Networking training slides

478 views

Published on

Slides from the Networking training conducted by the AIESEC Singapore Trainers Team to members of MAD Global

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
478
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Ice breaker 1 (names + ) 2. Introduction to self. 3. @ introduction 4. Pedro and how networking works? 5. SIX Degrees of Separation (99.91% of interconnection on Facebook) 6. Content & chronological flow of events (Pre networking to Networking) 7. DISCLAIMER: this is my personal guide. Variations allowed. 8. FUN!! Ice Breaker (10 minutes) Introduction (15 minutes)
  • Game: 20 minutes Debrief: 15 minutes Scenario + Instructions: Refer to cue cards.
  • Opportunities/connections/Shared Knowledge/Promotions/Social: to find out more (what’s available), develops oneself, gain friends, gain confidence, finding support for ideas. For marketers: more cost effective marketing tool available! Networking referrals will typically generate 80% more results than a cold call. Job hunters: 65-80% of all jobs are found through networking. For the entrepreneurs: start a business.. Look at the success of Facebook (100+Billion in 2012…), twitter (10 billion), linkedinc? Access to information otherwise not received… For instance: had I not spoken to Pedro last year, I wouldn’t be standing here (opportunity given to my team, issue solved for CMA).
  • Well.. I’m not going to rule out the exceptions/small minority but for the majority, it is not. Negative points would have been eliminated via earlier game experienced.
  • “ INWYKBWYK” Even if you have the skills & knowledge, without the right connections, you still won’t get the job. Klout score: on twitter, measure how influential you are (#of time retweeted, mentioned, following, posts and whether or not it’s read). 15 years of experience, interviewing for VP role in marketing agency… turned down with a score of 34. (67 had the job!)
  • Merriam Webster: Productive relationships!
  • 4 types of people at a networking event. Loner: All by myself… does not seek help, believes he does it better or doesn’t want to bother people. When he does seek help, might be a little late. Likes doing things by themselves. We all have moments like this but this won’t get you anywhere in networking. DOES NOT equate to being shy. Socialiser: Friends with everyone, knows name + face and nothing else, not systematic, quick to move on. >Would you trust someone like that? User: Focuses on own agenda, collects business cards, superficial interactions, keeps score when giving favours (expects something back). >AVOID. But doesn’t mean you have to be rude. Builder: “ Giving”, generally happy to help or to seek help, listens to people carefully, on the look-out for information that would benefit others.
  • How we market ourselves, how we represent ourselves, how we sell ourselves and how we want people to see us. Just covering a portion of what you need to know for/at a networking event (social media are important too..)
  • How we market ourselves, how we represent ourselves, how we sell ourselves and how we want people to see us. Just covering a portion of what you need to know for/at a networking event (social media are important too..)
  • Business cards: Why & how to present it? Approximately, only 10% of people have it. Attire? Depends on the occasion and requirement. Read up on Thailand. Creative industries tend to be a lot liberal with attire but doesn’t mean you dress shabbily. Singapore’s national costume is a no go! You could add a bit of funk.. Maybe a ring, a watch, a brooch, cuff links? Email address santababy@gmail.com?
  • Psychological Research by Todoro in 2006: 1/10 of a second (a blink) to to judge and make our first impressions on someone. Confidence in this impression formation increases with time. Non-verbal cues have four times the impact as compared to what you say. NYU research: 7 seconds to create a first impression
  • 7 seconds to make a first impression Attitude (story of suspicious distributor..) Posture: confidence (and also gives away your attitude/what you’re thinking). Smile: welcoming Eye contact: transmit energy, indicates interest and openness. Raised eyebrows: universal signal of recognition and acknowledgement Shake Hands: <activity> Shake the hands of the person on your right. Now, left. If you’re in the corner, shake it with the person in front/behind you. How many firms, soft or overly hard? Research has shown that it take 3 hours of continuous interaction to develop the same level of rapport you get from a single handshake. Leaning forward: engaged and interested BUT be respectful of an individuals’ space (approx. one arm length).
  • Not doing your homework. Shame on you if you don’t know who you want to meet (titles, professions, industry, and even names), the type of event you will be attending (chamber, association, networking roundtable, service group), what you’re going to say (specific questions, speaking points, elevator pitch), and the outcomes you seek. Prepare index cards ahead of time with your notes and lists while doing your research. That’s what Linked In and Google are for! http://thailand.nlambassade.org/producten-en-diensten/handel-en-investeren/business-etiquette.html Culture: Thai Royalty, Hand shakes, the Wai-lower status to higher status (unless there’s a great power distance, YES (“Chai” –Yes! Khrap (male) Kha (female) –OK, I understand), Business cards (after initial greeting), conservative business attire.
  • Focus on the relationships and the business will be there. Maybe not right away since  it takes time to develop relationships. There isn’t a business meeting, networking function, chamber mixer, meet-up, or association meeting I attend where a financial planner, travel agent, web developer, social media guru, or network marketer isn’t pitching me their business. Don’t be one of them. Be there to make connections, start relationships, learn something, and help someone. That’s why you’re there! Not getting involved in the event itself. Put yourself to work! Introduce yourself to the event planner or coordinator and offer to help with handing out paperwork, raffles, greeting, registration, arranging furniture, whatever. Bottom line – get involved! Even if those in charge don’t need your help, they will remember that you asked. Often it’s the thought that counts! Being a mover and shaker always translates into being a mover and shaker. Not being collaborative. Networking is not all about you. It’s always about the people you meet and like. Focus on helping them and they may help you right back. The relationships you seek should ideally be a “we” thing rather than a “me” (as in “you”) thing. Otherwise, they’re not really relationships at all. Attitude drives language. Language drives relationships. Relationships drive business. And business drives more relationships. Not keeping the end in mind. Remember why you’re at an event, meeting, or function. I attended a huge national association meeting a couple of months back and my expectation was to meet the people on my list (met them all), get my questions answered about their industry (got my answers and then some), get introduced to others on my target list (check, check), and get an article in their national publication (landed a monthly column). Focus on the outcome and as long as your expectations are reasonable you’ll meet or exceed them.
