Running head: SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 1
Sexual Violence Prevention within the Afro-Hispanic Male Community
Anthony Wall...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 2
Abstract
Male rape is a growing problem in the UK and in the United States. Male rapes are
co...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 3
Introduction
Male rape is the only crime that most victims will not report to the authorities...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 4
victims are turned away and labeled as homosexuals. Events such as rape can cause a man
to co...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 5
and female. Healthcare professionals must remain competent regarding male rape statistics
and...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 6
plan will give the reader some insight on statistical data, resource management,
demographic ...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 7
This chart illustrates the need for qualified services to aid the patient through his or her
...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 8
Education is the key to the prevention of rapes in males and females. Rapes among
males are m...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 9
survey establish ground rules of confidentiality
and respect towards other participants.
Part...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 10
dealing with post traumatic stress
(cooking , cleaning, taking a drive in a
car, etc)
Week 3...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 11
in prosecuting their assailants.
HW: formulate trust within the justice
system and continue ...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 12
may feel as if people are pointing the finger at them, but it is just a mind-altering experi...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 13
Abdullah-Khan, N. (2008). Male rape: The emergence of social and legal issue.
Basingstoke, H...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 14
Murdock, H. (2011). Rape in congo devastates male victims. Retrieved from Voice of
America: ...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 15
Evaluation Instruments
Initial
1. What does group therapy mean to you?
2. Are having thought...
SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 16
Resource Management
1. RAINN – Rape, abuse, and incest national network, retrieved from
http...
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Sexual violence prevention thesis paper

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This is my final thesis paper that will educate the public regarding male rapes and resources to help victims recover from these acts of violence.

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Sexual violence prevention thesis paper

  1. 1. Running head: SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 1 Sexual Violence Prevention within the Afro-Hispanic Male Community Anthony Wallace P.C.D.I. Healthcare and Consultants of Texas, LLC 04/22/2014
  2. 2. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 2 Abstract Male rape is a growing problem in the UK and in the United States. Male rapes are considered by social standards as taboo or unrealistic. Our society as a blended culture may believe that male rape is a wanted advance because men have the physiological ability to fight off their predecessors. The medical community often turns victims who seek counseling and other medical services away. This essay will educate the reader about male rape, its effects on male masculinity and psychological wellness, and health and wellness approaches to male rapes. The essay will invite the reader to explore further research in this growing trend of violent behavior. Present research may provide key evidence-based resources that may become paramount in saving male rape victims on a global scale.
  3. 3. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 3 Introduction Male rape is the only crime that most victims will not report to the authorities for fear of rejection and shame (Daniels, 2011). The global impact of rape has caused much turmoil among adults who are in the media spotlight on a daily basis. The population of males in the Afro-Hispanic community are at risk for rapes due to environmental and media influences. The social influences of rape maybe a product of child molestation or the ideology to control weaker individuals. Male rapes in the United States may present higher rapes statistics than female rapes (Abdullah-Khan, 2008). The impact of male rape may affect the victim’s hypermasculine expectations that American society places on men, especially in African-American and Latino communities (Daniels, 2011). The act of rape can cause the victim to question his masculinity, especially if he is married with children. Male rape victims suffer the same aftermath of trauma and humiliation as women, but they are more reluctant to admit that they have been assaulted and to seek help (Collins, 2014). Society tends to believe that male rape is a fictional notion that only happens to homosexual men. Male rape is rape! There are no other opinions that matter when a male victim is assaulted and left to pick up their emotions like pieces of a puzzle. Healthcare professionals must offer the same medical services to male victims as to female rape victims (AllAfrica.com, 2012). Medical services are only offered to female victims, but male victims are turned away and teased (AllAfrica.com, 2012). The action taken by trusted healthcare professionals is a disgrace to the medical profession! In the African nations, many male victims have reported incidents of rape. Consequently, the
