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Jeremy L. Mc Neal

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Jeremy L. Mc Neal

  1. 1. Methods of Motivation for Teachers and Students<br />Jeremy L. McNeal<br />
  2. 2. Who is motivated?<br />
  3. 3.
  4. 4. What is motivation?<br />
  5. 5. Direction<br />Reasons<br />Initiation<br />Morality<br />Tension Reduction<br />Altruism<br />MOTIVATION is defined as the reasons for engaging in a particular behavior.<br />Expectations<br />Persistence<br />Homeostasis or Equilibrium<br />Intensity<br />Control<br />Self-worth & Self-efficacy<br />
  6. 6. THEORIES OF MOTIVATION<br />CLASSIC<br />Motivation is the result of satisfying biological needs; an automatic consequence of the discrepancy between the current and desired states.<br />Tension reduction<br />Equilibrium<br />
  7. 7. THEORIES OF MOTIVATION<br />ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATION<br />In students, this is the the need for academic success or the attainment of excellence in an educational setting.<br />Situational (Extrinsic) <br />Vs.<br />Personal (Intrinsic)<br />
  8. 8. THEORIES OF MOTIVATION<br />INTRINSIC MOTIVATION<br />Motivation comes from the enjoyment of and interest in an activity for its own sake.<br />
  9. 9. THEORIES OF MOTIVATION<br />EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION<br />Motivation comes from the obtainment of some kind of external recognition.<br />Receive praise<br />Avoid punishment<br />
  10. 10. INTEREST<br />For motivation to occur, there must be some kind of interest in the outcomes of the tasks undertaken.<br />THEORIES OF MOTIVATION<br />
  11. 11. SELF-EFFICACY<br />The student must feel that he or she is capable of successfully completing the task at hand.<br />Task difficulty<br />Nearness of results<br />Clarity in the demands<br />THEORIES OF MOTIVATION<br />
  12. 12. ATTRIBUTIONS<br />The judgments that students make about their own success or failure. Attributions can be:<br />Internal or External<br />Specific or Global<br />THEORIES OF MOTIVATION<br />
  13. 13. Motivation in students<br />
  14. 14. Direction<br />Reasons<br />Initiation<br />Morality<br />Tension Reduction<br />Altruism<br />STUDENT MOTIVATION has to do with students’ desire to participate in the learning process.<br />Expectations<br />Persistence<br />ATTITUDES<br />Homeostasis or Equilibrium<br />Intensity<br />Control<br />Self-worth & Self-efficacy<br />
  15. 15. Attitudes are influenced by…<br />…home life & upbringing.<br />
  16. 16. Attitudes are influenced by…<br />…the social group.<br />
  17. 17. Attitudes are influenced by…<br />…past learning experiences.<br />
  18. 18. Attitudes are influenced by…<br />…teachers & learning institution.<br />
  19. 19. Unmotivated Students<br />
  20. 20. Unmotivated Students<br />Attention deficit<br />Behavioral problems<br />Cheating<br />Self-handicapping<br />Low participation<br />Withdrawal<br />TASK AVOIDANCE<br />
  21. 21. Some ideas for motivating students…<br />
  22. 22. Some Ideas for Motivating Students<br />Ask questions of students. <br />Survey their likes and interests.<br />
  23. 23. Some Ideas for Motivating Students<br />Encouragement and positive feedback<br />Try to find at least one positive aspect of a task a student completes.<br />
  24. 24. Some Ideas for Motivating Students<br />Make INTERNAL & GLOBAL attributions for success <br />Make students feel that their success comes from within and that it can be stable over time.<br />
  25. 25. Some Ideas for Motivating Students<br />Make EXTERNAL & SPECIFIC attributions for failure <br />Make students feel that failures are not necessarily their fault. Failure is task specific, not a trait of the student.<br />
  26. 26. Some Ideas for Motivating Students<br />Keep activites SHORT and SWEET, especially presentations.<br />Arrive with a caché of different activities that allows the class to flow.<br />
  27. 27. Some Ideas for Motivating Students<br />Selective Task Assignment<br />It isn’t necessary to assign the same tasks to every student in the same way.<br />
  28. 28. Some Ideas for Motivating Students<br />Empower students!<br />Let them choose what they want to do—sometimes—and base activities on their interests.<br />
  29. 29. And what about teachers?<br />
  30. 30. Unmotivated Teachers<br />Lack of Energy<br />Emotional Instability<br />Complaining Behaviors<br />Decline in Participation with Students<br />Depression<br />Hopelessness<br />
  31. 31. Unmotivated Teachers<br />
  32. 32. JOB DISSATISFACTION<br />Unmotivated Teachers<br />
  33. 33. REPEATED STUDENT FAILURES<br />Unmotivated Teachers<br />
  34. 34. PERSONAL PROBLEMS<br />Unmotivated Teachers<br />
  35. 35. Teacher Motivation<br />
  36. 36. Getting Motivated<br />SET REALISTIC EXPECTATIONS<br />Keep in mind the strengths and weaknesses of your current situation.<br />
  37. 37. Getting Motivated<br />MONITOR YOUR SUCCESSES<br />Attribute them to INTERNAL and GLOBAL reasons<br />
  38. 38. Getting Motivated<br />CONTINUE RECEIVING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT<br />
  39. 39. Getting Motivated<br />TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF<br />
  40. 40. Getting Motivated<br />GET SOCIAL SUPPORT<br />
  41. 41. Getting Motivated<br />REMEMBER THAT YOU ARE HUMAN<br />
  42. 42. Thank you!<br />Jeremy L. McNeal<br />jmcneal@colomboworld.com<br />

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