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Understanding and Creating
Wildlife Habitat
C E L I A V U O C O L O
S U S T A I N A B L E H A B I T A T P R O G R A M A S ...
“For the first time in its history, gardening has taken
on a role that transcends the needs of the gardener.
Gardeners hav...
Today’s Outcome
Piedmont Environmental Council
Protecting Open Space in the Piedmont
• Land Conservation
• Conservation Easements
• Land U...
Sustainable Habitat Program
Site Visits* Outreach* Land Management* Watershed Projects* Conservation Partnering*
View your property as a whole.
And then take a look at what’s around you.
Corridors
Prioritizing Projects
Pick an area of your property that:
 needs the most help
 You feel inspired to change
Or….
 Invas...
Food
Year round cover and food sources
Food
Artificial supplements vs. Natural Forage
Artificial Supplements vs. Natural Forage
Larval Host Plants
Seeds and Berries
Providing Food Sources Year round
 Example: the Black-capped Chickadee
 Winter diet: 50% insect, 50% seed/berries
 Summ...
Cover
 Protection
 Weather
 Predation
 Nesting Sites
 Ground Nesters
 Cavity Nesters
Native evergreens:
• Provide rear-round cover for birds
• Native conifers serve as host plants
Other types of cover
Other types of cover
Nest Structures
 Cavity Nesters:
Certain songbird species, woodpeckers, squirrels,
owls, blue orchard mason bees, leaf cu...
Artificial Nesting Sites vs. Natural Structures
Snags
Ground Nesters
Aquatic Habitats
 The key is vegetative cover.
Amphibian life zone
Layers
Applying the Concepts:
Landscaping for Pollinators
Honeybees vs. Native bees
 Honey bees:
 Not native to U.S.
 Suffering from CCD
 Colonial
 Hives easily managed and tr...
Honeybees vs. Native bees
 Native bees
 4000 different species (variety of sizes,
pollination techniques, floral prefere...
Bumble Bees
 Generalist foragers
 Only truly social native bee, but colony is seasonal.
 Ground nesters
 “Buzz Pollina...
Some plants rely on bumble bees for pollination
bumble bee pollinating bottle gentian
Mason Bees & Leaf Cutter Bees
 Osmia spp. and Megachile spp.
 Solitary bees- nest in tubes, reeds, dead branches
 Osmia...
Pollinators are a big deal!
 70% of all flowering plant species on the planet rely
on pollinators to reproduce
 30% of f...
Pollinator Habitat Needs
 FOOD
 Early Spring, Spring- Summer, Late Fall
 Natives vs. Traditional Garden Plants
 Cluste...
Pollinator Habitat Needs
 COVER
 NESTING SITES
 Ground nesting bees vs. Cavity nesting bees
 Observe where the bees go...
Questions?
Celia Vuocolo
Sustainable Habitat Program Assistant
Piedmont Environmental Council
cvuocolo@pecva.org
540-347-2...
Backyard Habitat by Celia Vuocolo, Piedmont Environmental Council
Backyard Habitat by Celia Vuocolo, Piedmont Environmental Council
Backyard Habitat by Celia Vuocolo, Piedmont Environmental Council
Backyard Habitat by Celia Vuocolo, Piedmont Environmental Council
Backyard Habitat by Celia Vuocolo, Piedmont Environmental Council
Backyard Habitat by Celia Vuocolo, Piedmont Environmental Council
Backyard Habitat by Celia Vuocolo, Piedmont Environmental Council
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Backyard Habitat by Celia Vuocolo, Piedmont Environmental Council

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Understanding and creating backyard habitat

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Backyard Habitat by Celia Vuocolo, Piedmont Environmental Council