  4. 4. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 4 victims are turned away and labeled as homosexuals. Events such as rape can cause a man to contemplate suicide based on the perception of society, especially those that are in the fields of medicine and ministry. This essay will inform the reader about the emotional and physical impact of rape. The information used in the essay will provide a foundation for further research in this area. It is paramount that community advocates raise awareness about male rapes. Activism may cause more service providers to address male rapes with collaborative outreach services for this particular demographic. Literature Review In African, 30 cases of rape mostly capture refugees who have escaped from conflict zones were reported to the local authorities. Most rape victims will not speak about being raped for fear of being branded by society as homosexuals. Some victims in Islamic countries may even face criminal charges for being raped. Rape in this instance is used as a weapon of war in many combat zones and prison cells (AllAfrica.com, 2011). Older lieutenants also raped male prisoners as teenagers as a way to make the younger male submit to authority. Some of the males survived the rape incidents, while other died from internal injuries and infection (Boffard, 2012) Research has pointed out that male rapes were used in wartime as a weapon to instill fear into the enemy. In the Congo and other areas of Africa, male rape caused many males to hide this dark secret for fear of segregation from the group (AllAfrica.com, 2011). Male victims need counseling and follow-up medical care to forgive the assailant and to progress in the healing process. Rape can occur anywhere and to anyone that is vulnerable. Our communities must be aware of the times that rape can occur to both male
  5. 5. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 5 and female. Healthcare professionals must remain competent regarding male rape statistics and quality care protocols. According to the studies conducted in Ireland, male rapes can occur globally especially with younger males because of the lack of defenses (Braiden, 1995). This article was based on societal perceptions of the Darwinism theory, survival of the fittest. Child molestation in males can occur much more frequently than in adult males. Most juveniles are assaulted by staff members working in the correctional facility. Statistics show that 20% of the juvenile population is victimized by staff that protect and counsel them. Out of 8,500 boys and girls, only 1,720 surveyed reported being sexual assaulted (Sapien, 2013). It is believed by social standards that males who have been sexually assaulted may sexually assault other young boys as well. After gathering all of the research data, I have concluded that rape can cause a dramatic retard reaction in the physiology of brain synapses. Younger males must be educated about rape prevention and counseling. Forgiveness therapy is the best approach when counseling male rape victims. Educating the community regarding signs of rape and the community resources available to rape victims may greatly reduce the emotional and physiological burdens that most male rapes victims carry. Education Implementation and Review The education portion of this essay will prove resources are needed for male rape victims. Male rapes are considered fictional fragmentations of the mind of the male that is reporting the crime. Society feels that a man should have the ability to fight off his assailant, but this may not be true for many reasons (Abdullah-Khan, 2008). The education
  6. 6. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 6 plan will give the reader some insight on statistical data, resource management, demographic specific pedagogy, and relational group therapy. A portion of my essay was extracted from my previous education plan during week five assignment. The portion that was extracted is relevant to the objectives for this assignment regarding educational planning and evaluation in quality service for male rape victims. Quality service will establish the complexity and behavior modification within the targeted community. The chart below represents the structure of the education program along with the goals and objectives for each session. According to the abuse, rape, and domestic violence aid, and resource collection website, victims of rape tend to go through the cycle of emotions before healing can begin (AARDVARC, 2011). Shock This is the initial reaction to rape Denial This is the stage in which the patient does a question and answer session. (e.g. why and how) Blaming The patients will begin to blame self and other people for the sexual assault. Pain The patient will begin to grieve, causing physical and emotional pain Anger The patient will begin to become feel anger toward the perpetrator and with their inner self for the incident. Acceptance The patient will begin to accept the incident and move toward recovery
  7. 7. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 7 This chart illustrates the need for qualified services to aid the patient through his or her wellness journey (AARDVARC, 2011). Counseling and other services, such as HIV testing and supportive medical services, should be offered to the patient immediately (Collins, 2014). During the healing process, patients should address the spiritual ramifications of rape as an opportunity to find forgiveness in their hearts. When a person is raped, the victim often feels empty, shamed, and degraded (Bowman, 2013). Counseling services for male rape victims may be awkward for some counselors who give a generic approach to every patient. Male patients may question their masculinity after a rape (Daniels, 2011). The male patients may be reluctant to seek health care services because of self-judgment. Counselors must comfort male rape victims as men and not as female patients. Counseling services for rape male rape victims should never be considered a one-size fits all. Healthcare workers must address the spirit, the emotions, and the physical rehabilitation within the teaching plan. The plan will aid the client within each session. In group sessions, some clients may require more individualized counseling. Therefore, these patients should be referred to a counseling professional immediately. The chart below represents an example of a teaching plan for the upcoming sessions. The education plan will provide comfort and psychological care to rape victims while establishing standard quality care protocols that can be used within the healthcare industry. The sessions, as described in my previous essay, will inform the targeted communities about the dangers of male rapes and the pragmatic medical and psychiatric issues related to the aftermath of the event. The program introduces a slow integration of forgiveness therapy, therapeutic trust, and destroying fear.
