jimdowling.typepad.com/<br />
  34. 34. …HUMAN<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/pulpolux/<br />
  35. 35. IT’S NOT ABOUT THE TECHNOLOGY<br />"Over and over again, connecting people with one another is what lasts online. Some folks thought it was about technology, but it's not.“<br />Seth Godin<br />Image: http://www.gapingvoid.com/<br />
  36. 36. “Our focus should be not on emerging technologies but on emerging cultural practices.”<br />Henry Jenkins, Professor of Comparative Media, MIT and author of Convergence Culture<br />
  37. 37. CONTENT PRODUCERS TAKE ON A BROADER ROLE<br />Authenticator: Help the audience figure out what to believe, what can they trust<br />Sense-maker: Help the audience derive meaning from what is happening in the world<br />Navigator: Help the audience find their way around a story or issue and point them to the “good stuff”<br />Forum-leader: Help the audience engage in a discussion in a knowledgeable way<br />Ref: Tim Rosentiel www.journalism.org , Imagehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/patty_colmer/<br />
  38. 38. DISTRIBUTED NOT DESTINATION<br />Streams not microsites<br />“As we move beyond Web 2.0 into an ever more interactive network, in which users send as much material as they consume…it becomes obvious that we are progressing from the Internet through the Web to the Stream” <br />Glen Hiemstra, Futurist.com<br />
  39. 39. FREE FLOWING NOT STATIC<br />Services, applications and content are scalable and portable<br />Platforms that are seamlessly inter-connectable<br />No barriers to interaction - interfaces that get out of the way<br />Image: img209.imageshack.us/img209/5781/deadlocknajkcomafarialibh3.jpg<br />
  40. 40. CREATE CONTENT THAT IS REMARKABLE<br />If the web is a mass of conversations, then get talked about<br />Create content and services that are worth passing on<br />Make it as easy as possible for your fans to find it and spread the word<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/oldflints/<br />
  41. 41. SETH GODIN – ‘FLIPPING THE FUNNEL’<br />Marketing spend generates traffic<br />Some of that traffic sticks<br />Users are inspired and enabled to talk about your product<br />They spread the message around the network<br />Ref: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/files/flippingfunnelPRO.pdf<br />
  42. 42. USERS ARE PEOPLE<br />1<br />90<br />9<br />Every community has super-users – high authority, highly active<br />Know who they are<br />
  43. 43. FORRESTER SOCIAL TECHNOGRAPHICS<br />
  44. 44. Super-users<br />Interact/ Advocate<br />Browse<br />Data<br />Drive-by<br />Distributed/Shared content<br />
  45. 45. Social Plug-ins<br />The Like Button<br />
  46. 46. <ul><li> More than 400 million active users
  47. 47. 50% of our active users log on to Facebook in any given day
  48. 48. Average user has 130 friends
  49. 49. People spend over 500 billion minutes per month on Facebook
  50. 50. Average user is connected to 60 pages, groups and events
  51. 51. Average user creates 70 pieces of content each month
  52. 52. More than 25 billion pieces of content shared each month.
  53. 53. More than 100 million active users accessing Facebook through mobile</li></li></ul><li>A BIG FAT OPPORTUNITY FOR CONTENT PRODUCERS<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/streamishmc/<br />
  54. 54. AN ECOSYSTEM WHERE USERS CREATE VALUE<br /># #ff RT<br />
  55. 55. SOCIAL IDEA NOT SOCIAL MEDIA<br />COMMUNITY AUGMENTATION<br />Status, Notes, Pictures, Videos<br />VIDEO CONTENTBloopers<br />TCVs<br />Fav video content <br />TV<br />PHOTO SHARING<br />Aleks’ visual characterFrom TVCsFamily portraits<br />Community connections<br />Competitions<br />MICRO-BLOGGING<br />140 characters only<br />Sharing thoughts, links,Participating in chat<br />COMPARISON APPLICATIONViral “comparison” app <br />Compare The Meerkat<br />80% increase in quotes…600,000+ Facebook Fans<br />CPA reduced by 73%...Brand Awareness from 20% to 59%<br />HT http://ameliatorode.typepad.com/<br />
  56. 56. CREATING SPREADABLE CONTENT<br />4th most viewed film on Nike Football channel<br />600,000+ views - more than twice the number of views as the Nike Five TV ad<br />“If it doesn’t spread, it’s dead” Henry Jenkins, MIT<br />
  57. 57. NEW WAYS OF COLLABORATING<br />
  58. 58. INVOLVING YOUR CUSTOMERS<br />Walkers ‘Do Us A Flavour’<br />1.2 million ideas for flavours<br />1.1 million votes cast<br />Winner got £50K and 1% of future sales<br />http://www.walkers.co.uk/flavours/#<br />
