North Carolina Poll Slides (2012) - Slides

402 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
402
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

North Carolina Poll Slides (2012) - Slides

  1. 1. North CarolinaK-12 & School Choice SurveyWhat Do Voters Say About K-12 Education? Lunch & Learn School Choice – The Road Ahead September 18, 2012 Paul DiPerna Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice paul@edchoice.org
  2. 2. About the Friedman Foundation • Established in 1996 • Headquarters in Indianapolis, IN • 501(c)(3) / Nonpartisan / Nonprofit • What do we do? Working with local and state partners, we are committed to research, education, and outreach on the vital issues and implications related to choice and competition in K-12 education. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  3. 3. Why did we do this poll? • NC public opinion wrt school choice • K-12/policy conversations • seek fresh perspectives • assess/compare to other states edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  4. 4. North Carolina’s K-12 Profile Average State Rank on NAEP 22 High School Graduation Rate 80.2% # Regular Public School Students 1,436,162 # Charter School Students 44,829 # Private School Students 96,096 # Home School Students 79,693 % Regular Public School Students 86.6% % Charter School Students 2.7% % Private School Students 5.8% % Home School Students 4.8% # School Districts 115 # Regular Public Schools 2,592 # Charter Schools 96 # Private Schools 569 $ Revenue Per Student $9,101 $ “Total” Per Student Spending $9,729 $ “Current” Per Student Spending $8,518 edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  5. 5. Survey Project & Profile Interview Dates: June 18 to 24, 2012 Interview Method: Live Telephone | 70% landline and 30% cell phone Sample Frame: Registered Voters Sampling Method: Dual Frame; Probability Sampling; RDD Sample Sizes: NORTH CAROLINA = 601 Charlotte = 164; Raleigh-Durham = 183 Margins of Error: NORTH CAROLINA = 4.0 percentage points Charlotte = 7.6 percentage points Raleigh-Durham = 7.2 percentage points Each Split Sample = 5.6 percentage points Response Rates: Landline (LL) = 17.0% Cell Phone = 16.5% Weighting? Yes (Age, Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Region) Oversampling? No edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  6. 6. Survey Snapshots edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  7. 7. Considering… ~ Levels ~ Differences (Favor – Oppose) ~ Intensities (Strong Favor – Strong Oppose) edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  8. 8. What do registered voters say about K-12 Education in North Carolina? edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  9. 9. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  10. 10. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  11. 11. • Parents (35%) are more likely than non-parents (25%) to see things going in the right direction. • Democrats (34%) are significantly more likely to think things are going in the right direction, compared to Republicans (23%). • Parents are more likely to express positive ratings for public schools (51%), compared to non-parents (42%). • About half of Democrats (50%) and Independents (53%) gave positive ratings to the state’s public school system, compared to Republicans (32%). edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  12. 12. What do voters know about spending in K-12 Education? edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  13. 13. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  14. 14. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  15. 15. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  16. 16. How do respondents grade schools in their communities? What type of school is first preference? edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  17. 17. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  18. 18. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  19. 19. Q9. What is the most important characteristic or attribute that would cause you to choose a [INSERT SCHOOL TYPE FROM PREVIOUS QUESTION] for your child? Please use one word, or a very short phrase. Specific impressions offered by respondents in the statewide sample. Numbers represent counts (n), not percentages. BETTER EDUCATION / QUALITY 101 INDIVIDUAL ATTENTION / ONE-ON-ONE 89 CLASS SIZE / STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO 60 BETTER TEACHERS / TEACHERS / TEACHING 49 edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  20. 