Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The 2nd Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes & Needs (DAWN2) study: objectives and methodology

1,063 views

Published on

The 2nd Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes & Needs (DAWN2) study: objectives and methodology

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Discover How Thousands of Men and Women Worldwide Have Already Used The Reverse Diabetes Today™ System To Lower Blood Sugar To Normal And Safely Reverse Their Type 2 Diabetes Without Drugs or Insulin. ●●● https://bit.ly/2swQ6OO
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • I discovered the 60-sec Habit that reversed my type 2 diabetes and melted away 56lbs of fat and discovered the real cause of diabetes... ➤➤ https://tinyurl.com/y2956vb5
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • I would never forgive myself it i didn't give you one last opportunity to try the incredible Halki Diabetes Remedy for yourself! ★★★ http://ishbv.com/bloodsug/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • 1 cup burns 1lb of diabetic fat every 72 hours... ➤➤ http://t.cn/AiBhrtGG
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Greek Ritual REVERSES Diabetes (do this before bed) Before you go to bed tonight, do this ONE "stupidly simple" Greek ritual to reverse your diabetes... ◆◆◆ http://scamcb.com/bloodsug/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

The 2nd Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes & Needs (DAWN2) study: objectives and methodology

  1. 1. The 2nd Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes & Needs (DAWN2) study: objectives and methodology Richard Holt University of Southampton, UK on behalf of the DAWN2 Study Group Rachid Malek, Johan Wens, João Eduardo Salles, Katharina Kovacs Burns, Michael Vallis, Xiaohui Guo, Ingrid Willaing, Gérard Reach, Norbert Hermanns, Bernhard Kulzer, Frans Pouwer, Antonio Nicolucci, Marco Comaschi, Hitoshi Ishii, Miguel Escalante, Andrzej Kokoszka, Alexandre Mayorov, Edelmiro Menendez, Ilhan Tarkun, Melanie Davies, Angus Forbes, Neil Munro, Mark Peyrot, Søren Eik Skovlund, & Christine Mullan-Jensen
  2. 2. Richard Holt has acted as an advisory board member and speaker for Novo Nordisk, and as a speaker, for Sanofi- Aventis, Eli Lilly, Otsuka and Bristol-Myers Squibb. He has received grants in support of investigator trials from Novo Nordisk and has received funding for travel and accommodation to attend DAWN2 International Publication Planning Committee meetings and to attend this meeting
  3. 3. DAWN study in 2001 5426 Adults with diabetes 13 Countries 3982 Healthcare professionals Platform for stakeholder dialogue and engagement To improve outcomes in diabetes, we must focus on the person with the condition
  4. 4. 1. Improve dialogue and communication between people with diabetes and healthcare professionals DAWN call to action The 2nd DAWN International Summit 5 November 2003, London, UK: Practical Diabetes International, Volume 21, Issue 5, 2004 1 1. Improve team-based care of and communication among healthcare professionals2 1. Increase delivery of individual support for more active self-management and healthier lifestyle3 1. Overcome emotional barriers to effective therapy among healthcare professionals and people with diabetes4 1. Enable healthcare professionals to assess and address needs for psychological support and treatment among people with diabetes 5
  5. 5. Why was a new study required? 1. International Diabetes Federation (IDF). IDF Diabetes Atlas, 6th edition revision, 2014.www.idf.org/diabetesatlas; 2. IDF Diabetes Atlas, Fifth Edition, 2011 3. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs312/en/index.html 387million People with diabetes today 1 Will increase to 592 million by 20352 10seconds Three more people will develop diabetes3 Every Primary health systems are under- resourced and poorly designed to deliver empowering and supportive preventive diabetes and chronic care Active broad involvement of people with diabetes and their family members, use of chronic care models, and IT/mobile technologies are yet to be fully realised DAWN2 required to provide new global evidence and a partnership platform to drive long-term change for person-centered chronic care and prevention
  6. 6. Society: A healthcare system, government, and public that are willing to listen, change, and be supportive of my condition Me: Being able to cope with my condition, and living a full, healthy, and productive life Family and friends: Emotional and practical support in all aspects of my condition Community: Medical care and treatment: Access to quality diagnosis, treatment, care, and information Work/school: Support for, and understanding of, my condition Living: Having the same opportunities to enjoy life as everybody else The DAWN™ needs model 2011. DAWN Study 2001 DAWN Youth Study 2008; DAWN2 Dialogue Events 2011 A new needs model for diabetes
  7. 7. The DAWN2 study
  8. 8. Long-term study goals  Raise awareness of the unmet needs of people with diabetes, their family members, and healthcare professionals  Facilitate new dialogue and collaboration among all key stakeholders in diabetes to improve patient involvement and equal access to quality care, self-management education, and support  Drive scientific benchmarking and better practice sharing to facilitate global, national, and local action for person-centered diabetes care To enable all people with diabetes to live full, healthy, and productive lives, and be actively engaged in preserving their own health and quality of life