  59. 59. HARPER COLLINS AUTHONOMY<br />“A community site for writers, readers and publishers, conceived and developed by book editors at HarperCollins. We want to flush out the brightest, freshest new literature around”<br />http://www.authonomy.com/<br />
  60. 60. NEW WAYS OF FILTERING CONTENT<br />http://www.twittertim.es/<br />
  61. 61. NEW WAYS OF REPORTING<br />“Throughout Election Day, NYTimes.com readers submitted the words that best described their moods. This page updated hourly with the most popular choices.” <br />http://vizlab.nytimes.com/<br />
  62. 62. …AND SEE WHAT’S GOING ON, RIGHT NOW<br />“Trendsmap.com is a real-time mapping of Twitter trends across the world. See what the global, collective mass of humanity are discussing right now.”<br />
  63. 63. NEW FORMS OF STORYTELLING<br />The NYT is the 2nd most linked to site by bloggers<br />http://www.nytimes.com/packages/html/nyregion/1-in-8-million/<br />
  64. 64. NEW FORMS OF STORYTELLING<br />Literature meets gaming<br />
  65. 65. NEW WAYS TO DO CREDS<br />The agency without a website<br />
  66. 66. ZAPPOS<br />Zappos is a company set up entirely around customer service<br />It uses Twitter for employees to communicate with customers about their shared love of footwear. <br />CEO Tony Hsieh uses his blog and twitter to communicate direct to customers <br />
  67. 67. NEW WAYS TO SELL STUFF<br />Let people watch other people buy stuff<br />and then link it through to the store...<br />Zappos was sold to Amazon last year for $1.2BN<br />http://www.zappos.com/map/<br />
  68. 68. NEW WAYS TO USE GEOLOCATION<br />BF Goodrich - driver communities<br />around maps using geo-tagged mobile tools<br />http://www.nationofgo.com/#/explore<br />
  69. 69. AND REWARD PEOPLE…<br />A new kind of rewards programme using Foursquare<br />http://foursquare.com/businesses/<br />
  70. 70. NEW WAYS TO ADD VALUE<br />
  71. 71. The Gilt Group<br />“Luxury designers and fashion brands at prices up to 70% off retail.”<br />2 million members<br />disproportionately young and high-income<br />$170 million in 2 years<br />
  72. 72. NEW WAYS TO INVOLVE <br />http://designbyme.lego.com/en-us/default.aspx<br />
  73. 73. NEW WAYS TO MAKE DATA USEFUL<br />
  74. 74. …AND SEE THE INTANGIBLE<br />“US Gross National Happiness”<br />“Every day, millions of people share how they feel with the people who matter the most in their lives through status updates on Facebook. These updates are tiny windows into how people are doing…Grouped together, these updates are indicative of how we are collectively feeling”<br />http://apps.facebook.com/usa_gnh/<br />
  75. 75. HAVING FUN<br />Almost 12 million views<br />2m views in less than 2 weeks<br />
  76. 76. 25,000 people<br />200K documents<br />
  77. 77.
  78. 78. CONTENT API & DATA STORE<br />
  79. 79. COLLABORATIVE PLATFORMS<br />Voterpower.org<br />
  80. 80. OPEN EXPERIMENTATION<br />@anywhere PROTOTYPES<br />users can tweet a candidate from within a politics page.<br />sample hovercard for a political candidate<br />Find out who is talking about the story on Twitter and tweet the story from within the page<br />
  81. 81. FACILITATING CONVERSATION<br />GUARDIAN FOOTBALL FAN NETWORK<br />
  82. 82. “We are edging away from the binary sterility of the debate between mainstream media and new forms which were supposed to replace us. We feel as if we are edging towards a new world in which we bring important things to the table – editing; reporting; areas of expertise; access; a title, or brand, that people trust; ethical professional standards and an extremely large community of readers.”<br />Alan Rusbridger<br />http://bit.ly/alanrusbridger<br />
  83. 83. COMMUNITY & INNOVATION<br />OR…<br />
  84. 84. IGNORE CHANGE AND CHANGE WILL IGNORE YOU<br />
  85. 85. WHY IS INNOVATION IMPORTANT?<br /><ul><li>Organisations feel bombarded by change
  86. 86. Many are struggling to keep up
  87. 87. The gap between the expected level of change and the ability to manage it had almost tripled since the previous study in 2006.</li></ul>http://www-935.ibm.com/services/uk/gbs/html/ceostudy2008.html<br />
  88. 88. ACCELERATING CHANGE<br />ACCELERATING QUANTITY<br />US Patents Granted 1870 - 2005<br />
  89. 89. ACCELERATING CHANGE<br />ACCELERATING CAPABILITY - MOORE’S LAW<br />The capacity of processing doubles every two years<br />The capabilities of many digital electronic devices are strongly linked to Moore's law<br />
  90. 90. ACCELERATING CHANGE<br />ACCELERATING ADOPTION<br />Ray Kurzweil - accelerating change is a perceived increase in the rate of technological (and sometimes social and cultural) progress throughout history<br />
  91. 91.