20. How much do voters know about structural reforms in K-12 Education? edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  21. 21. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  22. 22. What do voters say about charter schools? edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  23. 23. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  24. 24. • Large positive net support (+50 net) favoring charter schools. The enthusiasm is also very positive (+24 intensity). • Approximately 71% of parents favor charter schools. • Democrats significantly differ from Republicans, although both groups overwhelmingly support charter schools (62% and 71%, respectively). • Intensity is greatest among parents, urban and suburban voters, Republicans, middle-age voters, households earning $50,000 or more, and whites. There is relatively weaker intensity (but still positive) among small-town voters, younger voters (age 18 to 29), and households earning less than $25,000. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  25. 25. … tax-credit scholarships? edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  26. 26. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  27. 27. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  28. 28. … school vouchers? edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  29. 29. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  30. 30. • Large positive net support (+25 net) favoring vouchers. The enthusiasm is also very positive (+14 intensity). • Net support for school vouchers is highest among parents, Charlotte residents, urban voters, Republicans, young voters, middle-age voters, households earning less than $50,000, and African Americans. • Enthusiasm for this kind of policy is highest among parents, Charlotte residents, Greensboro residents, urban voters, suburban voters, small- town voters, Republicans, young voters, middle-age voters, and households earning less than $50,000. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  31. 31. … education savings accounts? edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  32. 32. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  33. 33. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  34. 34. • For version A, the net support is large (+28 net) with solid enthusiasm (+17 intensity). By comparison, for version B, the net support is +16 points, with relatively less enthusiasm (+5 intensity). • Net support is highest among parents (+55 net), Republicans (+41 net), and middle-age voters (+50 net) for version A. Similar for B. • Enthusiasm for ESAs is highest among: Parents (+34 intensity for A; +20 intensity for B); Charlotte residents (+23 intensity for A; +12 intensity for B); Suburbanites (+28 intensity for A; +10 intensity for B); Middle-age voters (+24 intensity for A; +20 intensity for B); African Americans (+23 intensity for A; +16 intensity for B). edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  35. 35. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  36. 36. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  37. 37. • Net support for “universal” eligibility is +37 points, compared to –24 points for “targeted” eligibility. • The strength of intensity between questions are mirror opposites: For universal eligibility, there is solid positive intensity (+24). By comparison, for targeted eligibility, there is considerable negative intensity (-19). edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  38. 38. Broad Points | What did we learn? • negative about direction of K-12 • mixed/lean negative: public schools • positive: private schools • support for school choice policies across most demographics positive differences positive intensities • eligibility: universal > targeted edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  39. 39. Thank You Questions, Comments, or Suggestions? Contact: Paul DiPerna, paul@edchoice.org
