Exploring Authentic Texts and Tasks Kate Reitzenstein Penny Coutas
Texts <ul><li>Texts are culturally bound and culturally specific. As culture is embedded in the language and language is a...
Texts <ul><li>signs, notices, posters, forms, lists, menus, maps, timetables and other tabulated information, advertisemen...
Texts <ul><li>Wherever possible, texts should be  authentic </li></ul><ul><li>Texts which appear simple may be used for co...
Texts – some considerations <ul><li>Is the text from an Indonesian speaking community? </li></ul><ul><li>How is cultural i...
 
Texts – some considerations <ul><li>It may be necessary at times to adapt texts to accommodate the needs of different stud...
Tasks <ul><li>May be structured and planned </li></ul><ul><li>May arise out of normal classroom interaction </li></ul>Curr...
2 Categories of tasks <ul><li>Language practice tasks  involve practising or rehearsing language for real and purposeful l...
Tasks – some considerations <ul><li>How can learners respond to this text in an authentic and meaningful way? </li></ul><u...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Exploring Authentic Texts and Tasks

2,326 views

Published on

A slide presentation from a workshop facilitated by Penny Coutas and Kate Reitzenstein for the Westralian Indonesian Language Teachers' Association in December, 2006.

Published in: Education
5 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,326
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
29
Comments
5
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Exploring Authentic Texts and Tasks

  1. 1. Exploring Authentic Texts and Tasks Kate Reitzenstein Penny Coutas
  2. 2. Texts <ul><li>Texts are culturally bound and culturally specific. As culture is embedded in the language and language is a vehicle for understanding culture, students need to be able to access and use different text types. </li></ul><ul><li>LOTE texts should be wide ranging and varied, from brief conversations to lengthy and complex forms of writing. </li></ul>Curriculum Framework, 1998, p154
  3. 3. Texts <ul><li>signs, notices, posters, forms, lists, menus, maps, timetables and other tabulated information, advertisements, packaging, diaries, notes, messages, fax, postcards, letters, email, sms, instructions, rules, recipes, labels, brochures, leaflets, catalogues, magazines, newspapers, stories, cartoon strips, plays, poetry, songs, internet sites, subtitles, radio announcements, radio advertisements, telephone/voicemail messages, extracts from media, cassettes, CDs, directions, instructions, recipes, dialogues and commentaries, talks, stories, anecdotes, jokes, songs, poetry, TV announcements TV advertisements, directions, instructions, video, film, television, internet sites, dialogue, news broadcasts, extracts from media, </li></ul><ul><li>art works and artifacts </li></ul>http://www.flote.edu.au
  4. 4. Texts <ul><li>Wherever possible, texts should be authentic </li></ul><ul><li>Texts which appear simple may be used for complex purposes </li></ul><ul><li>Texts which may appear complex may be used for simple purposes </li></ul>Curriculum Framework, 1998, p154
  5. 5. Texts – some considerations <ul><li>Is the text from an Indonesian speaking community? </li></ul><ul><li>How is cultural information presented? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there any biases? </li></ul><ul><li>Are multiple perspectives of target language and culture represented? </li></ul><ul><li>How are contemporary and traditional cultures presented? </li></ul><ul><li>Does this text challenge learners and extend their sociocultural and linguistic development? </li></ul><ul><li>What phase of development is this text interesting and engaging for learners? </li></ul>Adapted from Liddicoat, A, Papdemetre, L, Scarino A and Kohler, M.2203, Report on intercultural language learning, Canberra; Department of Education, Science and Training, pp 31-70
  6. 7. Texts – some considerations <ul><li>It may be necessary at times to adapt texts to accommodate the needs of different students. </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum Framework, 1998, p154 </li></ul><ul><li>Authenticity of purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Authenticity of task </li></ul><ul><li>Authenticity of conditions </li></ul>Liddicoat, A, Papdemetre, L, Scarino A and Kohler, M.2203, Report on intercultural language learning, Canberra; Department of Education, Science and Training, pp 31-70
  7. 8. Tasks <ul><li>May be structured and planned </li></ul><ul><li>May arise out of normal classroom interaction </li></ul>Curriculum Framework, 1998, p154
  8. 9. 2 Categories of tasks <ul><li>Language practice tasks involve practising or rehearsing language for real and purposeful language use. </li></ul><ul><li>Language use tasks involve real and purposeful use of language….. (which is) spontaneous and unrehearsed. </li></ul>Curriculum Framework, 1998, p155
  9. 10. Tasks – some considerations <ul><li>How can learners respond to this text in an authentic and meaningful way? </li></ul><ul><li>Does the use of the text reflect how it would be used in the real world? </li></ul><ul><li>Does the task encourage communication and enable learners to make and convey meaning </li></ul>Adapted from Liddicoat, A, Papdemetre, L, Scarino A and Kohler, M.2203, Report on intercultural language learning, Canberra; Department of Education, Science and Training, pp 31-70

×