Issue III, 2004
Fun Ways to Work
Exercise into Your
Daily Routine10
Fun Ways to Work
Exercise into Your
Daily Routine10
Fu...
““The rThe race is not alwace is not always to the swiftays to the swift...but to those who k...but to those who keep on r...
FITNESS
8 10 Innovative Ways to Exercise
You don’t need to set aside a big chunk of
time—our “fitness bursts” will fit rig...
Joint pain can make it hard to perform many of the activities you
enjoy. That’s why you must be clear with your doctor abo...
PERFORM 9
Exercise
FITNESS
8 PERFORM
Exercise
FITNESS
Plan a nature walk to a
romantic spot at the beach
or in the woods, ...
PERFORM 1110 PERFORM
Lak e Tahoe: A Natural American Treasure
by Jodie Gould
64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:35 PM Page 10
O
f all the states in the Southwest, Nevada has had the
hardest time keeping up with the Joneses (you try com-
peting with...
Where to Stay When You‘re in Lake Tahoe
The accommodations in Lake Tahoe vary from the tacky to
the wacky to plush casino ...
“I thought, if this is the main thing you get in return for being
first, she can have it!”
From that point on, Sullivan wa...
Mission: Possible
FAMILY & LIVING
Completed in 1984 during Challenger mission STS-41G
(Ride’s second flight), Sullivan’s t...
20 PERFORM
More on
Sally Ride‘s
organizations
TO JOIN THE SALLY RIDE CLUB:
www.SallyRideClub.com
Phone: (858) 638-1432
e-m...
Choosing a Health Club
FITNESS
Choosing a Health Club
FITNESS
Pilates is an exercise program that works every
muscle in th...
PERFORM 25
T
he sharp odor of pitch pine hangs in the air, along
with distant echoes of an unseen woodchopper.
The quiet s...
PERFORM 27
Patriot Lanes
TRAVEL & LEISURE
After a nine-day siege by American and French troops under
General George Washin...
PERFORM 2928 PERFORM
the doctor is in
The Modern Management
of Arthritis Pain
the doctor is in
Q: What are the most common...
PERFORM 31
best remembered for his mesmerizing performance as Sonny
Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola’s legendary Godfather...
PERFORM 33
James Caan
COVER STORY
“Medicine is moving right along.” He should know—he sits on
the board of the Joan Englis...
“The race is not always to the swift...but to those who keep on running.”
“Act as if it were impossible to fail.”
““WWe co...
PERFORM 37
Grape Expectations
TRAVEL & LEISURE
36 PERFORM
Grape Expectations
TRAVEL & LEISURE
The father of American wine
...
bright thinking
38 PERFORM
TIPS & TRENDS
PERFORM 39
TIPS & TRENDS
“Optimists coped by taking a negative situation and turn...
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  1. 1. Issue III, 2004 Fun Ways to Work Exercise into Your Daily Routine10 Fun Ways to Work Exercise into Your Daily Routine10 Fun Festival GETAWAYSAround the Country Fun Festival GETAWAYSAround the Country How to Choose a Health Club That’s Right for You How to Choose a Health Club That’s Right for You SPICE UP YOUR SUMMER With Quick and Easy Barbecue Recipes Cycle Your Way Through American History SPICE UP YOUR SUMMER With Quick and Easy Barbecue Recipes Explore Scenic Lake Tahoe THINK POSITIVE: It Can Help You Live Longer! THINK POSITIVE It Can Help You Live Longer! Astronaut Sally Ride’s New Mission Astronaut Sally Ride’s New Mission James CaanHe’s made over seventy films without missing a day of work, and now he has a hit TV series. He’s back on top, and still going strong. James CaanHe’s made over seventy films without missing a day of work, and now he has a hit TV series. He’s back on top, and still going strong. 64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:18 PM Page 1
  2. 2. ““The rThe race is not alwace is not always to the swiftays to the swift...but to those who k...but to those who keep on runningeep on running..”” “Act as if it were impossible to fail.” “We come to feel as we behave.” “The race is not always to the swift...but to those who keep on running.”“The race is not always to the swift...but to those who keep on running.” ––Author UnknoAuthor Unknownwn –Dorothy Broude –Paul Pearsall –Author Unknown Proud to support individuals living life in the moment. BEXTRA.com 64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:20 PM Page 2
  3. 3. FITNESS 8 10 Innovative Ways to Exercise You don’t need to set aside a big chunk of time—our “fitness bursts” will fit right into your daily routine. 22 Reflection in the Mirror How to choose a health club that reflects your style and fitness goals. GARDENING & NATURE 10 Lake Tahoe: A Natural American Treasure Explore its alpine beauty hiking hundreds of miles of new trails. Or treat yourself to a romantic lake cruise. There’s something for everyone—fine cuisine, top-notch hotels, and a variety of indoor and outdoor activities. FAMILY & LIVING 15 Mission: Possible Twenty years after becoming the first woman in space, Sally Ride has a new mission—to get other females interested in the traditionally male fields of math, science, and technology. 45 Your Monthly Money Calendar Our month-by-month to-do list shows you easy ways to organize your finances. TRAVEL & LEISURE 25 Patriot Lanes Wheel your way through American history on a bicycle trip through Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown, Virginia. 35 Grape Expectations: Virginia Wines Come of Age Escape the ordinary with a wine-tasting tour of the up-and-coming vineyards of Virginia. 47 Festival Getaways No matter where your interests lie, there is probably a festival for you somewhere around the country. HEALTH 6 Take the Treatment Challenge Is your arthritis pain medication everything it should be? 28 The Doctor Is In Pain Specialist Dr. Jeffrey Gudin answers important questions about arthritis. 42 Emerging from the Shadows of Pain The development of drugs that target the COX-2 enzyme has revolutionized the treatment of arthritis and other types of pain. TIPS & TRENDS 38 Bright Thinking Optimists are not only happier, they’re healthier, too. Even better, they may live longer. 40 The Thrill of the Grill Spice up your summer with these simple but delicious barbecue recipes, which can be prepared in minutes. THE LIGHTER SIDE 52 Getting to Know You! Our fun quiz will help you get to know yourself better. Contents 10 From the Editor Welcome to PERFORM™ . This magazine is dedicated to and written for people who want to live life to the fullest. If we had a motto, it would be something Alexander Woolcott once said: “There is no such thing in anyone’s life as an unimportant day.” No matter who you are—whether you are a parent, an artist, a world traveler, or a volunteer—you want to be able to do what you want to do, when you want to do it. Because maintaining an active life is essential to good health, we have packed these pages with ideas and experiences to feed your imagination. From exploring the world around you by taking a bike trip through American history, to understanding the latest advances in pain medicine, to seeing how America’s first female astronaut has chosen to give something back to the community, we hope to show you some innovative ways you may not have thought of to get the most out of your life, whatever your lifestyle, hobbies, or career may be. 15 10 3535 47 1525 30 2222 25 47 3838 4040 4545 2828 COVER STORY 30 THE PROS OF BEING CAAN Legendary actor, free spirit, and dedicated father James Caan still writes his own rules, and shows no signs of slowing down. 30 64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:22 PM Page 4