  • Why is it important? 7 seconds to form an impression! What’s a good introduction? Confident, display enthusiasm be friendly. You should sound casual and confident NOT douchebaggy, pushy (turn off). Clear: easy to understand Concise: with minimal words Personable: friendly, confident, eye contact Interest generating: people want to hear more!
  • Your personal TV advert. Tells people what you do, without boring them or scaring them away the moment the elevator opens.. Simple elevator pitch for networking events: 5-10 seonds only (approximately 20 words or less)! , you could expand on this to 30 seconds or more (not more than 2 minutes) by including details of customer satisfaction and personal satisfaction. OR.. Explain, how the situation is/was and how it could be. Not a one-size fits all. Adapt to the climate, the industry. “…so, what do you do?” E.g. “Hi, I’m Elroy and I help organisations reduce their reliance on land use.” or “I help organisations go green.” for different purposes. Say your greetings in Thai! That would automatically charm them.. However little it is: Sawadee –khrap (male)/ Sawadee ka (female) –Hello. Khorp khoon khrap (male) Khorp Khoon kha (female)?-Thank you. Extended version: “I help organisations reduce their reliance on land use. This reduces cost and frees up resources for future expansions”. 6 minutes to prepare in pairs: A brief elevator pitch: “what do you do?” (+impact of what you do?) Practice delivery. Tells them the results/end-goal, not the process or merely stating it. (maintain eye contact) Come up with a few.. >>>>”tell me more!”
  • Body Language: Focus on the speaker. Face them directly, undivided attention. Don’t get distracted looking at others (signals that you’re not interested). Mirror, if you can… shows you are interested and connected. Don’t exaggerate. Don’t mimic. Tone of voice.. Movement. Manners: if you are the one who is 'brushed off', say something short and sweet: •  “ That was a nice chat” •  "I enjoyed meeting you." The key to being a successful schmoozer is simple: you don't have to be brilliant but you do have to be kind. Show willingness to converse, and support the efforts of others who are trying to do the same. Food & Beverage… (Recount story of NLDC) Well, left hand. Preferably drinks. Don’t eat and talk (rude, disgusting, unprofessional). Otherwise, don’t do it at all.
  • Who to meet? Anyone! Unless you’ve got a specific target (you’ve done your homework, you’ve stalked someone and would like to find out more..) Loners, small groups of 3 to 5. Avoid pairs as they may be involved in a private matter or would like some privacy. Ask questions you want people to ask you!
  • Ask questions that you would want to be asked . So, what type of work do you do? How did you get involved in your field? How long have you been at it? What differentiates you from the “bad guys” (competition)? What brings you to this event? Who are you looking to meet? Why? Do you have a target market? How can I help? Learn questions that will keep the conversation going. Ask for opinions or comments + follow-up questions based on their answers. •  Did you see that movie? •  What was it about? •  What did you think of it? •  What other new movies have you enjoyed? If you are genuinely interested in their answers, most people will be surprised and flattered. Resist the temptation to display your own special brand of brilliance, and when you catch yourself doing so, switch the focus back to the other person. Talk about Topics: what can we talk about? Light-hearted stuff that are not too personal. Culture, entertainment, music, movies, sports, food, travel as opposed to war, religion OR sex.
  • How do we start? If you want to join a group involved in an ongoing conversation , research shows that the best entry line is to ask a question about the topic under discussion. Don't shift to a new topic, a tactic that can make the group feel threatened. When you’re bored/one person is dominating the conversation: Ask a focus question when there is a pause, then ask “I have a question to ask, would you mind if we take this in a slightly different direction?” How do we leave? Exit lines.. When you’re ready. No time restrictions, after the relationship is strong enough-you know what they do, what they need and how you can help or not. Just leave a good impression. .  Have a few exit lines ready so that you can both gracefully move on. For example, •  "I need to talk with that client over there." •  "I skipped lunch today, so I need to visit the buffet." •  "Can I refresh your drink?" •  "Is the bathroom over there? Thanks.” “ I need to make a call.” Please, excuse me. It was <insert pleasantries> .. And include follow up actions? Or, if you’re not comfortable with those white lies, summarise your understanding of their business, exchange cards “do you have a card?” and that ”[you] look forward to being in touch”. Thank them for their time. ** Whatever it is, just be tactful and polite. Take notes about the person on the back of the card. This helps you remember the person better and also to keep track of you conversations.. Avoid awkwardness in future.
  • 20 minutes (+ 30 minutes debrief) DEBRIEF. Recap/ feedback/ sharing experiential learning style. Make connections-be upfront about what you need/want (don’t feel bad/apologise for help-that’s what networking events are for).
  • Taking note of what’s been said and done and delivering any promises made. What’s next?
  • Offering support to your networks, how could you create a mutual “give and share” environment. Effective networking is not a one-off, random process. To have strong network contacts, we need to nurture them. IN doing so, we could find out what other opportunities the person might have and be able to tap on it.. Asking for useful contacts. Traditional ways: emails/phone calls but everybody is doing it. A generic “thank you for your time” note? But if it works for you or your contact, there’s no need to stop. Work on something more specific = remember the little note you wrote at the back of the card? Read them and decide if there’s any issue that this person need solving. How can you help? Pass a contact? People do also forget about you.. So if you don’t ad he/she doesn’t, there goes the connection. In order to maintain contact, build relationships. Having a card doesn’t make them your friend. Lastly, having a system in place to organise the cards: Pen & Paper or on the computer, mentioned what’s been spoken and what you could do to help as well as follow-up dates. And.. If people don’t respond.. Try again. Maybe they’re a busy and they missed your mail? Give them a second, maybe even a third chance.
  • Networking training slides