  9. 9. Unique elements  A participatory process: from concept to action  Building on a decade of DAWN insights worldwide  Use of IDF, IAPO, and WHO models for person-centered chronic care, rights, and responsibilities  A 360º approach to explore also the needs of family members and healthcare professionals  Benchmarking person-centered diabetes care  Benchmarking national policies for person-centered care  Personal narratives of all stakeholder groups IDF, International Diabetes Federation; IAPO, International Alliance of Patients’ Organizations; WHO, World Health Organization
  10. 10. Objectives Primary Outcome  Assess potential barriers to and facilitators of active self- management of diabetes among people with diabetes and their family members and healthcare professionals Secondary Outcomes  Establish national benchmarks for health status, quality of life, access to self-management education and to self-care in diabetes  Assess the access to, and use and benefit of, support from healthcare teams, family and friends, communities and society  Explore and pinpoint the most important facilitators and barriers to person-centered chronic care for each stakeholder group  Identify successes, wishes, needs, preferences and priorities for change for all stakeholders
  11. 11. Participating countries Mexico Netherlands Poland Russian Fed. Spain Turkey UK USA Algeria Canada China Denmark France Germany India Italy Japan Peyrot M, et al. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013;99:174–84
  12. 12. Key stakeholders identified for study participation  People with diabetes (≥18 years) − Type 1 − Type 2  Treated with insulin (Insulin Med)  Treated with diabetes medication other than insulin (Non-Insulin Med)  Not treated with any diabetes medication (Non-Med)  Adult family members of adults with diabetes  Healthcare professionals who treat people with diabetes − Primary care/General practitioners (PCPs/GPs) − Diabetes specialists − Nurses/Educators − Dieticians/Nutritionists Peyrot M, et al. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013;99:174–84
  13. 13. Qualification criteria: Healthcare professionals Peyrot M, et al. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013;99:174–84 PCPs/GPs • Primary specialty of general practice or internal medicine • 5+ adult patients with diabetes per month • Initiate oral diabetes medication Specialists • Primary specialty of endocrinology, diabetology, or general practice/internal medicine with sub-speciality in diabetes • 20->50 adult patients with diabetes per month (varies by country) • Prescribe insulin for diabetes Nurses/Dieticians • General practice and diabetes nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, dieticians, and nutritionists • 5+ adult patients with diabetes per month • Agree to participate upon review of the informed consent form provided • Currently reside in each country • Have been in practice/their profession for at least 1 year All participants must Specific criteria
  14. 14. Qualification criteria: People with diabetes and family members Peyrot M, et al. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013;99:174–84 • Diagnosed with diabetes by a healthcare professional • At least 12 months ago • Not only during pregnancy People with diabetes • Not diagnosed with diabetes • Live in the same household with an adult 18+ years of age with diabetes (not only during pregnancy) • Involved in the care of the adult with diabetes Family members • Agree to participate upon review of the informed consent form provided • Currently reside in each country • Be 18+ years of age All participants must Specific criteria
  15. 15. Recruitment and interviewing process Peyrot M, et al. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013;99:174–84 Identified from  Online panels and databases  Phone lists  General population directories, physician/hospital directories  Referrals from participating people with diabetes (family members only)  Professional association lists (healthcare professionals only) Invited by  Email  Phone  Hospital intercept  In-person methods Surveys conducted  Online  By phone (people with diabetes and family members only)  In-person (people with diabetes and family members only) Survey language  Local language(s) (except for India healthcare professionals – English)
  16. 16. Data collection Peyrot M, et al. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013;99:174–84 1. National geographic coverage was ensured for the majority of the countries Geographic coverage 1. A wide range of socio-economic status was ensured for people with diabetes and family members Demographic representation 1. The surveys were conducted between March and September 2012 Data collection timing
  17. 17. Country sample quotas GP, general practitioner; PCP, primary care physician T1DM, type 1 diabetes mellitus; T2DM, type 2 diabetes mellitus Total participants per country n=900 People with diabetes n=500 T1DM n=80 T2DM (n=420) -Insulin medicated (n=150) -Non-insulin medicated (n=170) -Non-medicated (n=100) Family members n=120 Healthcare professionals n=280 PCPs/GPs n=120 Diabetes specialists n=80 Nurses/dietitians n=80 Peyrot M, et al. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013;99:174–84
  18. 18. Total participants globally n=15,438 People with diabetes1 n=8596 Type 1 n=1368 Type 2 (n= 7228) -Insulin Med (n=2591) -Non-Insulin Med (n=2937) -Non-Med (n=1700) Family members2 n=2057 Healthcare professionals3 n=4785 PCPs/GPs n=2066 Diabetes specialists n=1350 Nurses n=827 Dietitians n=542 Total study population 1. Nicolucci A, et al. Diabet Med 2013;30:767–77; 2. Kovacs Burns K, et al. Diabet Med 2013;30:778–88 3. Holt R, et al. Diabet Med 2013;30:789–98