  4. 4. Joint pain can make it hard to perform many of the activities you enjoy. That’s why you must be clear with your doctor about how joint pain affects your life. Just follow these three simple steps: 1 ANSWER THE TREATMENT CHALLENGE QUESTIONS TO THE RIGHT. Take a moment to think about how you now treat your joint pain. Then check the Yes or No boxes to the right. 2 SHARE THE RESULTS WITH YOUR DOCTOR. Tell your doctor if you’re not getting all the relief you need. 3 DISCUSS HOW YOU WILL TREAT YOUR ARTHRITIS JOINT PAIN. Your Treatment Challenge answers may suggest that it’s time to rethink how you manage joint pain. Are you hitting your arthritis joint pain hard enough? Take the Treatment Challenge now! How many Yes answers did you have? If one or more, talk to your doctor today about options for controlling joint pain. 1 I could not effectively control my arthritis pain. 2 My arthritis pain seemed worse than usual. 3 My arthritis pain interfered with my ability to: a. walk on a level surface. b. go up or down stairs. c. bend over. d. get in or out of a car. e. get in or out of bed. f. perform light chores. g. perform heavy chores. 4 My arthritis pain interfered with my ability to: a. sleep. b. play my favorite sport(s). c. perform daily activities such as shopping. HAVE YOU EXPERIENCED ANY OF THE FOLLOWING IN THE PAST MONTH? Yes No Important Information. BEXTRA is not for everyone. Prescription BEXTRA should not be taken if you’ve had allergic reactions to certain drugs called sulfonamides, aspirin or other arthritis medicines or if you’ve had aspirin- sensitive asthma or are in late pregnancy. It is not recommended if you have advanced kidney disease. Tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver problems. In rare cases, serious stomach problems such as bleeding can occur without warning. Tell your doctor right away if you develop blisters in the mouth or a rash, as it can be a sign of a serious skin reaction that may be life threatening. If you experience other unusual symptoms while taking BEXTRA, tell your doctor immediately. The most common side effects are headache, abdominal pain, indigestion, upper respiratory infection, nausea and diarrhea. Please see important Product Information on page 54. For more information, call toll-free 1-866-864-2600, visit www.BEXTRA.com or mail the Get More Information card between pages 50 and 51. Please see important product information on previous page. PERFORM 7 64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:34 PM Page 6
  5. 5. PERFORM 9 Exercise FITNESS 8 PERFORM Exercise FITNESS Plan a nature walk to a romantic spot at the beach or in the woods, and bring along a picnic lunch. This is a fun activity that can have great rewards. Park your car at your last stop, not your first, so you won’t be tempted to drive from one spot to the next. If you end up loaded with packages halfway through your errands, make a detour to your car, park the bags, then walk briskly to the next store on your list. Instead of taking the elevator, use the stairs. Remember the mantra, “One up, two down,” meaning you should try to take the stairs whenever you are going up only one flight, or down two. If you want to exercise, but can’t find a way to squeeze it into your busy schedule, don’t worry—you don’t really need to set aside a big chunk of time. Research shows that frequent, short bursts of exercise add up, and a bunch of fitness bursts give you almost the same health and weight-loss benefits as one longer exercise session. With that in mind, PERFORM™ magazine has come up with some easy, innovative exercises that can be incorporated into your daily routine—a few minutes at a time! 1 2 Use those downtimes when you’re waiting for a file to print, a Web page to load, or an e-mail to arrive to push back from your desk and stretch your muscles. Try a few knee extensions. While sitting upright in your chair, extend your left leg out as straight as you can, pause for a few seconds, and then return to your starting position. Do ten or fifteen extensions with each leg. Walk around the block as briskly as possible. You’ll gain energy, both physically and mentally, and do better work when you get back. At four miles per hour, you can burn a hundred calories in fifteen minutes. stretchonline 7 Put on your dancing shoes. At the next wedding, bar mitz- vah, or birthday party you attend, get on the dance floor and move your body. An hour of social dancing can burn 230 to 390 calories, so get out there and have fun! get footloose 3 energy boost 6 If you don’t have a dog, maybe now’s the time to get one—or offer to walk your neighbor’s. The neigh- bor will owe you a favor, and you’ll burn plenty of calories, especially if the dog is young, speedy, and determined. Make sure to wear comfortable shoes and enjoy the fresh air. 8 If you’re home alone on a rainy day and are looking for some- thing to do, head to the attic or basement and do some useful “busywork.” Pack up books, maga- zines, or clothes to donate to the local library, hospital, or shelter. It’s a great way to help out your local charities, and the light lift- ing will help with your goals to get moving. 10picnictime 5 Tighten your gluteals (rear end muscles) anytime you’re stuck waiting—in the post office line, at the dentist’s office, wherever. You can do these sitting or standing, but if the person behind you winks or grins, you may be attracting more attention than you think. squeezes subtle 9 Work out to your favorite TV pro- gram.Walk on a treadmill or ride an exercise bike while the program is on. If you don’t own this equip- ment, lie on the floor and do some stretching exercises on the rug. Lie flat on your back and pull your knee toward your chest, keeping your head on the floor. Hold for twenty seconds. Repeat with the other knee. 4 shoptillyoudrop innovative ways to e x e r c i s e1010 w alk a do g wor k the ho use t v trainin g Be sure to check with your doctor before starting an exercise program. 64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:35 PM Page 8
  6. 6. PERFORM 1110 PERFORM Lak e Tahoe: A Natural American Treasure by Jodie Gould 64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:35 PM Page 10
  7. 7. O f all the states in the Southwest, Nevada has had the hardest time keeping up with the Joneses (you try com- peting with the Grand Canyon and the Tetons!). Sure, it’s home to Las Vegas, one of the glitziest, most visited cities in the country, but I believe that Lake Tahoe is the jewel in the crown of the state. Long considered a playground for Reno res- idents and Californians (it straddles the California and northern Nevada border), Lake Tahoe should be on every serious travel- er’s itinerary when exploring America’s natural treasures. Tahoe has undergone some major renovations in order to evolve from a world-class ski resort with a smattering of casinos into a destination for adventure and eco-tourism. For starters, some of the strip motels in the Stateline area that seemed incongruous amid the beauty of the lake have been replaced by higher-end, more aesthetically pleasing accommodations such as the Grand Summit Resort. My husband and I visited in May, considered the “shoulder month” between ski season and summer, and therefore the slow- est period for tourism. Coming from New York City, the absence of crowds didn’t bother us a bit, and the weather, except for one day when it snowed, was sublime. A warm blanket of sun enveloped us when we stepped out of the shade, and the mild spring temperature was conducive to physical activities. Although snow can fall in any given month, the Tahoe Basin enjoys 274 sunny days annually. It was too early in the year to swim in the Lake Tahoe GARDENING & NATURE Lake Tahoe GARDENING & NATURE PERFORM 1312 PERFORM lake, of course, which at an average depth of 989 feet is the third deepest in North America. Only in the summer will it warm up to a refreshing 68 degrees Fahrenheit. Residents also boast that the lake is 99 percent pure—an amazing statistic when you consider the nearly two million people who visit its shores each year. The new Tahoe Rim Trail One of the best reasons to come to Lake Tahoe, aside from the skiing, is to visit the Tahoe Rim Trail (TRT), to take in the eye- popping vistas from the ridgeline of America’s largest alpine lake. Prior to September 2001, only a small portion of the 150-mile ridgeline that loops around the magnificent alpine lake was acces- sible to hikers, bikers, and backcountry explorers. You might feel like yodeling as you peek between the pines, firs, and aspens at the snowcapped mountains, which look remarkably like the Alps—without the cheese and cowbells. Our guides took us for a moderate hike on a well-marked path, pointing out the spring wildflowers and towering, 9,735-foot Mount Tallac in the distance. The TRT has no lean-tos, only one campsite, and numerous well-marked trails to choose from, each offering spectacular vistas. I was surprised to learn that the idea for blazing the TRT was conceived as recently as 1977. It was the brainchild of U.S. Forester Glenn Hampton, who wondered why only 30 percent of the land in the area had been made into paths. Hampton, an avid hiker, set out to find other possible rim trail routes. He researched the pathways used by early pioneers, Basque shepherds, and Washoe Indians, the region’s original inhabitants. The Tahoe Rim Trail Foundation was formed four years later to recruit volun- teers, raise funds, and galvanize local and national support for the project. Those wishing to trek the complete trail route should plan on taking two weeks to do so, keeping in mind that the nights can be cold and snow can fall at any time (you might even run into a black bear or two). The best times to hike are early to mid-July for wildflowers and September for spectacular fall foliage. There is no need to register to hike the entire TRT, but you may want to join the Tahoe Rim Trail Association, so you can become a member of the Tahoe Rim Trail 150 Mile Club once you’ve fin- ished hiking the entire trail. You will be listed in the association’s newsletter and given a signed map to hang on your wall. Thousands of people, from schoolchildren to the elderly, have volunteered their time and physical labor to clear paths and maintain the trail. If you’d rather put your money where your machete is, sections of the trail are available for adoption through the TRT “Adopt-a-Mile Program.” You can memorialize a friend, family member, or business through a donation that will be acknowledged by two trailhead kiosks and in brochures that cover your adopted mile. You will also get a framed photograph of your little slice of heaven. Squaw Valley’s High Camp Located in North Lake Tahoe, a breathtaking half-hour drive from the South Lake, is Squaw Valley, which became interna- tionally recognized as the site of the 1960 Winter Olympics. The North Shore is more residential than the South and just as beau- tiful. Drive during the day so you can experience the vertigo- inducing switchbacks, which remind me of the scenic winding roads of the French Riviera. Be sure to stop off for a hike down to Emerald Bay, where you can stroll along the beach in front of a Viking-style mansion built by a local socialite named Lora Josephine Knight. Mrs. Knight converted a small island (the lake’s only one) into a tearoom, where she entertained guests. Weather and vandalism have since worn away most of the tearoom, but a small turret remains. Like South Lake Tahoe, Squaw Valley underwent a major ren- ovation, with the installation of another six-passenger chairlift and a thirteen-acre mountain village at the base, with 640 new mountain homes, as well as new shops and restaurants. In addi- tion to skiing, snowboarding, tubing, and other winter activities, you can enjoy year-round ice-skating at Squaw Valley’s Olympic- sized Ice Pavilion, tennis, rock climbing, and swimming. We took the cable car to the High Camp Health and Fitness Spa, located at 8,200 feet, and watched from the heated outdoor lagoon and hot tub as a group of skiers went on their last few runs of the season. During the summer, there is plenty of hiking, mountain biking, golfing, and horseback riding, and there is a fireworks show at High Camp on July 4. Cruising the lake No trip to Tahoe is complete without at least one boat ride, so when you’re not skiing, hiking, or gambling at the casinos, you should be cruising around the lake. There are two major boats to choose from. One is the M.S. Dixie II, which offers breakfast and champagne brunch cruises from April to October and sunset dinner/dance and sightseeing excursions year-round. The boat launches out of Zephyr Cove Resort and RV Park, just four miles north of Stateline, Nevada, on Highway 50. We took the three-and-a-half-hour sunset dinner/dance cruise to Emerald Bay, which included wine, a three-course dinner, and live music in the disco/bar area. We shoved off at seven o’clock with a tour group from England and several starry-eyed couples. This gave us about an hour of daylight to stroll on the upper deck and watch the sun slip behind the Sierra Nevada Mountains. For those who prefer to stay inside, there are tables with views on both sides and a wet bar. The paddleboat takes you over to Emerald Bay, a cove of pine trees, eagle nests, and Mrs. Knight’s castle. Although the food on board is nothing to rave about, the friendly staff, excellent band, and well-timed events make for a true pleasure trip. The other, even larger cruise operation is run by Hornblower Cruises and Events, which also operates out of San Francisco, Los Angeles, and San Diego. Like the Dixie II, the Tahoe Queen offers a three-hour sunset cruise to Emerald Bay with wine, din- ner, and live music. Unlike the Dixie II, operators say it is a real paddleboat in which the big wheels actually provide the source of its movement. (Both boats have a glass bottom portion where you can view the marine life below.) Hornblower also offers family dinner cruises, a family Emerald Bay cruise where kids ride for free, a heritage tour of the renowned architectural sights in the region, a shuttle to Squaw Valley on the north side of the lake, and, for the ultimate in luxurious living, private charters. We took a spin on the Paradise Hornblower, a dining yacht that accommodates weddings, business events, and parties with anywhere from two to two thousand guests. As I sat, cocktail in hand on the sun-kissed deck, watching my husband don the cap- tain’s hat and pretend to navigate through the silky blue waters, I allowed myself to imagine that the vessel was ours (“I am the queen of the world!”), at least for the duration of the cruise. A nugget of the Old West If you’ve never been to an Old West town, or you’re traveling with children, take a day trip to Virginia City, a popular tourist destination forty minutes outside Lake Tahoe. This mining town offers a nugget of the Old West, although it has sacrificed some of its historic charm to T-shirts, fudge shops, and western sou- venirs. Located in Seven Mile Canyon, also known as “The Hill,” you can see the Stillwater Mountains seventy miles to the east and the Humbolts, twice as far away. Stroll on the original boardwalk that runs through Main Street. You can see where the brilliant Mark Twain worked briefly as a newspaper reporter for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. Look for faded signs on the sides of buildings, such as the one advertising the newspaper, as the few unadulterated vestiges of America’s pioneer past. Another historical landmark is the old Piper’s Opera House, and don’t skip the musty Mark Twain Bookstore, where you will find an excellent collection of western books and an adorable long-haired cat that will greet you at the door. On your way out of town stop off at Silver City, three miles down the mountain, which is older and more authentic looking than the commercial- ized Virginia City. Silver mines still dot the hilly landscape, and you can see where the mountains have been whittled away by centuries of prospecting. For more information about the TRT, contact the Tahoe Rim Trail Association at (775) 298-0012, or visit its Web site at www.tahoerimtrail.org. To book a cruise on the M.S. Dixie II, call (775) 588-3508, or visit www.tahoedixie2.com. For Hornblower cruises and events, call (800) ON THE BAY, or visit www.hornblower.com. Jodie Gould writes about travel, health, and popular culture for a variety of magazines. 64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:36 PM Page 12
  8. 8. Where to Stay When You‘re in Lake Tahoe The accommodations in Lake Tahoe vary from the tacky to the wacky to plush casino hotels and rustic bed-and-breakfasts. Choose according to your personal style and checkbook. Inn by the Lake 3300 Lake Tahoe Boulevard South Lake Tahoe, Calif. 96150 (800) 877-1466; (530) 542-0330 www.innbythelake.com This well-run, tastefully decorated inn trumpets its “rooms with a beautiful view,” and it is, in fact, located right across Highway 50 from the lake. Not all rooms have lake views, however, so ask for an upper floor with a view when you make your reserva- tion. The rooms have refrigerators and two-sink bathrooms, and the inn provides an outdoor heated pool, whirlpool spa, washing machines and dryers, and a generous, complimentary continental breakfast in the garden room. In keeping with Lake Tahoe’s environmental consciousness, guests have the option of reusing towels and sheets to conserve water and energy. During our stay, there was a lovely wine-and-cheese reception for those who wished to meet the management and their fellow guests. Rates range from $98 to $355 off-season and between $112 and $635 during high season. Special packages and group rates are available. Fantasy Inn 3696 Lake Tahoe Boulevard South Lake Tahoe, Calif. 