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what is planning?

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what is planning?

  1. 1. what is planning urban planning arch 368 spring 2013
  2. 2. • what is planning? • why plan? •who are planners? •what do planners do? •steps in planning • professional practice
  3. 3. what is planning?
  4. 4. definitions – “plan” & “planning” plan (n) • a physical representation of something (a drawing, a map etc.) • a method for doing something • an orderly arrangement of parts of an objective the art of drawing up a physical plan or design on paper? plan (v) • ‘to arrange the parts of ’, or • ‘to realize the achievement of’, or, more vaguely, ‘to intend’.
  5. 5. definitions – “plan” & “planning” plan (n) • a physical representation of something (a drawing, a map etc.) • a method for doing something • an orderly arrangement of parts of an objective the art of drawing up a physical plan or design on paper? plan (v) • ‘to arrange the parts of ’, or • ‘to realize the achievement of’, or, more vaguely, ‘to intend’.
  6. 6. what is planning preparation of a physical representation or design ?
  7. 7. what is planning What if planning did not involve production of a single exact physical representation of the entity which is being produced?
  8. 8. what is planning ? the emphasis is always on tracing an orderly sequence of events which will achieve a predetermined goal.
  9. 9. what is planning ? For many years, planning attempted to solve the issues of urban communities, reacting to the successes and failures of previous designs to build a better model.
  10. 10. what is planning ? The promises of planning are seen throughout history in multiple examples of livable communities that create a balance between economic, social and environmental needs.
  11. 11. why plan?
  12. 12. Ok, why do we plan anyway? Does it have any practical value? One answer to the first part of the question is that the development law allows and encourages communities, and local and central governments to plan. But that's not a very satisfying answer. Planning does have practical as well as idealistic values.
  13. 13. Idealism aside, what are some of the practical values of comprehensive planning? vision livability We all plan at some time in our lives and when we do, it's usually for one of two basic reasons. One is we want to accomplish something, some goal, be it practical or idealistic. Or we want to avoid or prevent something, such as poverty or getting sick. In planning we use whatever facts we have, to help us make our best guess about the future and choose the best and most practicable steps to accomplish our goals.
  14. 14. I see your point, but communities or regions aren't individuals who can make decisions on their own. Just who decides what are government goals and desires that are to be planned for? How can you ever get everyone to agree on everything? participation You're right, unanimous agreement on goals and policies is wellnigh inconceivable. So, in doing a general plan, you do the best you can to elicit public input. The planning process takes the substance of our values, goals and needs and translates them into the substance of policy. Special planning committees and the city council must decide on which goals, policies, benchmarks and land-use arrangements best embody a consensus of public opinion tempered with good judgement.
  15. 15. I see, but let's get back to the first question, why plan? Should we build more streets before more sewer lines? Should we build a new community center before upgrading fire stations, or vice versa? 1st, it is a way to prepare for the future. 2nd : Planning identifies problems and points the way to solutions. 3rd: It helps us to do first things first. In other words, it provides a rationale for assigning priorities. 4th: Through planning, you can come up with sound policies to address growth or decline. 5th: Planning helps to coordinate development projects with one another. 6th: Planning can educate, involve and inform the public as well as public officials.
  16. 16. I see, but let's get back to the first question, why plan? 1st, it is a way to prepare for the future. 2nd : Planning identifies problems and points the way to solutions. 3rd: It helps us to do first things first. In other words, it provides a rationale for assigning priorities. 4th: Through planning, you can come up with sound policies to address growth or Where should new housing decline. go? What's to become of 5th: Planning helps to coordinate downtown if we encourage an outlying shopping center? A development projects with one another. good plan will suggest answers 6th: Planning can educate, involve and inform the public as well as public officials. to perplexing questions.
  17. 17. I see, but let's get back to the first question, why plan? In other words, making sure that adequate roads and utilities are in place before the new shopping center or subdivision or dairy farm are opened. 1st, it is a way to prepare for the future. 2nd : Planning identifies problems and points the way to solutions. 3rd: It helps us to do first things first. In other words, it provides a rationale for assigning priorities. 4th: Through planning, you can come up with sound policies to address growth or decline. 5th: Planning helps to coordinate development projects with one another. 6th: Planning can educate, involve and inform the public as well as public officials.