  19. 19. Questionnaire development  Questionnaires developed by international multi-disciplinary workgroup including people with diabetes  Questionnaire based on person-centered model for chronic care  Questionnaires for each stakeholder group mirror each other  Original DAWN study questions for evaluation of trends  New questions for issues such as discrimination and education  Validated measures (and adaptations thereof) for the purpose of cross-national and longitudinal benchmarking  Open-ended questions to capture individual stories Peyrot M, et al. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013;99:174–84 Stuckey H, et al. ADA 2013, Chicago; Abstract 2013-A-4653
  20. 20. Questionnaire topics Peyrot M, et al. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013;99:174–84 Attitudes and beliefs about diabetes Care and support/involvement Diabetes education and information Health/quality of life (people with diabetes and family members) Diabetes profile Active self-management Diabetes training (healthcare professionals) Future needs Demographic and practice characteristics
  21. 21. The first DAWN2™ benchmarking results
  22. 22. Percentage of people concerned about the risk of hypoglycemia by country The dotted line represents the mean value relative to the entire sample of people with diabetes. Nicolucci A, et al. Diabet Med 2013;30:767–77
  23. 23. Barriers to diabetes medications People with diabetes would be willing to start insulin if recommended Base: All qualified people with diabetes who currently receive meds other than insulin or other injectables or do not receive any diabetes medications (variable base) Q1458/Q1460 Please rate to what extent you agree with the following statements about diabetes medication based on your own experience or knowledge/about diabetes treatment and medication. Scale of: fully disagree, mainly disagree, mainly agree, fully agree, not sure A People with diabetes would be willing to start injectables other than insulin if recommended B AB ABC ABD Starting insulin means people with diabetes have not followed treatment recommendations properly B AB
  24. 24. Risk of hypoglycaemia associated with insulin Taking insulin increases the risk of low blood sugar (% of people with diabetes on medication who mainly or fully agree) Base: All qualified people with diabetes (Type 1: n=1,368; Type 2 Insulin users: n=2,591; Type 2 Non-Insulin users: n=2,937) Q1458 Please rate to what extent you agree with the following statements about diabetes medications based on your own experience or knowledge. Scale of: fully disagree, mainly disagree, mainly agree, fully agree, not sure D BD
  25. 25. Access to mental health professionals for referral A ABD A % of health care professionals feeling there should be better access to psychologists or psychiatrists for referral (ratings of 5 or 6 on a 6-point agreement scale) Base: All qualified health care professionals (PCPs/GPs: n=2,066; Specialists: n=1,350; Nurses: n=827; Dietitians: n=542) Q955 Thinking generally about diabetes care in your country, please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each of the following statements. Scale of: fully disagree (1) to fully agree (6)
  26. 26. 33% 43% 26% 49% 61% 36% 0% 100% I prefer to delay the initiation of GLP-1 analogues until it is absolutely essential I prefer to delay the initiation of insulin until it is absolutely essential I prefer to delay the initiation of oral therapy until it is absolutely essential PCPs/GPs (A) Specialists (B) ‘Fully/Mainly Agree’ Ratings Attitudes about type 2 treatments (Physicians) Base: All Qualified Physicians (PCPs: n=2,066; Specialists: n=1,350) Q1010 Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with the following treatment approaches for Type 2 patients with diabetes. B B B
  27. 27. 48% 74% 72% 65% 68% 69% 87% 89% 43% 72% 65% 68% 60% 66% 78% 83% 0% 100% Less pain or discomfort when taking medications Greater effect on multiple risk factors for complications Greater effect on lowering blood sugar Fewer daily doses Greater flexibility of dosing times to fit a patient's lifestyle Fewer side effects (other than hypoglycemia and weight gain) Less risk of weight gain Less risk of hypoglycemia PCPs/GPs (A) Specialists (B) Improvements in diabetes medication (Physicians) Base: All Qualified Physicians (PCPs: n=2,066; Specialists: n=1,350) Q1015 Please consider the treatments that are currently available. Which improvements in diabetes medication would be most helpful for improving outcomes for your patients with diabetes? Improvements Physicians Find Most Helpful To Achieve Better Patient Outcomes Physicians could select more than one response A A A A A
  28. 28. Summary  The DAWN2 study is a multinational, multidisciplinary and multi-stakeholder survey − Conducted in 17 countries, on four continents, taking a 360° perspective − Importantly, the study includes family members of people with diabetes  Study goals are to: − Achieve a broader humanistic and societal perspective on the burden of diabetes − Provide a voice for people with diabetes and those caring for them, reflecting unmet needs and new opportunities − Identify areas for improvement and determine drivers of change towards person- centred diabetes care − Facilitate collaborative advocacy and action for the improvement of self-management and psychosocial support and related aspects of diabetes care and prevention  Findings from DAWN2 will impact on future research, clinical practice, and public policy

×