96150 (800) 367-7736; (530) 541-4200 www.fantasyinn.com Lovers will want to book a theme room in this hotel dedicated to romance! Couples can choose from various kitschy themes designed to cater to their particular fantasy. These include Arabian Nights (desert theme, with tiger-print carpet, five-foot whirlpool spa, a round king-size bed, and tent-style ivory drapes); the Tropical Treehouse (cozy island bungalow with tropical motif); Graceland (the largest theme room, with a spacious sitting area, heart-shaped spa, and bright red color scheme); and Romeo & Juliet (a hidden castle retreat with classic bridal decor). Many rooms come with fireplaces, love seats, and refrigerators, and all have ceiling-hung TVs. It is really quite fun if you get into the spirit of things. My husband and I stayed in the Penthouse, which has a sophisticated, Art Deco decor. It had a work- ing gas fireplace that warmed up the room with the simple flick of a switch, a sunken whirlpool bathtub the size of a kiddie pool, and a double jet shower. Mirrors surround the king-size bed and hover unself- consciously above the ceiling, and hanging plants and statues give the room a feeling of sensuous luxury. The hotel offers complete wedding packages with clergy, chapel ceremony, bou- quets, wedding photos, and other mementos for those tying the knot for the first time or renewing their vows ($599 to $1,500). Room rates range from $159 to $771. Tahoe Lakeshore Lodge & Spa 930 Bal Bijou Road South Lake Tahoe, Calif. 96150 (800) 448-4577; (530) 541-2180 www.tahoelakeshorelodge.com The Lakeshore Lodge is easy to miss, as it is nestled between a Best Western hotel and Heidi’s restaurant, but that’s because it is located right on a lakefront beach. As a result, all rooms have a lake view, balcony, or patio; condos come with a fireplace and kitchen. The first-floor rooms give you easy access to the beach, but there are no partitions separating patios. If you want privacy, book higher. Best of all is the on-site, full-service spa called Elements, which offers massages, body wraps, reflexology, facials, and other body- and spirit-renewing treatments, based on the principles of Ayurveda. After my hour-long massage, accompanied by soothing, New Age music, I felt as if I had truly been touched by an angel. Elements is open to nonguests as well. Rooms start at $119 and condos start at $199 (prices vary depending on the season). Where to Eat in Lake Tahoe There is no shortage of restaurants in Lake Tahoe, ranging from the casual to the formal. Here are some you might want to try. Dory’s Oar Restaurant and the Tudor Pub 1041 Fremont Avenue South Lake Tahoe, Calif. 96150 (866) 541-6603; (530) 541-6603 www.celticcatering.com One of the most charming restaurants in South Lake Tahoe, Dory’s Oar is a local favorite, catering weddings, corporate events, and private receptions, as well as a frequent stop for visitors. Owners Keith and Jeannette Simpson have transported a piece of their native Surrey, England, to Lake Tahoe. The Simpsons should know a thing or two about events—after all, they’ve catered for the British royal family and government, and we all know how much fun that lot has! Having lived in London, I can vouch for the authenticity of the upstairs Tudor Pub, which comes complete with fireplace, beer mirrors, pints on draft, and a dartboard— the necessary trappings of any British pub worth its salt. It’s a great place to hang out with friends (the no-smoking law in California makes it even better), and with people of all ages, including kids and seniors. On the main floor, you are treated to elegant dining by Executive Chef Michael Jacobson. In addition to an extensive wine list, the menu offers such dishes as Maryland crab cakes with tomato, fresh basil, and roast garlic relish; fruit de mer, shrimp, salmon, and sea bass with lemon butter served in a puff pastry; and rack of lamb with a Dijon mustard crust, served with a roast onion demi-glace. Nepheles 1169 Ski Run Boulevard South Lake Tahoe, Calif. 96150 (530) 544-8130 www.nepheles.com Since 1977, Nepheles has been serving top-notch California cuisine with daily fish, vegetable, and game specials. Its chef has created interesting food and sauce com- binations, all of which are beautifully presented and served by an enthusiastic staff. This is a jewel of a restaurant in an area that is just beginning to blossom in its culi- nary offerings. We had seared ahi with Asian plum sauce, mashed garlic potatoes and carrots, a house salad with fabulously fresh lettuce and feather-light dressing, and salmon with a sweet cream sauce, mixed vegetables, and artichokes. Llewellyn’s Harvey’s Resort and Casino U.S. Route 50 Stateline, Nev. 89449 (800) 553-1022; (775) 588-2411 Supreme service and breathtaking views of the lake can be found in this formal restaurant atop Harvey’s Casino in Stateline. It’s pricier than most of the restaurants in the area, but worth it, especially if you are looking for a romantic setting and fine dining experience. Guests are serenaded by a piano player, giving the restaurant another touch of elegance. As evening approaches, any shades that are closed are ceremoniously lifted to reveal a full view of the lake at sunset. Sprouts Natural Foods Cafe 3123 Harrison Avenue South Lake Tahoe, Calif. 96150 (530) 541-6969 This was our favorite breakfast and lunch place in Lake Tahoe—we ended up eating here nearly every day, sometimes more than once. Locals, especially skiers, bikers, and other health-conscious types, go to Sprouts for their tuna burritos, hummus melts, nachos, smoothies, tempeh burgers, and sandwiches piled high with red cabbage, red onion, avocado, Monterey Jack, and, of course, sprouts, all made with low-fat dressings. Fresh-faced young staffers who are perky even in the face of bustling lunchtime crowds run this extremely worker-friendly restaurant. Mott Canyon Tavern & Grill 259 Kingsbury Grade Stateline, Nev. 89449 (775) 588-8989 Another locals hangout that does a brisk lunch and after-work business, Mott Canyon has excellent salads (try the Cobb and crispy chicken salad), yummy fries, and a Mott melt (turkey, bacon, cheddar, tomato, and avocado on sourdough) for those with hearty appetites. There’s a big fish tank inside, an enormous stone fireplace, and a bar that serves an array of beers on tap. We stopped off here on our way to the Tahoe Rim Trail and enjoyed a relaxing lunch on the porch. If you want to eat at an outdoor table, it’s a good idea to arrive a bit before the noon rush. 14 PERFORM PERFORM 15 by Kim Byrum Skinner Twenty years after becoming the first woman in space, former astronaut Sally Ride still packs a room. Her accomplishments remain standard book-report fare; her place in history is secure. So how, exactly, is civilian life any less crowded for an unassuming American icon? NASA 64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:37 PM Page 14
  9. 9. “I thought, if this is the main thing you get in return for being first, she can have it!” From that point on, Sullivan was perfectly content with her illustrious place in history as the world’s first female to walk in space. Celebrity jeopardy On the inherent celebrity that comes with being first, Ride’s 20/20 hindsight remains refreshingly honest. “Oh, I think every- body has to kind of just stumble his or her way through,” she says with a knowing laugh. “It was probably equal parts honor and burden, and maybe more of an honor than a burden, actual- ly. It’s a small price to pay for getting to do what I’ve had a chance to do.” quite striking when you look back on Earth from the van- tage point of space. That affects most astronauts, in different ways. I gained an appreciation that what we have is really very, very frag- ile, and that it’s more impor- tant than I had realized to try to protect it. “Just about every astronaut says this, so it’s become a bit of a cliché now, but when you look back at the planet, you do not see borders sepa- rating the countries. Those are things—fabrications— that we’ve created. That’s not what you see when you look down from space.” Sullivan‘s walk to remember Speaking from the Center of Science and Industry (COSI), the hands-on museum for kids based in Ohio, where she serves as president and CEO, Sullivan, 52, shares the experi- ence of walking in space— an accomplishment that leaves Ride playfully envious. “It’s hard to describe,” Sullivan says. “You know the suit cold. It’s a technical exercise with a time plan that you can do in your sleep. But you’re crazy if you don’t, now and then, let yourself mentally zoom back and take in where you really are as you’re doing it, because it’s extraordinary to get to be there. Not all of the four-hundred-plus peo- ple who’ve flown in space have gotten to do it, and it’s pretty amazing. “The real meaning unfolds and takes shape later. You’re aware of it and bursts of it pop through, but it is not ‘sit on the mountain transported by ecstasy.’ You have things to do.” Sullivan admits that at one time she wished she had been chosen to be the first woman in space. “I realized Sally was a superb choice. If it wasn’t going to be me, I’d have picked her. But, yes, there was a little bit of me that smarted about it.” She changed her mind when she saw just how much the media and the public invaded Ride’s life. In 1983, when Ride’s first flight was diverted to California to land due to weather, it was Sullivan’s job to meet the throng of disappointed VIPs waiting to see her in Florida. PERFORM 1716 PERFORM Mission: Possible FAMILY & LIVING W ell, people don’t always recognize me on the street now, and that’s a good thing,” jokes Ride, a pro- fessor of physics at the University of California, San Diego, who welcomes the elbow room. Early last spring, just days from the twentieth anniversary of her famous ride aboard Challenger flight STS-7, which made her America’s first woman in space, Ride, who is now 53, was very much recognized. She was inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame—fittingly, the first woman so honored. Shuttling across the country These days, Ride tours the country with the Sally Ride Science Festival. Her earthbound mission is to spark young girls’ interest in the traditionally male fields of math, science, and technology. “We’re trying to change the climate around girls in math, science, and technology. Girls who are thirteen years old don’t really think about engineers as female—yet. They tend to hear the word engineer and associate it with, you know, some fifty- year-old with a pocket protector.” Flanked by her former shuttle mate, Kathryn D. Sullivan— America’s first woman to walk in space—Ride awaits her audi- ence, which clamors for a front-row glimpse of the most celebrated American astronaut since Neil Armstrong. It’s as if nothing has changed. The ride of her life At the time of her history-making flight, Ride captured the imaginations of girls and young women nationwide, prompting Gloria Steinem to hail her six-and-a-half-day orbit as “an impor- tant first, because…millions and millions of little girls are going to sit in front of the television set and know they can become astronauts after this.” Selected from a field of seven thousand men and a thousand women, Ride’s flight-clinching advantage was her experience with NASA’s remote manipulator system, or RMS, a boom fifty feet long and the diameter of a telephone pole, used to fetch and retrieve satellites. During her flight, she deployed communica- tions satellites, operated the robot arm, and conducted experi- ments in materials, pharmaceuticals, and remote sensing of the Earth. “Looking back, I’m actually proud of the way I handled things,” Ride reveals. “It was really important to me to be seen as a competent professional. That’s really the principal image I wanted to put out there, because I thought it was a very important thing for all the women who were watching me, and all the girls growing up. I’m proud of that.” Ride’s most important space discovery was to view life through a wide-angle lens. “The main thing I was taken aback by and left with was the perception that we live on a planet—that we all live on a plan- et—and that this planet’s all we’ve got,” Ride says. “It really is We’re trying to change the climate around girls in math, science, and technology. Girls who are thirteen years old don’t really think about engineers as female—yet. ” “ NASA Mission: Possible FAMILY & LIVING “ NASA Ride at the controls Kathryn Sullivan NASA Kathryn Sullivan and Sally Ride 64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:40 PM Page 16
  10. 10. Mission: Possible FAMILY & LIVING Completed in 1984 during Challenger mission STS-41G (Ride’s second flight), Sullivan’s three-and-a-half-hour space- walk generated much less spectacle, in part because space flight was becoming, in the eyes of the public, much more routine. Nothing was farther from the truth. As evidenced by the loss of both Challenger (1986) and Columbia (2003), space travel remains high risk. “At the end of the day, it’s just human beings. Two-footed, carbon-based life forms, highly fallible,” Sullivan says. “You put some groups of human beings together in a room and it’s a miracle they can get the mail delivered on time. You put other groups together and they get to the moon and back.” “It’s a research and development program,” Ride agrees. “It’s not as routine as the news media might lead you to believe these days.” Sullivan’s successful extra-vehicular activity led to a spot on the crew of Discovery STS-31, which deployed the Hubble Space Telescope in 1990. She left NASA in 1992 to become chief scien- tist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and she now calls COSI home. “Sally and I have never sat down over a beer and compared notes, but I suspect she approached most things before her flight the same way that I did,” Sullivan says. “This was my first space walk, no matter how many people did it before me. “The only humans who’d done space walks were all guys, but I didn’t spot anything I thought was going to be magically differ- ent because of our anatomy. I’d never noticed that airplanes or ships worked differently because of the gender of the person at the helm.” Support structure Asked how she raised such a family of overachievers, Ride’s mother, Joyce, once responded, “In a way, you could look at it as neglect. Dale and I simply forgot to tell them there were things they couldn’t do. But if it had occurred to us to tell them, we probably would have refrained.” PERFORM 19 Mission: Possible FAMILY & LIVING 18 PERFORM I haven’t quite reached the point where I‘m looking back on my life and thinking about it all—yet. I think that‘s good,” Ride says, laughing. “I‘m certain it will happen some- day, but I really haven‘t tried to step back and think about, you know, my place in history, or the ultimate meaning of my flight. ” “ Sally Ride NASA NASA Ride and Sullivan rely on a hearty sense of humor to keep life’s demands in perspective. Presented with Oprah Winfrey’s signature closing question, “What do you know for sure?” Ride’s parting wit doesn’t disappoint. “Uh, E equals MC squared?” she quips. “Beyond that, not much.” Her mother’s remark catches Ride pleasantly off guard. “You know, that’s totally true,” she says excitedly. “That quote is accurate. Neither of my parents ever told either me or my sister (a Presbyterian minister) that we couldn’t do something. It’s totally amazing, especially since, in my case, neither of them were scientists or engineers. Neither of them were technical professionals. And here they were with this daughter who was inter- ested in science, and they proba- bly couldn’t quite figure out how that happened!” What does she consider her parents’ greatest gift? Without question, her self-esteem. “I didn’t have any role models growing up, other than my parents and a couple of teachers,” Ride adds. “I really didn’t have anyone out there in the real world I emulated—you know, scientists who were really role models for me. Certainly no astronauts. Lots of people I respected, but no one that I would have considered a role model.” Reflecting on achievement “I haven’t quite reached the point where I’m looking back on my life and thinking about it all—yet. I think that’s good,” Ride says, laughing. “I’m cer- tain it will happen someday, but I really haven’t tried to step back and think about, you know, my place in history, or the ultimate meaning of my flight.” Given their public achievements and high- powered lives, both Sally Ride today NASA NASA 64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:40 PM Page 18
