Successfully reported this slideshow.

Deescalating hostile and abusive language 2022 (3 hours)

0

Share

Loading in …3
×
1 of 59
1 of 59

Deescalating hostile and abusive language 2022 (3 hours)

0

Share

Download to read offline

This slide pack goes beyond the realm of dealing with just DIFFICULT PEOPLE. Here we look at strategies on understanding the mindset of an angry, abusive and mentally ill person and how to de-escalate situations before they get out of control.

This slide pack goes beyond the realm of dealing with just DIFFICULT PEOPLE. Here we look at strategies on understanding the mindset of an angry, abusive and mentally ill person and how to de-escalate situations before they get out of control.

More Related Content

Related Books

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

Deescalating hostile and abusive language 2022 (3 hours)

  1. 1. f De-escalating Hostile and violent language I PAY YOUR [add expletive here] WAGES! thepresentationcoach.com.au/login Download ALL Resources here For all resources from today Facilitator: Gerald Pauschmann
  2. 2. All the resources
  3. 3. Today we will get clear about •MITIGATING DANGER •WHY WE GET ANGRY •WHAT TO DO •WHAT TO SAY •COMMUNICATION WITH THE MENTALLY ILL
  4. 4. Neutral Angry Relaxed Happy Content Thrill Agitated Not Happy Upset Violent Hostile Abusive Excitement Euphoria Settle down I’m an authorised officer There is nothing I can do You are entitled To your opinion You have to I can’t Unfortunately That’s not our job No
  5. 5. Natural and practices skills of handling the wide spectrum of callers Essential: Good attitude Positive regard for all people A capacity and ability to use empathy Recognise: There are customers who experience difficulty in conforming to what is expected of them. This may be due to cognitive impairment—for example, delirium, psychosis, intoxication, and intellectual disability Practiced or life experiences: Resilience Mental toughness TAC / NVC Courage Confidence
  6. 6. • What are you thinking • How will you approach the situation • What is your introduction • What will be your opening statement / question
  7. 7. De- escalation skills that DON’T work Debate the facts Ask “why” questions Jump to conclusions Rush Use sarcasm Criticize and blame Impose your value judgments Nag and preach Counterpunch
  8. 8. Get to the customer before the customer gets to you Good morning sir/madam, I just noticed you were taking videos, BTW we don’t have an issue with that but could I just ask that you be mindful that there maybe some people that could take offence to you taking images of them or even their children. I hope you get some great shots, if you need anything I’ll be ‘over there’
  9. 9. 5 universal TRUTHS of human interaction All people want is to be: 1. Treated with dignity and respect 2. ASKED rather than TOLD to do something 3. To feel IMPORTANT 4. Offered OPTIONS rather than threats 5. Given a chance to be heard Dr. George Thompson
  10. 10. Today we will get clear about •WHY WE GET ANGRY
  11. 11. The seven levels of escalating anger Frustration Defensive anger Difficult angry people Hostility Rage Violence Threats
  12. 12. All behaviour has a purpose – to fulfil a NEED • Power • Revenge • Attention seeking • Hopelessness • Conformity NEED – DESTRUCTIVE BEHAVIOUR RELIEF – INSTANT GRATIFICATION
  13. 13. Where does our aggression stem from? • DNA? • Upbringing • Environment • Learned • Past experiences • Circumstances • Cultural
  14. 14. Why are people ANGRY
  15. 15. Masks of anger • Shame • Hurt • Fear • Anxiety • Sadness • Guilt • Insecurity • Jealousy • Embarrassed • Rejected
  16. 16. Today we will get clear about WHAT TO DO
  17. 17. TALK TO THEM WALK AWAY BEAT THEM UP / ARGUE
  18. 18. THINK ABOUT THE DECISIONS YOU ARE MAKING E F S L Will it stand up to SCRUNITY from the Community? Is it ETHICAL and ensure compliance with standards and procedures? Is it LAWFUL? Consider the bi- laws, regulations and legislations. Is it FAIR? Consider the community, your family and colleagues.
  19. 19. Our first PRIORITY Stay safe
  20. 20. Work Health and Safety Act 2011 Work Health and Safety Regulation 2011 WH&S Safe Plan Tactical Assertive Communication and Non-Violent Communication
  21. 21. Today we will get clear about WHAT TO SAY
  22. 22. So… What are your customers NOT HAPPY with What are your customers saying to you that is rude, oppositional or disrespectful?
  23. 23. When you approach agitated customers, you must monitor your own emotional and physiologic response so as to remain calm and, therefore, be capable of performing verbal de- escalation.
  24. 24. STRATEGY • STOP them from abusing you • ACKNOWLEDGE they are (emotion) • Reflect on WHAT THEY ARE NOT HAPPY WITH • Tell them YOUR ROLE • Give them your OUTCOME
  25. 25. What would you say? • You can’t tell me what to do • I pay your wages • I know the Mayor • You’re a RACIST. • Get me someone older • I’m not talking to a woman • What you are doing is illegal under the constitution. I am a sovereign citizen • You are all corrupt. • You have NO idea what it’s like to bring up children these days
  26. 26. STRATEGY • STOP them from abusing you • ACKNOWLEDGE they are (emotion) • Reflect on WHAT THEY ARE NOT HAPPY WITH • Tell them YOUR ROLE • Give them your OUTCOME
