Recycle florida today june 10 2013

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Recycle florida today june 10 2013

  1. 1. Philadelphia: Recycling in the Streets Recycle Florida Today Annual Conference & Exhibition Presented By: Phil Bresee, City of Philadelphia Recycling Director June 10, 2013
  2. 2. About Philadelphia… • Founded 1682 by William Penn • Fifth-largest City in U.S. with 1.55 million residents • Metro area = ~6 million • Healthcare, financial services, tourism, refining, IT based economy (transitioning from manufacturing). • Renowned higher education system • “Global” city, rich in history, arts, culture, professional sports, etc.
  3. 3. Solid Waste Management in Philadelphia Commercial 1,833,298 64.6% Residential 636,027 22.4% C&D 370,699 13.1% 2011 MSW Generated by Sector Recycled 1,398,820 49.3% Landfilled 658,534 23.2% WTE 778,705 27.5% 2011 MSW Managed
  4. 4. Recycling in Philadelphia: Vintage 1990 to mid-2000’s • Recycling coordinator revolving door • Funding and staffing issues • Residential diversion rates in single-digits • Not a priority for most residents • Perceived to be too much trouble / inconvenient • Not clear what was really recyclable • No clear incentive • Fines were the most effective motivator
  5. 5. Solid Waste Management in Philadelphia 2013 • Residential MSW collected by Department of Streets: – $93.3 million budget – 1,200 employees – 200+ trucks (100% run on bio-diesel); 5 transfer sites – Street cleaning & litter can collections – Special event collections – Anti-litter programs • Weekly pickup from ~525,000 households • City collects from residential buildings with >6 units. • Streets & Walkways Education and Enforcement (SWEEP) officers enforce residential & commercial regulations.
  6. 6. Key Commonwealth & City Requirements & Policy Goals • PA Act 101 (1988) – Mandatory recycling for local governments 10,000+; includes commercial recycling requirements. • 35% commonwealth recycling goal • Act 101, Sections 901-904 annual reporting and grants programs ($2 million per year) • Solid Waste Management Plan (10 year planning horizons) • City ordinance requirements includes commercial recycling (1994). • Greenworks Philadelphia goals include 25% residential diversion rate and 70% landfill diversion rate.
  7. 7. Solid Waste Management in Philadelphia • 49.3% recycling rate for 2011. • 10.8% decrease in overall MSW generation 2007- 2011. • Overall recycling rate influenced by high C&D (~85%) & scrap metal recycling rates. 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Recycled & Composted 1,221,029 1,025,394 1,175,842 1,493,955 1,396,987 Disposed 1,964,247 1,771,033 1,495,412 1,437,419 1,443,037 - 500,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 2,000,000 2,500,000 3,000,000 3,500,000 TonsGenerated Philadelphia Overall MSW Generation & Recycling
  8. 8. Curbside Recycling Program • One of the 1st curbside recycling programs in U.S. (c. 1986) • Single-stream since 2008 • 120,000+ tons for 2012; ~457 lbs. per HH annual yield. • Recyclables accepted include: – Mixed paper & cardboard – Metal food & beverage cans – Plastics #1-7 – Glass bottles and jars – Aseptic cartons • Seasonal yard waste collection • Recyclables delivered to WM Forge MRF (LEED Silver) – $6.6 million in revenues FY 2012
  9. 9. Recycling Rewards Program • Philadelphia original Recyclebank pilot (2006) • Program became City-wide 2010 • ~190,000 households have signed up for the program • Outreach, events, and overall program visibility are key elements: – 2012 summer sweepstakes – City Council bin distribution events – America Recycles Day – Green Schools Project – U.S. Conference of Mayors Award
  10. 10. Other Initiatives & Programs • Public space recycling opportunities (920 Big-Belly sites). • Recycling drop-off centers at sanitation yards accept other materials: – Electronics – Household Hazardous Waste – Styrofoam • Insinkerator food waste project • Public event recycling: – 85% recycling/composting rate at 2012 Philadelphia Marathon
  11. 11. Commercial & Institutional Recycling • Commercial and institutional MSW stream of 2.2 million tons • Recycling mandated through PA Act 101 (City ordinance established 1994). • Businesses must file recycling plan (on- line), contract for services, provide appropriate bins, etc. $300 per day fine for non-compliance. • 50%+ commercial recycling rate although many gaps exist among small & medium sized businesses. • Private sector innovation: – C&D recycling – Organics recycling – Food waste
  12. 12. Recycling Revitalization Milestones… - 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 TonsperYear Residential Recyclables 2003-2012 Single- stream phase-inPlastics & OCC Weekly pickup #3-7 plastics Cartons Mayor Nutter electedRecyclebank pilots… Citywide single-stream Recyclebank goes Citywide
  13. 13. 2006: Single-stream phases-in…
  14. 14. 2008: Recycling Rebrand  Reflect innovation  Convey action
  15. 15. 2008: Easier still…weekly recycling
  16. 16. 2008: City-wide Single-Stream
  17. 17. 2008: By bus, trolley and train…
  18. 18. 2010: Website enhancements – www.PhiladelphiaStreets.com
  19. 19. 2010: Step it up with #3-7 plastics
  20. 20. 2010: Mural Arts Program branding adds visual excitement…
  21. 21. Future Recycling Initiatives & Challenges 70,594 13% 58,900 11% 401,286 76% Currently Recyclable Potential for Recycling Not Recyclable in Current Program • An additional 30K-40K tons needed from residential program to reach Greenworks goal. • City will need to target additional materials to push curbside diversion rates higher: – Household metals e.g. pots, pans, etc.? – Additional plastics? – Textiles (6% of MSW)? • Increase use of drop-off center network. • Increased public space recycling. • Examine options to increase recycling in multifamily communities. • New MRF contract FY 2015; recyclables sort needed.
  22. 22. Material 2000 2010 Difference 2010 vs. 2000 Paper & cardboard 29.0% 14.7% -14.3% Plastics 13.2% 10.0% -3.2% Glass 4.0% 1.9% -2.1% Metals 6.6% 3.5% -3.1% Organics 29.1% 27.2% -1.9% C&D 12.9% 24.1% 11.2% Other 5.2% 18.6% 13.4% Future Recycling Initiatives & Challenges • Business MSW services need continued paradigm shifting…(right-sizing) • High level (24% of MSW) of residentially- generated C&D must be addressed. • Continued decreases in current program materials. Philadelphia Residential MSW Composition
  23. 23. Future Recycling Initiatives & Challenges • Collection options (e.g. semi- automated & carts) due to narrow streets, housing density, and parking. • Collective bargaining rules • City already performs 1x week garbage pickup, so organics collections not the easiest sell. Photo courtesy of Peter Tobia
  24. 24. Strategic Initiatives and Programs • Solid Waste Management Plan rewrite • Reengaged Solid Waste and Recycling Advisory Committee • Explore partnerships with allied agencies, school district… • Continue to leverage and build public-private partnerships (Carton Council, U.S. Recycling Summit) • Alternative technologies assessment • Introduce “rebranded” outreach materials
  25. 25. Thanks RFT!!! phil.bresee@phila.gov

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