  18. 18. I see, but let's get back to the first question, why plan? 1st, it is a way to prepare for the future. 2nd : Planning identifies problems and Participation in planning can points the way to solutions. forestall opposition to 3rd: It helps us to do first things first. In other implementing what might words, it provides a rationale for assigning have been controversial priorities. policies. Another aspect of this 4th: Through planning, you can come up is that participatory planning with sound policies to address growth or can reveal the potential for decline. change and improvement to a community to those who had 5th: Planning helps to coordinate never thought of such things development projects with one another. before. 6th: Planning can educate, involve and inform the public as well as public officials.
  19. 19. who are planners?
  20. 20. Plan de l'Ancienne Chartreuse de Paris by Eustache Le Sueur Ca. 1645 Musée du Louvre in Paris
  21. 21. ethics nature: ecology & sustainability local capacity policy perception: image of the city forecasts heritage realistic livability decisionmaking : participation economy comprehensive systems approach strategic continual flexibility gapbridging timebound leadership
  22. 22. GEOGRAPHY ANTHROPOLOGY HISTORY POLITICS ECONOMY URBAN PLANNING SOCIOLOGY ECOLOGY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ARCHITECTURE
  23. 23. what do planners do?
  24. 24. what do planners do?
  25. 25. what do planners do? Urban and regional planners develop plans and programs for the use of land. They use planning to create communities, accommodate growth, or revitalize physical facilities in towns, cities, regions, and metropolitan areas
  26. 26. Urban planning (urban, city, and town planning) is a technical and political process concerned with the control of the use of land and design of the urban environment, including transportation networks, to guide and ensure the orderly development of settlements and communities. It concerns itself with research and analysis, strategic thinking, architecture, urban design, public consultation, policy recommendations, implementation and management.
  27. 27. planning tasks •Hold public meetings with government officials, social scientists, lawyers, developers, the public, or special interest groups to formulate, develop, or address issues regarding land use or community plans •Discuss with planning officials the purpose of land use projects, such as transportation, conservation, residential, commercial, industrial, or community use. •Design, promote, or administer government plans or policies affecting land use, zoning, public utilities, community facilities, housing, or transportation. •Conduct field investigations, surveys, impact studies, or other research to compile and analyze data on economic, social, regulatory, or physical factors affecting land use.
  28. 28. planning tasks •Create, prepare, or requisition graphic or narrative reports on land use data, including land area maps overlaid with geographic variables such as population density. •Assess the feasibility of proposals and identify necessary changes. •Coordinate work with economic consultants or architects during the formulation of plans or the design of large pieces of infrastructure. •Keep informed about economic or legal issues involved in zoning codes, building codes, or environmental regulations and determine the effects of regulatory limitations on projects.
  29. 29. steps in planning
  30. 30. main techniques of planning Its main techniques will be : • written statements, supplemented as appropriate by • statistical projections, • mathematical representations, • quantified evaluations and diagrams illustrating relationships between different parts of the plan. It may, but need not necessarily, include • exact physical blueprints of objects.
  31. 31. Ok, what is step one and who is involved? 1 inclusive process The first step in is to set up the Citizen Participation Process. This is the most important work plan element, in fact, it should be listed as a separate task. The process for how citizens participate in the planning process will be acquired. How information obtained will be used should be described.
  32. 32. Once folks get together, what are they going to do first? 2 objective framework Step Two in planning asks citizens, in conjunction with officials and staff, to set Goals and Objectives. Determining community goals and objectives should be clearly spelled out fairly early in the process, so the planning effort is working towards meeting them. These must be goals and objectives that the community reaches consensus on, not just those of whoever is writing the plan, or the plan will not be approved and/or utilized.
  33. 33. I see, you are setting it up so the planning process creates the product, or the plan. But what about all the quantitative stuff, the traditional grist of the planning mill? 3 Obviously doing a snapshot of the community in numbers can't be ignored. Step Three calls for an Assessment of Existing Conditions.