  27. 27. Neutral Angry Relaxed Happy Content Thrill Agitated Not Happy Upset Violent Hostile Abusive Excitement Euphoria Settle down I’m an authorised officer There is nothing I can do You are entitled To your opinion You have to I can’t Unfortunately That’s not our job No
  28. 28. Things you can do to handle someone else’s anger Breathe Remain calm Think outcome Make an effort to open up the communication Get more polite without Being patronising or condescending Validate their concerns Agree with them Use humour* IGNORE – AGREE – EMPATHISE – QUESTION – INVITE CRITICISM Don’t take it personally
  29. 29. Agreeing with them! Miller's Law Miller's law states, “To understand what another person is saying, you must assume assume that it is true and try to imagine what it could be true of.” Is the quickest way to de-escalate a HSP
  30. 30. All the resources LinkedIn
  31. 31. You Council Acknowledge Clarify Reality Action
  32. 32. SYSTEM I can see You seem That must be I sense You’re… And you think what you would like me to do is… So what you are telling me is… The way you see things is… I know you aren’t making it personal The situation is this That doesn’t exempt you Here’s the thing The legislation Councils stand… You cannot So you need to listen carefully This is what we are going to do I suggest that you I’d like to keep this conversation respectful Allow me to do my job and get you… ACKNOWLEDGE ACTION REALITY CLARIFY
  33. 33. Today we will get clear about MITIGATING DANGER
  34. 34. Your responses: Deal with the difficult behaviour, not the person 1 Respond to the difficult behaviour rather than reacting to it 2 Choose appropriate responses to the other person’s behaviour 3
  35. 35. Don’t react to emotional outbursts 1 Allow people to let off steam 2 Listen actively & acknowledge what is being said 3 Explain, offer alternatives 4
  36. 36. Remember:  Don’t take the BAIT  Don’t get drawn into the other person’s power games  Maintain your self control  Clarify any vague or general statements to determine just what the other person is saying
  37. 37. Today we will get clear about COMMUNICATING WITH THE MENTALLY ILL
  38. 38. Mental illness alone does not increase the risk of violence, but when mental illness is combined with other risk factors such as substance abuse, it does increase the risk of violence.
  39. 39. The highest risk for violence was found in those who had mental illness, a substance abuse problem, and a history of violence. Research showed this group had 10 times the risk of violence than those who only had mental illness.
  40. 40. Actively listen by validating how person feels: • Redirect the conversation from discussion of events to talking about feelings and emotions. • Example: “It sounds like you have a lot of feelings about this. That makes sense to me.” Communication strategies
  41. 41. Ask if events have triggered memories of other situations or events: • Memories may provoke painful emotions and negative behaviours (withdrawal, avoidance, hyper-vigilance) as ways to cope with these events • Examples: “Have you found yourself thinking about things from the past?” or “Have you been in similar situations before?”
  42. 42. Avoid clinical, diagnostic and pathological language: • You may see symptoms of clinical issues such as anxiety, depression, and PTSD, but steer away from language that connects to diagnosis • Example: Instead of saying “That’s your depression talking,” say “Those kinds of feelings are normal.”
  43. 43. Communicate person to person rather than “expert” to “victim:” • Use straightforward terms • Foster rapport and trust by expressing genuine concern rather than the expert position of treating them as a victim of an event • Example: This is a really difficult time. I’ve been wondering how today has affected you” or “How have you been coping with all of this?”
  44. 44. Foster resilience: • A strengths-based approach can promote long-term recovery by helping patients/clients adapt to traumatic events • The path to resilience varies from person to person • Example: “I’ve seen you get through a lot of hard times -- we can figure out this one too.”
  45. 45. Encourage customer to minimise their exposure to media coverage: • Extensive media coverage can exacerbate negative emotions and serve as constant reminders of what happened • Place media coverage into context and remind them that there are also positive things occurring in the world • Example: “I wonder if you and the kids could use a break from all the TV news. • How about turning off the TV and doing some activities with them tonight?”
  46. 46. Understand your comfort level with dealing with violent traumatic events: • Our own emotions can be triggered by the work you do. Get help from co-workers or other practitioners to talk through your responses • Avoid discussing the situation, staff opinions or interpretation of the events in the presence of the public. This can inflame and evoke conflict. • Find a trusted co-worker to share your feelings with -- away from customer contact areas.
  47. 47. Phrases you could use depending on the situation I want to work with you but I need you to be helpful. I can help you with that but I need you to hear me out Let me see if I heard you correctly Tell me what has got you so upset Will you allow me to try to help you with your concerns I would if I could but I’m not authorised to do that I would really like to help you with that but only the courts can do that

×