  11. 11. 20 PERFORM More on Sally Ride‘s organizations TO JOIN THE SALLY RIDE CLUB: www.SallyRideClub.com Phone: (858) 638-1432 e-mail: info@SallyRideClub.com To join the Sally Ride Circle as a parent, educator, corporate, or civic leader, or to support Imaginary Lines as a partner or sponsor, address inquiries to: 9171 Town Centre Drive Suite 550 San Diego, Calif. 92122 Phone: (858) 638-1432 e-mail: info@SallyRideCircle.com MORE ON THE CENTER OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY: For information, or to support, shop at, or visit either COSI hands-on learning center, contact: COSI Columbus 833 West Broad Street Columbus, Ohio 43215 Phone: (888) 819-COSI; (614) 228-COSI www.CosiColumbus.org COSI Toledo 1 Discovery Way Toledo, Ohio 43604 Phone: (419) 244-COSI www.CosiToledo.org Kim Byrum Skinner is an Ohio-based freelance writer. NASA ARE YOU READY TO CHALLENGE THE JOINT PAIN OF ARTHRITIS? BEXTRA. Powerful 24-hour relief. One tablet. Once daily. Ask your doctor if a FREE sample of BEXTRA is right for you. One 10-mg BEXTRA Tablet, once a day, provides the kind of 24-hour relief many arthritis sufferers are looking for. Prescription BEXTRA is tough on joint pain and inflammation. And there’s one convenient dose that’s powerful enough to tackle both the pain of osteoarthritis and adult rheumatoid arthritis. For more information call 1-866-864-2600 or visit www.BEXTRA.com. Important Information. BEXTRA is not for everyone. Prescription BEXTRA should not be taken if you’ve had allergic reactions to certain drugs called sulfonamides, aspirin or other arthritis medicines or if you’ve had aspirin-sensitive asthma or are in late pregnancy. It is not recommended if you have advanced kidney disease. Tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver problems. In rare cases, serious stomach problems such as bleeding can occur without warning. Tell your doctor right away if you develop blisters in the mouth or a rash, as it can be a sign of a serious skin reaction that may be life threatening. If you experience other unusual symptoms while taking BEXTRA, tell your doctor immediately. The most common side effects are headache, abdominal pain, indigestion, upper respiratory infection, nausea and diarrhea. Please see important Product Information on page 54. 64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:46 PM Page 20
  12. 12. Choosing a Health Club FITNESS Choosing a Health Club FITNESS Pilates is an exercise program that works every muscle in the body in an aware, efficient manner. It is a series of exercises that are similar to yoga but involve more fluid, controlled, and concentrated movement. Pilates improves strength, flexibility, balance, control, and muscular symmetry. The rhythmic exercises promote elongated and toned muscles, and are noted for strengthening the abdomen, lower back, and buttocks, promoting a strong body core. Step aerobics provides a high-intensity, fat-burning workout and is lower impact than the jumping up and down found in other forms of aerobics. what they call “express workouts”. Others may stress personal training, group classes, or a wide variety of equipment. Some are social; others expect you to work out and go. There is no “best” club—the best club for you is the one you’ll want to attend regularly. A club membership will work for you only if you feel at ease there and want to show up. Here is some expert advice on how to pick a club that reflects your style and goals: • Make a list of what you want from a fitness club, including equipment, location, look and feel, variety of classes, personal trainers, cleanliness, and cost. • Which clubs are close to home or work? It won’t do you any good to join a club on the other side of town if you won’t go. Be sure the location and hours fit your needs. Studies have shown that if you live or work within a fifteen-minute drive, you’re more likely to go frequently. No matter where you live, your area most likely has fitness clubs, health classes, personal trainers, and activities that can move you toward your fitness goals. Whether you like to exercise alone or in a group, joining a health club can help you make exer- cise a habit, and you can make new friends—people who share your desire to get into shape. The PERFORM™ fitness pro has done the legwork to help you choose a health club, so all you have to do is get out and get on the move. Clubs vary widely in the equipment, classes, activi- ties, and services they offer, so choosing the right one might mean the difference between making fitness a habit and not going at all. Almost all have a variety of cardio (for the heart) equipment, such as tread- mills, elliptical trainers, and stair machines, and most offer popular group exercise classes such as spinning, yoga, step aerobics, and Pilates. But outside of these, each club has a different atmosphere, customer base, and services. Some clubs focus on people who exercise during the workday and offer Step AerobicsPilates REFLECTION IN THE MIRROR How to choose a health club that reflects your style and fitness goals by Joan Price There is no “best” club– the best club for you is the one you’ll want to attend regularly. 22 PERFORM PERFORM 23 Be sure to check with your doctor before starting an exercise program. 64342_A.r2 2/10/05 2:46 PM Page 22
  13. 13. PERFORM 25 T he sharp odor of pitch pine hangs in the air, along with distant echoes of an unseen woodchopper. The quiet stands of cypress and pine envelop you, and the settlement of Jamestown falls away as you delve deeper into the woods of the small Virginia island where a new world was born. Suddenly, the crunch of tires on a paved road breaks your reverie. The imaginary sights, sounds, and smells of Colonial America vanish into the twenty-first century, where you’re pedaling a twenty-three-mile scenic parkway spanning three American originals: Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown—representing the beginning, middle, and end of the Colonial period. Biking Virginia’s National Park Service–administered Colonial Parkway blurs the line between past and present and offers the chance to slip between the two as you pedal through history. Begin at Historic Jamestowne, the site of the first English settlement in the new world, and end at Yorktown Battlefield, site of the British surren- der that ended the Revolutionary War 175 years later. In between, witness nearly two centuries of early American history and a stretch of scenic parkway that skirts the expansive James and York rivers and passes right through Colonial Williamsburg. Historic Jamestowne Recent discoveries of the James Fort and the remains of a seventeenth- century colonist have brought new attention to this national park. Despite some damage from Hurricane Isabel in 2003, Jamestown Island remains a wooded sanctuary offering a cycling tour virtually undisturbed by traffic. Large oil paintings along the roads tell the story of the harsh colo- nial life the English settlers encountered. by Mary Burnham Biking a Time Line on Virginia’s Colonial Parkway Biking a Time Line on Virginia’s Colonial Parkway trainers, and stair machines, and most offer popular group exer- cise classes such as spinning, yoga, step aerobics, and Pilates. But outside of these, each club has a different atmosphere, customer base, and services. Some clubs focus on people who exercise during the workday and offer what they call “express workouts”. Others may stress personal training, group classes, or a wide vari- ety of equipment. Some are social; others expect you to work out and go. There is no “best” club—the best club for you is the one you’ll want to attend regularly. A club membership will work for you only if you feel at ease there and want to show up. Here is some expert advice on how to pick a club that No matter where you live, your area most likely has fitness clubs, health classes, personal trainers, and activities that can move you toward your fitness goals. Whether you like to exercise alone or in a group, joining a health club can help you make exercise a habit, and you can make new friends— people who share your desire to get into shape. The PERFORM™ fitness pro has done the legwork to help you choose a health club, so all you have to do is get out and get on the move. Clubs vary widely in the equipment, classes, activities, and services they offer, so choosing the right one might mean the difference between mak- ing fitness a habit and not going at all. Almost all have a variety of cardio (for the heart) equipment, such as treadmills, elliptical Spinning is an aerobic exercise that takes place on a specially designed stationary ”spinning” bicycle. As you pedal, motivating music plays and the instructor talks you through a visualization of an outdoor cycling workout. During the class you vary your pace— sometimes pedaling as fast as you can; other times cranking up the tension and pedaling slowly from a standing position. This helps you to focus inward and work on your mind as well as your body. Choosing a Health Club FITNESS Yoga seeks to promote health and well-being through physical exercise. It controls the activities of the mind, and its methods include ethical disciplines, physical postures, breath control, and meditation. Many common physical ailments can be improved through the regular practice of yoga, and it is never too late or too early in life to take it up. Anyone can do it. Yoga Spinning 24 PERFORM Once you join, go! Make a commitment to a regular workout schedule.