  8. 8. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 8 Education is the key to the prevention of rapes in males and females. Rapes among males are much more damaging than in females because of the impact in the victim’s masculinity complex (Daniels, 2011). The plan will establish a group network of male rape victims to comfort one another when distorted thoughts began to surface in the minds of the rape victims. Education Modeling For this education presentation, I will use the social ecological model to raise awareness regarding male assaults. The social ecological model approaches health promotion, the interplay between environmental resources and the health habits and environments that promote or hinder well-being (Pender, 2011). Some crimes are committed due to learned behavior as a child. In the Congo, young boys were recruited as soldiers to fight in the rebel wars. The boys shoot and kill other citizens, rape the women and other boys, and commit other crimes assigned by the lieutenant. Most of the boys were raped at a young age as a submission to the lieutenant (Murdock, 2011). This model will prove that educating the community, we may lower the chances of male and female rapes, formulate a justice systems that will investigate male rapes as true crimes, and establish resource management for medical and counseling services. The model will also serve as a platform in establishing solid research to aid more male rape victims. Education Seminars and Counseling Sessions Week 1 Education Seminar, History and etiology of rape, community awareness and initial assessment and The group will conduct their formal introductions to group and moderator. The group will learn the purpose and objectives of the group. We will
  9. 9. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 9 survey establish ground rules of confidentiality and respect towards other participants. Participants will establish sponsor/buddy to talk to outside the group when need. This will teach the participants to establish their own community instead of seeking affirmation from others in the surrounding communities. The moderator will explore the history and the etiology of rape with the surrounding communities. HW: Establish a baseline communication with sponsor. This may prevent resistance during the sessions. Week 2 Communication within the groups and dyads The class will establish communication within the group by open floor methods regarding the rape, judgment of others in the group, and address other forms of conflict (Corey, 2014). We will also explore options of buddy pairing and dyad work HW: establish a baseline of forgiveness and spiritual healing. Find methods of
  10. 10. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 10 dealing with post traumatic stress (cooking , cleaning, taking a drive in a car, etc) Week 3 Traumatic Stress Conduct intensive therapy within the group by conducting self-imagery to relax the mind-body and work on trust issues. The class will conduct another open floor exercise as well as journaling exercise to promote forgiveness and release negative energy. HW: self-journal writing of the event that took place and letter writing of forgiveness to the perpetrator. Week 4 Wrap-up This session will focus on continuum care for traumatic victims. Some group members may be referred to a psychiatrist/psychologist if traumatic symptoms are acute and unstable. The program will also give resource literature to the participants such as RAINN pamphlets, research literature, medical and further counseling, and state and federal justice advocates to aid
  11. 11. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 11 in prosecuting their assailants. HW: formulate trust within the justice system and continue with the stages of healing for rape victims. Conclusions Conducting the research was the most insightful process that I have ever experienced. Male rape has affected many men across the globe with physical and emotional trauma. Society’s views on this subject are mistaken and must be corrected with education. Preventive health education is the key to health and wellness. The subject of male rape may be taboo in many countries including some parts of the United States. Health care professionals must raise awareness within the community in effort to confront male assailants and comfort closeted victims. Male rape victims will not come forward because of the allegations of being a homosexual (Murdock, 2011). Therefore, healthcare professionals must counsel these patients as individuals. Group therapy in most cases may not be an acceptable approach because of local laws associated with sodomy. The approach to relieving male suffering is to ensure that safety and conflict has been addressed before group therapy can bring (Corey, 2014). For example, in the United States, male rapes occur more often in the armed forces than in the public (UPI, 2012). Many rape victims that are in the armed forces may face retaliation for coming forward. The assailant may be a high-ranking official, which may cause the victim’s testimony to be ignored. The objective of the essay is to educate and inspire my readers to see the light of forgiveness and achieve a sense of strong will that the rapist cannot break. Rape victims
