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Efficient or Just Busy?

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Efficient or Just Busy?

  1. 1. Efficient or Just Busy?Pawel Brodzinski@pawelbrodzinski
  2. 2. Hi, I’m PawelLunar Logichttp://llp.plSoftware ProjectManagementhttp://brodzinski.comTwitter@pawelbrodzinski
  3. 3. Once upona time…
  4. 4. Why?
  5. 5. 100% utilization
  6. 6. Cost of multitaskingSource: Gerald Weinberg, Quality Software Management:Vol. 1 System Thinking
  7. 7. Zeigarnik Effect:Tendency to experienceintrusive thought aboutan objective leftincompleteSource: S. Greist-Bousquet, N. Shiffman: The effect of taskinterrupton and closure on perceived duration
  8. 8. Cost of taskswitching is rootedin interference fromthoughts about the taskyour are not doingEyal Ophir
  9. 9. Time to market
  10. 10. Catching upUM… HOW DOES THISDARN CODE WORK,AGAIN?
  11. 11. MoremistakesSource: E. Ophir, C. Nass, A. Wagner:Cognitive control in media multitaskers
  12. 12. On a highway
  13. 13. In a call center
  14. 14. BallFlowGame
  15. 15. No WIP Limits
  16. 16. Using WIP Limits
  17. 17. Total time: 25% betterAverage cycle time: 60% betterPredictability*: 90% better*Standard deviation
  18. 18. Not the whole truth
  19. 19. Cuttingcorners
  20. 20. Not sustainable
  21. 21. Why something that intuitiveseems so counterintuitivewhen we talk aboutmanagement?
  22. 22. …and they livedhappily everafter
  23. 23. 5OWIP limits!
  24. 24. Average cycle time: 50% betterPessimistic scenario: 53% betterPredictability*: 65% better*80th percentile
  25. 25. Why?
  26. 26. Slack time
  27. 27. Automation
  28. 28. Code quality
  29. 29. Simpleconfiguration
  30. 30. Self-balancingteam
  31. 31. Slack time introduced byWIP limits drives continuousimprovement
  32. 32. When introducingWIP limits start with2x average WIPDon Reinertsen
  33. 33. Cost of rejected work: 1% worseCost of idle capacity: 1% worseAverage cycle time: 28% betterSource: Don Reinertsen, #lkce12 keynoteWIP Limit = 2x Average WIP
  34. 34. Cost of rejected work: 13% worseCost of idle capacity: 11% worseAverage cycle time: 72% betterSource: Don Reinertsen, #lkce12 keynoteWIP Limit = 0.5x Average WIP
  35. 35. Are aggressiveWIP limitsuseful?2O
  36. 36. What’s the useof slack time?
  37. 37. Idletimeonly?
  38. 38. Helpingothers
  39. 39. Learning
  40. 40. Systemimprovements!
  41. 41. Cost of rejected workWhat’s the value of rejectedwork?
  42. 42. More than a halfthe features in largesoftware products gounusedSource: Victor R. Basili, Barry Boehm, COTS-Based Systems Top 10 List
  43. 43. Cost of idle capacityIs that capacity really wasted?
  44. 44. Employees possessthe ability for creativeproblem solving, but theirtalents are underused inmost organizationsSource: Douglas McGregor, Theory Y
  45. 45. Average cycle timeWhat happens to cycle timethanks to improvements?
  46. 46. COSTOFDELAYLONG-TERMVALUE
  47. 47. COSTOFDELAYProject andproductworkLONG-TERMVALUE
  48. 48. COSTOFDELAYProject andproductworkSystemimprovementsLONG-TERMVALUE
  49. 49. COSTOFDELAYProject andproductworkSystemimprovementsLONG-TERMVALUE
  50. 50. Takeouts
  51. 51. 100% utilization is a myth1OO%
  52. 52. Introducing WIP limits resultsin improved efficiency
  53. 53. Slack time sets us on path ofcontinuous improvement
  54. 54. Efficient doesn’t mean busyBusy doesn’t mean efficient
  55. 55. Thank youPawel Brodzinskiblog.brodzinski.comllp.pl@pawelbrodzinski

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