  14. 14. PERFORM 27 Patriot Lanes TRAVEL & LEISURE After a nine-day siege by American and French troops under General George Washington, the British surrendered Yorktown on October 18, 1781. It was the last major battle of the War for Independence. Preserved here are Surrender Field, the siege and defense lines of the Americans and their French allies, and the British, as well as the house where terms of surrender were ironed out. The Moore House is open weekends in the spring and fall and daily in summer. Yorktown offers two road tours: the battlefield tour, seven miles and marked with yellow arrows; and the red- arrowed encamp- ment tour, nine miles and less heav- ily traveled. Markers, earth- works, and displays tell the story of the siege. From the site of Washington’s headquarters on the encamp- ment tour, bikers can access the adjoining 8,000-acre Newport News Park, and another five- mile dirt bicycle trail through woods. The park has camping, hiking trails, a lake, and other recreational opportunities. The British surrender of Yorktown was the symbolic ending to the Colonial period, and it is a fitting place to end this historic bicycling tour. PERFORM 27 Mary Burnham is coauthor of Hiking America Virginia and Exploring the Small Towns of Virginia and Maryland. 26 PERFORM Patriot Lanes TRAVEL & LEISURE 26 PERFORM you’ll see the Magazine, a round brick building that signals the beginning of the historic area. Motor vehicles are not allowed inside, but bikes are. Take some time exploring this re-created three-hundred-acre town, including eighty-eight original build- ings. A ticket is required to enter most of the buildings, except for the Colonial Williamsburg taverns and retail shops. Colonial Williamsburg, or “Middle Plantation”, as it was called, grew from a defensive outpost established in the early days of Jamestown into a thriving settlement. In 1698, officials moved the Virginia colony’s capital from the then-swampy, bug-infested Jamestown Island to Williamsburg. Francis Nicholson, the royal governor, took on the task of laying out the new town around the College of William and Mary and the few homes and shop buildings. Thanks to such early planning, Williamsburg’s streets are arrow straight and wide. The main thoroughfares are paved, while some side streets are gravel and crushed oyster shells. When you’re ready to leave, find Robertson’s Windmill and follow a dirt path to the visitor center. Here begins the thirteen- mile journey to Yorktown. This is a less-traveled section of the parkway, with fewer scenic overlooks. Terrain is rolling and mostly wooded as it follows a log palisade, or protective fence, built by colonists across the entire width of the Virginia peninsula. About six and a half miles from Williamsburg, the parkway abruptly opens out onto the York River. From these shores you’ll see Cheatham Annex, an extension of Naval Station Norfolk, and farther down the road, the Naval Weapons Station. Today’s navy takes advantage of the York River’s deep channel, just as British General Cornwallis did when he made Yorktown his base in 1781. Historic markers are all that’s left of old plantations and Indian villages that once graced these shores. Yorktown Battlefield At the intersection of Ballard Street, begin looking for mounds of earth on either side of the road. British soldiers built these defensive breastworks during the Revolutionary War, and Confederate soldiers strengthened them eighty years later. From here, signs direct you to either the visitor center or the battlefield. The former is a good starting point for this historic park, and a stopping place for restrooms and water. PHOTOGRAPHSCOURTESYOFTHECOLONIALWILLIAMSBURGFOUNDATION,WILLIAMSBURG,VIRGINIA The imaginary sights, sounds, and smells of Colonial America vanish into the twenty-first century, where you’re pedaling a twenty-three-mile scenic parkway spanning three American originals: Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown—representingthe beginning, middle, and end of the Colonial period. Biking Conditions Elevation: The terrain is virtually flat along the James and York rivers, and slightly hilly between, with an elevation range from one to twenty-five meters above sea level. Traffic: The speed limit is forty-five miles per hour and no commercial traffic is allowed on the parkway. There are no intersections; roadways are elevated over the parkway. Bicycles are not allowed in the tunnel that passes beneath Colonial Williamsburg. In keeping with the natural scenery of the park- way, there are no lines or shoulders, so be careful to keep to the right and ride in single file. The ride: The pavement of aggregate stone cast in concrete makes for a slight- ly bumpy ride. Be careful of the joints between the large panels of concrete. Skinny tires can get caught in them. Distance markers are in kilometers and begin in Yorktown. Services There are no service stations, restrooms, or water sources along the parkway. Fill water bottles at the visitor centers in Jamestown or Yorktown, or in Williamsburg, halfway between. Each has restrooms. Camping: At the Jamestown end is Jamestown Beach Campsites, just off Route 31. Take Route 614 from the parkway for two miles. Open year-round. (757) 229-7609. Newport News Park, adjacent to the Yorktown Battlefield, also has camping. Open year-round. (757) 888-3333. Parking: Park at any of the three visitor centers, but at Yorktown and Jamestown you will have to pay the admission fee. Free parking is available at the Powhatan Creek parking area, just before the Jamestown Island entrance on the left. No overnight parking is allowed here or within either park. When to Go Crowds and traffic are thickest May through September. The average summer temperature in Virginia is around eighty degrees, but high humidity makes it seem hotter. Breezes off the James and York rivers provide some relief, though. The average winter temperature is 45 degrees, with light snow in January and February. Getting There Newport News/Williamsburg Airport is twenty minutes away; Richmond International Airport is forty-five minutes; and Norfolk International Airport is one hour. Amtrak has a train station in Williamsburg. By car, take Interstate 64 to exit 242A. Go six miles west on Route 199, four miles south on Route 31, then left on Route 359 south. Pass the Jamestown Settlement and proceed to the Colonial Parkway. Directly across the parkway is the Powhatan Creek parking area. The Jamestown Island entrance station is to the right. Admission and Hours Historic Jamestowne: $8 for adults (16 and under free); good for seven days. The entrance is open daily from 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. Once inside, visitors and bikers can stay until dark. A new visitor center is under construction, with completion planned for Jamestowne’s four hundredth anniversary in 2007. Meanwhile, a temporary modular visitor center is open from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Yorktown Battlefield: $5 for adults (16 and under free); good for seven days. The visitor center is open from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; the tour roads and battlefield are open from sunrise to dusk. Combination tickets: A $10 pass is good for seven days at both Yorktown and Jamestown. Colonial Williamsburg: There is no charge to walk or bike through the streets of Colonial Williamsburg. Passes can be purchased to enter the historic buildings. Open daily from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. More Information Colonial National Historical Park (757) 898-3400 www.nps.gov/colo Colonial Williamsburg (800) HISTORY www.colonialwilliamsburg.org Williamsburg Area Convention and Visitors Bureau (800) 368-6511 www.visitwilliamsburg.com Two circuit tours, one three miles and the other five, offer vistas of the James River through marsh and quiet woods that, thanks to preservation, have returned to a state resembling what the colonists first saw. Jamestown dates to 1607, when three tiny ships — the Susan Constant, the Godspeed, and the Discovery — brought the 144 settlers who established the first permanent English-speaking settlement in North America. Settlement ruins are fragile, so bicycles are not allowed within the Old Town site itself. Leave them at the bike rack in the parking lot and walk across the footbridge into seventeenth-century life. A short walking tour takes you by the foundations of these early structures, including the James Fort, rediscovered 370 years after it was built. Until recent years, archaeologists believed the fort had been eroded by the James River. Pedal off the island and follow the Colonial Parkway past swampland, stands of marsh grass, sandy riverside beaches, and an occasional dairy farm. Chances are good of seeing a great blue heron or snowy egret along the banks or shallow shoreline of the James River. Every mile or two brings a scenic overlook with markers describing the history of the area. The views of the expansive James — called Powhatan by the Indians — are breathtaking here, as it approaches the end of a 340-mile journey from the Appalachians to the Chesapeake Bay. As the parkway pulls away from the James, the terrain becomes more rolling and hilly. At eight miles, there’s a great picnic spot beneath towering white oak trees, described by a marker as dating back to 1750. Williamsburg At nine miles, the parkway tunnels one third of a mile beneath Colonial Williamsburg. Bicycles are not allowed in the tunnel and should exit at the off-ramp where directed. Don’t despair. The detour takes you right through the heart of Colonial Williamsburg. At the top of the exit ramp, turn left onto Newport Avenue and take the next left onto South England Street. After one block