  40. 40. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  41. 41. K-12, Right Direction vs. Wrong Track State Rankings By Net Score State Right Direction Wrong Track State Net N= Mo/Yr Rank % % 1t Kansas 49 38 + 11 602 Jul/10 1t Montana 49 38 + 11 604 Apr/12 3 Alaska 46 39 +7 1,006 Sep/11 4 Arkansas 46 41 +5 603 Jul/10 5 New Jersey 39 39 even 602 Jul/10 6 Mississippi 41 52 - 11 603 Jul/10 7 Tennessee 36 50 - 14 606 Feb/12 8 Louisiana 34 50 - 16 802 Feb/12 9 New York 36 53 - 17 603 Jul/10 10 Alabama 35 53 - 18 601 Jul/10 11 New Mexico 34 52 - 18 808 Sep/11 12t Indiana 31 52 - 21 1,017 Nov/10 12t Washington 31 52 - 21 602 Feb/12 14 Idaho 31 57 - 26 1,202 Nov/11 15 North Carolina 29 55 - 26 601 Jun/12 SOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  42. 42. Rating the State’s Public School System State Rankings By Net Score State Good / Excellent Fair / Poor State Net Intensity N= Mo/Yr Rank % % 1 Montana 60 28 + 32 +9 604 Apr/12 2 Kansas 63 35 + 28 +4 602 Jul/10 3 Washington 52 44 +8 -3 602 Feb/12 4 New Jersey 52 45 +7 -2 602 Jul/10 5 Alaska 48 47 +1 -3 490 Sep/11 6 Arkansas 48 48 even -6 603 Jul/10 7 Tennessee 47 49 -2 -6 606 Feb/12 8 Idaho 46 51 -5 -8 1,202 Nov/11 9 North Carolina 45 52 -7 -6 601 Jun/12 10 Indiana 42 55 - 13 - 11 1,017 Nov/10 11 New York 43 56 - 13 - 14 603 Jul/10 12 Mississippi 42 57 - 15 - 12 603 Jul/10 13 Alabama 40 58 - 18 - 16 601 Jul/10 14 Louisiana 34 63 - 29 - 20 802 Feb/12 15 New Mexico 32 65 - 33 - 19 808 Sep/11 SOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  43. 43. School Type Preferences By State Survey Regular State Private School Charter School Homeschool N= Mo/Yr Public School Alabama 38 40 8 11 601 Jul/10 Alaska 39 30 15 11 1,006 Sep/11 Arkansas 37 33 12 14 603 Jul/10 Idaho 38 27 22 8 1,202 Nov/11 Indiana 38 41 10 7 1,017 Nov/10 Kansas 40 35 13 9 602 Jul/10 Louisiana 31 49 10 8 802 Feb/12 Mississippi 43 38 8 10 603 Jul/10 Montana 50 28 9 10 604 Apr/12 New Jersey 40 39 12 7 602 Jul/10 New Mexico 37 36 15 9 808 Sep/11 New York 29 49 14 7 603 Jul/10 North Carolina 34 39 15 11 601 Jun/12 Tennessee 40 40 9 8 606 Feb/12 Washington 40 35 14 7 602 Feb/12 SOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  44. 44. Education Savings Accounts (ESAs), Favor vs. Oppose State Rankings By Net Score State Favor Oppose State Net Intensity N= Mo/Yr Rank % % 1 Alaska 61 27 + 34 + 18 1,006 Sep/11 2 North Carolina 56 28 + 28 + 18 302 Jun/12 3 Washington 57 31 + 26 +7 602 Feb/12 4 Tennessee 56 31 + 25 + 12 606 Feb/12 5 Montana 55 31 + 24 +7 604 Apr/12 6 New Mexico 57 35 + 22 + 10 808 Sep/11 7 Idaho 53 32 + 21 +4 1,202 Nov/11 SOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  45. 45. School Vouchers, Favor vs. Oppose State Rankings By Net Score State Favor Oppose State Net Intensity N= Mo/Yr Rank % % 1 Mississippi 74 20 + 54 + 33 603 Jul/10 2 New Jersey 69 26 + 43 + 20 602 Jul/10 3 Indiana 66 25 + 41 + 24 1,017 Nov/10 4 New York 66 26 + 40 + 26 603 Jul/10 5 Alaska 64 29 + 35 + 16 1,006 Sep/11 6 Louisiana 63 29 + 34 + 21 802 Feb/12 7 Alabama 62 28 + 34 + 16 601 Jul/10 8 New Mexico 62 31 + 31 + 15 808 Sep/11 9 Arkansas 60 30 + 30 + 21 603 Jul/10 10 Tennessee 59 31 + 28 + 11 606 Feb/12 11 North Carolina 57 32 + 25 + 14 601 Jun/12 12 Kansas 57 36 + 21 + 14 602 Jul/10 13 Idaho 56 35 + 21 +9 1,202 Nov/11 14 Washington 55 35 + 20 +4 602 Feb/12 15 Montana 52 39 + 13 +4 604 Apr/12 SOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  46. 46. Tax-Credit Scholarships, Favor vs. Oppose State Rankings By Net Score State Favor Oppose State Net Intensity N= Mo/Yr Rank % % 1 New York 70 22 + 48 + 23 603 Jul/10 2 New Jersey 69 23 + 46 + 22 602 Jul/10 3 Alaska 64 18 + 46 + 24 490 Sep/11 4 Arkansas 65 24 + 41 + 22 603 Jul/10 5 Mississippi 65 24 + 41 + 20 603 Jul/10 6 Indiana 63 22 + 41 + 15 1,017 Nov/10 7 Idaho 60 21 + 39 + 13 1,202 Nov/11 8 North Carolina 63 25 + 38 + 12 302 Jun/12 9 New Mexico 62 26 + 36 +8 388 Sep/11 10 Alabama 60 25 + 35 + 15 601 Jul/10 11 Tennessee 61 26 + 35 + 14 303 Feb/12 12 Washington 59 25 + 34 + 10 301 Feb/12 13 Montana 59 28 + 31 + 13 302 Apr/12 14 Kansas 56 29 + 27 + 11 602 Jul/10 SOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  47. 47. Charter Schools, Favor vs. Oppose State Rankings By Net Score State Favor Oppose State Net Intensity N= Mo/Yr Rank % % 1 Alaska 72 11 + 61 + 30 490 Sep/11 2 New Mexico 72 18 + 54 + 23 808 Sep/11 3 Idaho 69 17 + 52 + 25 1,202 Nov/11 4 New Jersey 70 19 + 51 + 19 602 Jul/10 5 North Carolina 65 15 + 50 + 24 601 Jun/12 6 Indiana 66 17 + 49 + 20 1,017 Nov/10 7 New York 68 20 + 48 + 25 603 Jul/10 8 Tennessee 61 18 + 43 + 14 606 Feb/12 9 Kansas 62 20 + 42 + 19 602 Jul/10 10 Mississippi 62 20 + 42 + 16 603 Jul/10 11 Louisiana 61 22 + 39 + 19 802 Feb/12 12 Arkansas 60 23 + 37 + 16 603 Jul/10 13 Washington 60 23 + 37 + 14 602 Feb/12 14 Alabama 58 21 + 37 + 14 601 Jul/10 15 Montana 54 21 + 33 +11 604 Apr/12 SOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org

×