  12. 12. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 12 may feel as if people are pointing the finger at them, but it is just a mind-altering experience that leads to self-judgment and emotional destruction. I recommend public service announcements geared toward male rape victims. Healthcare professionals must establish social services programs that will aid in the recovery of emotional masculinity References AARDVARC. (2011). Stages of healing process. Retrieved from Stages of Healing : http://www.aardvarc.org/rape/about/healing.shtml
  13. 13. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 13 Abdullah-Khan, N. (2008). Male rape: The emergence of social and legal issue. Basingstoke, Hampshire, GBR: Palgrave Macmillan. AllAfrica.com. (2011). Unreported horrors - Male rape. Retrieved from ProQuest : http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/docview/903803480 AllAfrica.com. (2012). Male rape survivors demand equal services. Retrieved from Proquest:http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/docview/1223347628 Boffard, R. (2012). Victory for male rape . Retrieved from TheSouthAfrican.com : http://www.thesouthafrican.com/news/victory-for-male-rape.htm Bowman, T. (2013). Shame, guilt, and christian counseling: An attachment-based perspective. Retrieved from American Association of Christian Counselors : http://www.aacc.net/2013/10/29/shame-guilt-and-christian-counseling-an- attachment-based-perspective/ Braiden, O. (1995). Male victims of rape. Retrieved from Proquest: http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/docview/310077446 Collins, G. (2014). Counseling male rape victims. Retrieved from ProQuest: http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/docview/121958468 Corey, G. C. (2014). Groups in action: Evolution and challenges 2nd (ed). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole Learning . Daniels, A. (2011). Men get raped too. Retrieved from Revolutionary Paideia : http://revolutionarypaideia.com/2011/03/11/men-get-raped-too/ Dysert, G. (2012). Rape and spiritual death . Feminist Theology, Sage Publishers, 209-10.
  14. 14. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 14 Murdock, H. (2011). Rape in congo devastates male victims. Retrieved from Voice of America: http://www.voanews.com/content/rape-in-congo-devastates-male-victims- 134117048/148375.html Pender, N. M. (2011). Health promotion in nursing practice 6th (ed). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Publishing. Sapien, J. (2013). Rape and other sexual viloence prevalent in juvenile justice system . Retrieved from Pro publica: http://www.propublica.org/article/rape-and-other- sexual-violence-prevalent-in-juvenile-justice-system UPI. (2012). Male military rape survivor speaks out. Retrieved from Military.com: http://www.military.com/daily-news/2013/05/18/male-military-rape-survivors- speak-out.html Appendices I
  15. 15. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 15 Evaluation Instruments Initial 1. What does group therapy mean to you? 2. Are having thoughts of suicide? 3. How are feeling today? 4. Did your rape occur recently or in the past 2 years? 5. Are you on any medications? 6. Are there any concerns that I should be aware of? 7. What do you hope to gain from the sessions? Ending 1. What have you learned from the sessions? 2. Have your feelings toward the assailant changed? 3. What could the moderator have done better to make this challenge easy for you? 4. Do you have any other medical or counseling needs today? 5. Has there been a change in your medical condition during the sessions? Comments _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ Appendices II
  16. 16. SEXUAL VOICENCE PREVENTION 16 Resource Management 1. RAINN – Rape, abuse, and incest national network, retrieved from http://www.rainn.org/get-information/types-of-sexual-assault/male-sexual-assault. 2. MCSR - Men can stop rape, Retrieved from http://www.mencanstoprape.org/Resources/resources-for-male-survivors.html. 3. Pandora’s Project, For male survivor of rape and abuse, Retrieved from http://www.pandys.org/malesurvivors.html. 4. Military.com, Male military rape survivors speak out, Retrieved from http://www.military.com/daily-news/2013/05/18/male-military-rape-survivors-speak- out.html.

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