  34. 34. 3 I see, you are setting it up so the planning process creates the product, or the plan. But what about all the quantitative stuff, the traditional grist of the planning mill? Obviously doing a snapshot of the community in numbers can't be ignored. Step Three calls for an Assessment of Existing Conditions.
  35. 35. 3 I see, you are setting it up so the planning process creates the product, or the plan. But what about all the quantitative stuff, the traditional grist of the planning mill? Obviously doing a snapshot of the community in numbers can't be ignored. Step Three calls for an Assessment of Existing Conditions.
  36. 36. 3 I see, you are setting it up so the planning process creates the product, or the plan. But what about all the quantitative stuff, the traditional grist of the planning mill? Obviously doing a snapshot of the community in numbers can't be ignored. Step Three calls for an Assessment of Existing Conditions.
  37. 37. 3 I see, you are setting it up so the planning process creates the product, or the plan. But what about all the quantitative stuff, the traditional grist of the planning mill? Obviously doing a snapshot of the community in numbers can't be ignored. Step Three calls for an Assessment of Existing Conditions.
  38. 38. 3 I see, you are setting it up so the planning process creates the product, or the plan. But what about all the quantitative stuff, the traditional grist of the planning mill? Obviously doing a snapshot of the community in numbers can't be ignored. Step Three calls for an Assessment of Existing Conditions.
  39. 39. 3 I see, you increase rates population are setting it up so the planning process creates the product, or the plan. But what about all the quantitative stuff, the traditional grist of the planning mill? Obviously doing a snapshot of the community in numbers can't be ignored. Step Three calls for an Assessment of Existing Conditions.
  40. 40. 3 I see, you are setting it up so the planning process creates the product, or the plan. But what about all the quantitative stuff, the traditional grist of the planning mill? Obviously doing a snapshot of the community in numbers can't be ignored. Step Three calls for an Assessment of Existing Conditions.
  41. 41. 3 I see, you are setting it up so the planning process creates the product, or the plan. But what about all the quantitative stuff, the traditional grist of the planning mill? Obviously doing a snapshot of the community in numbers can't be ignored. Step Three calls for an Assessment of Existing Conditions.
  42. 42. Once we figure out where we are, how do we figure out where we're going? 4 forecasts That's where Step Four comes in. Trends Information allows us to assess where the community is going: growing or declining, at what rate, expected future impacts. It looks at all the same topics as Step Three, but moreover, it includes projections (e.g. population, demand for sewage treatment, etc.) and provides information on level of services issues (are there too few parks for the existing population? will a drainage need surface in the next few years? etc.).
  43. 43. What if trends show us going in a direction we don't want to go? 5 scenario The job of Step Five is to offer a Preferred Scenario for the Future. This is an extension of previous tasks, and describes graphically and in writing what the community hopes to become. In its most basic form, it is a comprehensive plan map which elected officials may use to evaluate future land use and zoning applications. With more detail, it can also set standards for services, and spell out specific future projects the community wishes to pursue.
  44. 44. I'm still waiting for the product of the process. When does that happen? codes 6 If you're ready, now. Plan Codes are the main tools for implementation of the plan, the place where real changes to existing procedures can be made. Again, this need not be unnecessarily complex, but it should be clearly identified.
  45. 45. How can the plan best be put to use? phases of implementation 7 Step Seven, Implementation, is the most crucial, though most forgotten, part of the plan for it to become a useful tool for the community. It should be as specificaction as possible, and list future short and long term actions plan needed to implement the plan's policies. It should also identify funding sources, where possible, and note specific responsibilities by agency for each action.
  46. 46. How can the plan best be put to use? plan reviews 8 The final step, Follow Up/Plan Review makes the plan truly useful, in that it encourages periodic review and updates time periods. The plan should also recommend additional actions that may be needed to implement the plan policies, such as revisions to the zoning code or subdivision ordinance.
  47. 47. planning steps in short 1 citizen participation process 2 goals and objectives 3 assessment of existing conditions 4 trends information 5 preferred scenario for the future 6 plan codes 7 implementation 8 plan review PROBLEMS AND OPPORTUNITIES INVENTORY AND FORECAST RESOURCES FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE PLANS ACTION PLAN IMPLEMENTATION PLAN PLAN REVISION

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