  1. 1. Understanding and Creating Wildlife Habitat C E L I A V U O C O L O S U S T A I N A B L E H A B I T A T P R O G R A M A S S I S T A N T P I E D M O N T E N V I R O N M E N T A L C O U N C I L
  2. 2. “For the first time in its history, gardening has taken on a role that transcends the needs of the gardener. Gardeners have become important players in the management of our nation’s wildlife. It is now within the power of individual gardeners to do something that we all dream of doing: to make a difference.” ~Douglas Tallamy, Bringing Nature Home
  3. 3. Today’s Outcome
  4. 4. Piedmont Environmental Council Protecting Open Space in the Piedmont • Land Conservation • Conservation Easements • Land Use • Transportation solutions • Community Planning • Energy • Promoting Rural Economies and Ag •Buy Fresh Buy Local guide • Restoring Wildlife Habitat…. 9 County region: Fauquier, Albemarle, Clarke, Loudoun, Orange, Madison, Greene, Rappahannock, Culpeper
  5. 5. Sustainable Habitat Program Site Visits* Outreach* Land Management* Watershed Projects* Conservation Partnering*
  6. 6. View your property as a whole.
  7. 7. And then take a look at what’s around you.
  8. 8. Corridors
  9. 9. Prioritizing Projects Pick an area of your property that:  needs the most help  You feel inspired to change Or….  Invasive Plant Infestations  Transitional Areas  Areas of high ecological value  Reconnecting Habitat (grasslands, forest, corridors)
  10. 10. Food
  11. 11. Year round cover and food sources
  12. 12. Food
  13. 13. Artificial supplements vs. Natural Forage
  14. 14. Artificial Supplements vs. Natural Forage
  15. 15. Larval Host Plants
  16. 16. Seeds and Berries
  17. 17. Providing Food Sources Year round  Example: the Black-capped Chickadee  Winter diet: 50% insect, 50% seed/berries  Summer diet: 80% insect (particularly caterpillars)  One pair brings 390-570 caterpillars per day to their young. This is typical of many species:  60%-80% of a Hummingbird’s diet is insects!  25% of a Red Fox’s diet is insects!
  18. 18. Cover  Protection  Weather  Predation  Nesting Sites  Ground Nesters  Cavity Nesters
  19. 19. Native evergreens: • Provide rear-round cover for birds • Native conifers serve as host plants
  20. 20. Other types of cover
  21. 21. Other types of cover
  22. 22. Nest Structures  Cavity Nesters: Certain songbird species, woodpeckers, squirrels, owls, blue orchard mason bees, leaf cutter bees, insects.  Ground nesters: Bumble bees, some turtles, a few songbirds (directly on the ground), snakes, some small mammals, other native bees, insects.
  23. 23. Artificial Nesting Sites vs. Natural Structures
  24. 24. Snags
  25. 25. Ground Nesters
  26. 26. Aquatic Habitats  The key is vegetative cover. Amphibian life zone
  27. 27. Layers
  28. 28. Applying the Concepts: Landscaping for Pollinators
  29. 29. Honeybees vs. Native bees  Honey bees:  Not native to U.S.  Suffering from CCD  Colonial  Hives easily managed and transported  Some competition for floral resources with other bee species  Heavily relied upon for crop pollination
  30. 30. Honeybees vs. Native bees  Native bees  4000 different species (variety of sizes, pollination techniques, floral preferences, life cycles)  Honeybees are transmitting mites and disease to bumble bees  Some are more efficient crop pollinators than honeybees!  Most are solitary Nest in ground or tube-like structures
  31. 31. Bumble Bees  Generalist foragers  Only truly social native bee, but colony is seasonal.  Ground nesters  “Buzz Pollination” required by some crops (tomatoes, peppers, cranberries)  Can handle cooler temps:  Some of the earliest & latest bees: February- November!  Forage earlier and later in the day than honeybees  Bumblebees on average visit twice as many flowers per minute as compared to honeybees.
  32. 32. Some plants rely on bumble bees for pollination bumble bee pollinating bottle gentian
  33. 33. Mason Bees & Leaf Cutter Bees  Osmia spp. and Megachile spp.  Solitary bees- nest in tubes, reeds, dead branches  Osmia spp. are orchard pollinators. Osmia lignaria is the only native bee managed for in agriculture.  Emerge in early spring, coincides with flowering peach and apple trees AND eastern native trees.  Research has shown that Osmia is more efficient at pollination than honeybees!
  34. 34. Pollinators are a big deal!  70% of all flowering plant species on the planet rely on pollinators to reproduce  30% of foods and beverages are the direct result of insect pollination.  In 2010, insect pollination contributed $29 billion to farm income in the U.S.
  35. 35. Pollinator Habitat Needs  FOOD  Early Spring, Spring- Summer, Late Fall  Natives vs. Traditional Garden Plants  Clustering 3 or more of the same plant together  Blue, white, yellow flowers- but some have UV patterns!!  Selecting pollinator powerhouse plants (not just perennials!)
  36. 36. Pollinator Habitat Needs  COVER  NESTING SITES  Ground nesting bees vs. Cavity nesting bees  Observe where the bees go!  Native bee houses (southerly exposure)  Beetles, ants, flies (leaf piles, bush piles, compost)  Leave dead stems standing!  SHRUBBY EDGES & HEDGEROWS  Valuable pollinator habitat!
  37. 37. Questions? Celia Vuocolo Sustainable Habitat Program Assistant Piedmont Environmental Council cvuocolo@pecva.org 540-347-2334

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