  92. 92.
  93. 93.
  94. 94.
  95. 95. THIS MEANS INNOVATION HAS NEVER BEEN SO IMPORTANT<br />Participation<br />Value creation<br />Doing things for/with people<br />Tangible value<br />Behavior<br />Interruption<br />Image manipulation<br />Saying things at people<br />Intangible value<br />Perception<br />http://garethkay.typepad.com/<br />
  96. 96. SO WHY DO MOST ESTABLISHED ORGANISATIONS FIND IT DIFFICULT TO INNOVATE?<br />
  97. 97. CURRY’S PARADOX<br /><ul><li> 4 colour coded shapes, arranged in the form of a triangle
  98. 98. 13 squares wide, 5 squares high
  99. 99. But it’s possible to rearrange the shapes so that we have one blank square – how? </li></li></ul><li>CURRY’S PARADOX<br /><ul><li> 4 colour coded shapes, arranged in the form of a triangle
  100. 100. 13 squares wide, 5 squares high
  101. 101. But it’s possible to rearrange the shapes so that we have one blank square – how? </li></li></ul><li>CURRY’S PARADOX<br /><ul><li> 4 colour coded shapes, arranged in the form of a triangle
  102. 102. 13 squares wide, 5 squares high
  103. 103. But it’s possible to rearrange the shapes so that we have one blank square – how? </li></li></ul><li>CURRY’S PARADOX<br /><ul><li> We see what we want to see, we make assumptions without thinking about it
  104. 104. Assumptions are a way of our brains helping us to be efficient</li></li></ul><li>‘TOXIC ASSUMPTIONS’<br />The kind of assumptions that are deeply inherent and deeply unchallenged<br />…like the fact that there will always be a market for what you do<br />…and that people out there really care about the stuff you're producing<br />
  105. 105. …established businesses often use existing cost base assumptions as the start point for innovating product rather than thinking how it might innovate its cost base to enable a totally new form of product…<br />
  106. 106. REAL INNOVATION DOES NOT FOLLOW RULES<br />
  107. 107. REAL INNOVATION IS DISRUPTIVE<br />“Necessity does not drive invention. Rather, new inventions come along and mess up every one's life. They would, for the most part, prefer that they went away entirely.”<br />Michael Rosenblum<br />http://rosenblumtv.wordpress.com/2007/02/24/the-ice-story/<br />http://www.savagechickens.com/2007/07<br />
  108. 108. INNOVATION OFTEN DOESN’T MAKE SENSE<br /><ul><li> Without the benefit of a disruptive technological innovation, it is extremely difficult for any organisation to enter a market where established players are dominant
  109. 109. So it is increasingly about business-model innovation as well
  110. 110. Established companies find it difficult to innovate in this way
  111. 111. The majority of business-model innovations end up being introduced by newcomers to the market
  112. 112. Many business model innovations do not make economic sense for the business</li></ul>"The issue is not discovery. The real issue is organisational, and the only advice that can prove helpful to established firms is how to overcome the organisational obstacles that hamper the implementation of new business models."<br />
  113. 113. SO IN ORDER TO INNOVATE SUCCESSFULLY, WE OFTEN NEED TO CHANGE OUR THINKING<br />
  114. 114. WHAT IS INNOVATION?<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/fabiano/<br />
  115. 115. INVENTION<br />INNOVATION<br />DIFFUSION<br />http://www.noahbrier.com/archives/2010/04/thinking_about_innovation.php<br />
  116. 116. INVENTION<br />'the creation of a new idea or process’<br />http://www.noahbrier.com/archives/2010/04/thinking_about_innovation.php<br />
  117. 117. 'arranging the economic requirements for implementing an invention’<br />…or the commercialisation of that idea or process<br />http://www.noahbrier.com/archives/2010/04/thinking_about_innovation.php<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/<br />
  118. 118. DIFFUSION<br />'adoption and imitation’<br />http://www.noahbrier.com/archives/2010/04/thinking_about_innovation.php<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/airosan/<br />
  119. 119. “Since around 2000, we let engineers spend 20% of their time working on whatever they want, and we trust they’ll build interesting things.<br />After Sept 11, one of our researchers, Krishna Bharat, would go to 10 or 15 news sites each day looking for information about the case. And he thought, why don’t I write a programme to do this?<br />So Krishna, who’s an expert in artificial intelligence, used a Web crawler to cluster articles. He later e-mailed it around the company.<br />My office mate and I got it, and we were like, ‘This isn’t just a cool little tool for Krishna. We could add more sources and build this into a great product. That’s how Google News came about. Krishna did not intend to build a product, but he accidentally gave us the idea for one.”<br />INSPIRATION<br />INVENTION<br />INNOVATION<br />Marissa Mayer, VP of Search Product and User Experience, Google<br />