    1. 1. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academyNetwork Unlimited Elroy Tan Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    2. 2. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academyWinner of D&ADStudent Yellow PencilAward 2012, 4 Silver & 5 BronzeOpen Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    3. 3. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Why Network?• Opportunities• Shared Knowledge• Connections• Promotions• Social Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    4. 4. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Networking• Manipulative• Insincere• Pretentious• Waste of Time Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    5. 5. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Networking• “It’s not what you know but who you know”• Reciprocal• Karma generator• Building meaningful relationships• Sharing Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    6. 6. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy net·work·ing noun• Definition of NETWORKING: the exchange of information or services among individuals, groups, or institutions; specifically : the cultivation of productive relationships for employment or business Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    7. 7. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy 4 Types Of People• Loner• Socialiser• User• Builder Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    8. 8. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academyPersonal Branding Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    9. 9. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academyPersonal Branding Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    10. 10. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Personal Branding• Business card• Attire• Email address Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    11. 11. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Personal Branding• Guess what happened when you blinked?• 1/10 second• Seven seconds Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    12. 12. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Personal Branding• Attitude• Posture• Smile• Eye contact• Raise eyebrows• Shake hands• Lean closer Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    13. 13. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Preparations• Stalk• Objectives• Introduction + Elevator pitch• Questions Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    14. 14. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Stalk• What is this event about?• Who is going to be there?• Who do you know?• Culture? Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    15. 15. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Objectives• What do I want?• Who do I want to meet?• Small goals? Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    16. 16. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Kick-Ass Introductions• Clear• Concise• Personable• Interest generating Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    17. 17. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Elevator Pitch• What do you do?• Practice delivery• “Tell me more!” Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    18. 18. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Strengthening Connections• Body language• Mirroring• Manners• Food and beverages Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    19. 19. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Building Relations• Find commonalities• Who to meet?• What to say? Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    20. 20. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Questions• What ……• How ……• How can I help? Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    21. 21. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Building Relations• How do we start?• What if you are bored?• How do we leave? Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    22. 22. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academyWinner of D&ADStudent Yellow PencilAward 2012, 4 Silver & 5 BronzeOpen Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    23. 23. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy The Business Card• Something visual• Date / Time / Function• Who introduced you• Topic of conversation• Follow-up action, etc Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    24. 24. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Nurturing Contacts• Nurturing contacts• Follow-up• Why Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    25. 25. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academy Recap• Before event• During event• After event Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012
    26. 26. www.cma-academy.edu.sg cma.academyQ&A Winner of D&AD Student Yellow Pencil Award 2012, 4 Silver & 5 Bronze Open Brief Category Crowbar Awards 2012

    ×