  120. 120. A computer-generated news site that aggregates headlines from more than 4,500 English-language news sources worldwide, groups similar stories together and displays them according to each reader's personalised interests.<br />
  121. 121. THE MASTER OF INNOVATION OF IMITATION?<br />
  122. 122. THE IPHONE WASN’T THE FIRST TOUCHSCREEN PHONE<br />
  123. 123. THE IPOD WASN’T THE FIRST MP3 PLAYER<br />The first commercially released personal music player capable of handling MP3 files was the MPMan F10, manufactured by Korea's Saehan Information Systems and launched in March 1998.<br />
  124. 124. ARTFUL IMITATION<br />Whilst it is innovation that brings new things into the world, it is often imitation that spreads them<br />Imitating and reinterpreting the right thing, in the right way at the right time.<br />
  125. 125. THE ROLES WITHIN THE INNOVATION PROCESS<br />Three separate roles (might be fulfilled by a single person) in the innovation process:<br /><ul><li> The capitalist who provides the money
  126. 126. The inventor who creates the idea
  127. 127. The entrepreneur who adapts the idea, brings it to market, and commercialises it</li></ul>Each role is a different task, requiring different skills.<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/paopix/<br />
  128. 128. WHAT IF YOUR CUSTOMERS FULFILLED ONE OR MORE OF THOSE ROLES?<br />
  129. 129. MYSTARBUCKS IDEA<br />Customers can submit ideas for the company which are then voted on by other users, the best of which will be implemented by the company. <br />
  130. 130. DELL IDEASTORM<br /><ul><li> 60,000 participants in the IdeaStormcommunity
  131. 131. They have contributed 12,743 ideas, posted 87,159 comments, promoted ideas 693,670 times
  132. 132. And of those ideas 385 have been implemented</li></ul>Suggestions for changes to keyboard layouts to Dell Mini netbooks and launching products for world aids project product #Red have all come via this social avenue.<br />http://www.ideastorm.com/<br />
  133. 133. KICKSTARTER<br />“It’s about creating a marketplace”<br />
  134. 134. KIVA<br />“Kiva's mission is to connect people, through lending, for the sake of alleviating poverty. Kiva empowers individuals to lend to an entrepreneur across the globe. By combining microfinance with the internet, Kiva is creating a global community of people connected through lending”<br />As of November 2009, Kiva has facilitated over $100 million in loans<br />
  135. 135. LOCAL MOTORS – A COMPANY STRUCTURED AROUND A COMMUNITY<br /><ul><li> Open-source, distributed car company
  136. 136. Community of 3,600 contributors submitted 44,000 designs
  137. 137. Build and sell through network of local centres
  138. 138. Development cycle 5 times faster than traditional car manufacturers
  139. 139. A process which is 100 times less capital intensive</li></li></ul><li>JOHN ROGERS, CEO OF LOCAL MOTORS, ON FIXING THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY<br />http://neilperkin.typepad.com/only_dead_fish/2010/02/democratising-industry.html<br />
  140. 140. IT’S NOT ABOUT THE TECHNOLOGY<br />"Over and over again, connecting people with one another is what lasts online. Some folks thought it was about technology, but it's not.“<br />Seth Godin<br />Image: http://www.gapingvoid.com/<br />
  141. 141. ONE FINAL THOUGHT<br />Channels blur<br />‘Social’ is everywhere<br />‘Online’ becomes meaningless<br />As the web expands it disappears<br />If the information revolution succeeds the standalone desktop computer will eventually vanish. Its chips, its lines of connection, even its visual interfaces will submerge into our environment until we are no longer conscious of their presence (except when they fail) <br />Kevin Kelly<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/sulamith/<br />
  142. 142. http://www.flickr.com/photos/alphadslr/<br />
  143. 143. neilperkin.typepad.com<br />http://twitter.com/neilperkin<br />http://icanread.tumblr.com/post/82501725<br />Image courtesy 8.media.tumblr.com and http://www.katylindemann.com/<br />

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