  15. 15. PERFORM 2928 PERFORM the doctor is in The Modern Management of Arthritis Pain the doctor is in Q: What are the most common types of arthritis, and how do I know if I’m treating my joint pain correctly? A: Osteoarthritis (ahs-tee-oh-arth-RYE-tis), or OA, is the most common. Millions of people in the United States have it. In OA, the cartilage that covers the ends of bones in the joint wears down. In time, bone begins to rub against bone. This often leads to: • Pain • Loss of movement Rheumatoid arthritis (roo-mah-toid arth-RYE-tis), or RA, is one of the most serious and disabling types. It affects women more than men. In RA, the body’s own immune system attacks the joint. The joint lining gets inflamed, causing: • Soreness • Stiffness • Aching If you have pain, stiffness, or swelling in or around a joint for more than 2 weeks, see your doctor. Symp- toms can come on fast or slowly. Only a doctor can tell if it’s arthritis. Q: I like running, but joint pain in my hips and knees has reduced the enjoyment I get out of this exercise. What advice do you have? A: The right exercise can help you stay active. The key is to avoid excess stress on your joints. You may not be able to run if you have bad joint pain in your knees or ankles. If this is the case, try a new exercise for a change. Have you tried biking? Make sure the bike is the right size for your body. It should have a soft, padded seat. Make sure your seat and pedals are the right height. Try using lower gears on your bike to reduce the impact of pedaling. A good bike store can help you with this. Not a biker? Swimming is also a great way to keep flexible and it’s easy on the joints. Talk with your doctor about what is right for you. Q: I’ve heard conflicting opinions on whether exercise will help reduce my joint pain. What medical advice do you have about staying active? A: Exercise is vital in dealing with arthritis. Starting can seem like a huge task. Try to start slow and make it fun. Begin with stretching to improve your range of motion. This will help make daily tasks easier to do. Once this becomes easy, you can move on. Add weights, yoga, or biking. What if you’re in too much pain? You may want to try a water program. Being in water lessens stress on your hips, knees, and spine. Exercise also has many benefits that include: • Easing joint pain and stiffness • Building strong muscle around the joints • Increasing flexibility and stamina • Helping you sleep better • Controlling your weight • Reducing the risk of health problems, such as osteoporosis and heart disease It’s best to ask your doctor what is right for you. Are your days free from joint pain? For many adults, enjoying their day depends on their joint pain. There are good days and not-so-good days. PERFORM™ offers advice from our medical expert, Jeffrey Gudin, MD, to help get you back to living life as you want to. In this issue, Dr. Gudin answers common questions peo- ple have about joint pain. Dr. Gudin is clinical director of the Pain Management Center at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center. It is part of Mt. Sinai University School of Medicine in Englewood, New Jersey. Dr. Gudin is board certified in both pain management and anesthesiol- ogy (giving anesthesia for surgery). He has helped many arthritis sufferers lead healthier, more pain-free lives. Q: Simple motions like stirring food when I cook tend to make the joints in my hands and wrists feel weak and somewhat painful. Is this common, and is there any way I can reduce this joint pain? A: The stiffness, pain, and swelling of arthritis can really reduce the range of motion in all joints. This is the normal distance joints can move. However, not being active due to pain can in turn lead to muscle loss and weight gain. It’s best to try to stay active and close to a healthy weight. This will help relieve pressure that can damage your joints. Exercise should be part of your complete treatment plan. It can improve: • Joint mobility • Muscle strength • Overall physical health Medications will also help control joint pain. And with the right exercise, they can help relieve pain and fatigue and protect the joint. You and your doctor can come up with a program to reduce joint damage and promote overall health. Q: I’ve been taking the same generic pain reliever for my arthritis joint pain for years. Is there anything new for arthritis pain that may help me? A: Pain relief has come a long way. You don’t need to suf- fer from pain and swelling. Many options are on hand. There are over-the-counter drugs such as acetaminophen (ah-see-tuh-MIN-uh-fen) and ibuprofen (EYE-byu-pro- fen) and prescription drugs such as COX-2–specific inhibitors (Celebrex and BEXTRA are examples). In some cases, surgery is needed. Diet and exercise are also impor- tant. Your doctor may discuss some of these options with you. Which joints does arthritis affect? Arthritis affects the knees, hips, ankles, elbows, hands, and spine (both neck and back). It can be caused by: • Redness and swelling within the joint • Damage from trauma or pressure against the joint It can often lead to other things, such as: • Fatigue that can make the pain harder to bear, making it seem much worse • Depression from not being active, or from no longer being able to do activities you enjoy How do I know if I have arthritis? You might suspect you have arthritis if you have symptoms that include the following: • Persistent joint pain • Pain or tenderness in a joint that is aggravated by any movement or activity, such as walking, getting up from a chair, writing, typing, holding an object, throwing a ball, or turning a key • Joint swelling, stiffness, redness, and/or warmth • Loss of flexibility or range of motion in a joint • Joint deformity • Crepitus (the cracking noise arthritic joints make upon movement) Your doctor can diagnose arthritis by looking at your medical history, doing a physical exam, ordering tests, and having x-rays taken. Information in this article should not replace talking with your doctor about your health. 64342_B.r3 2/10/05 2:54 PM Page 28
  16. 16. PERFORM 31 best remembered for his mesmerizing performance as Sonny Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola’s legendary Godfather series. But ask him what he’s proudest of, and his answer may surprise you: “I think my proudest achievement is that I’ve never missed a day’s work in my life,” he says. Raising the bar It’s hard for most of us to imagine attaining such an impressive career—let alone not missing a single day of filming on countless sets and locations. But for Caan, who learned the value of team- work and commitment from playing organized sports in his youth, it’s no big deal: “You sign on and you finish,” says Caan with his matter-of-fact delivery. And as for the people he’s worked with, “You don’t have to work with them again, but you have to finish the season. You can’t quit.” Throughout his career, Caan has displayed an unstoppable work ethic and an unwavering dedication to whatever project he’s involved with. Born in the Bronx and raised in Queens, New York, Caan says his work ethic was inspired by his father, who operated a successful meat business. What was his main inspira- tion for going into acting? “I didn’t want to lug hindquarters of beef all day,” says Caan in his typical tell-it-like-it-is fashion. Caan’s free-spirit attitude toward life was evident early on. He spent a year at Michigan State University, where he played foot- ball with the Spartans, and then transferred to Hofstra University on Long Island, New York, initially to study law. He eventually changed his major to drama after a successful audition at Sanford Meisner’s Neighborhood Playhouse during a spring break. “When I got back, [acting] was sort of like a last resort. I went to school and hammered out my interests, and acting has continued to hold my interest actually until now.” One of Hollywood’s most versatile actors In addition to playing football, Caan has a black belt in karate, and spent nine years as a professional rodeo cowboy. So it’s natu- ral that Hollywood looked to him to fill the roles of “tough guy”— especially after the landmark Godfather movies: “After I did Sonny [Corleone], every script I got there had to be twelve people dead by page twenty or I wouldn’t get it,” he says with a laugh. “But then I did Funny Lady and For the Boys, and they go, ‘We never knew you could sing and dance.’ Well, nobody ever asked me!” Caan enjoys playing the tough-guy roles that suit him so well. But he also knows that to stay in demand, you have to be able to perform well in as many things as possible. “If you’re going to be James Caan COVER STORY a saxophone player, you have to learn how to play a lot of dif- ferent songs to be considered a good player. You can’t just play “Yankee Doodle Dandy” all the time. You know what I mean?” “Time out” for fatherhood After years of having phenomenal success and enjoying the Hollywood actor lifestyle, Caan lost his sister and best friend, Barbara, to leukemia in 1981. This tragedy made Caan reflect on his life, leading to a decision that would add to his legend. He decided to leave Hollywood in order to spend time raising his family. “I decided that, unless I had passion for something [act- ing], I wasn’t going to do it. So I basically quit.” As a father, Caan excels. He revels in the fact that he’s been able to have a positive impact on the development of his children, including daughter Tara, 39, and sons Scott, 27 (also a successful actor), Alex, 12, Jimmy, 8, and Jake, 5. He perks up when he dis- cusses his role in coaching his sons’ sports teams. “You see the changes happening from day to day and your influence. I think that’s why I enjoy coaching so much, too. Take a kid who didn’t think he could do something and in five minutes’ time have him doing it, and all of a sudden he goes from a shy little kind of a scaredy-cat to a little banty rooster. Creatively, it’s quite reward- ing, you know?” Caan also enjoys seeing the results in real time: “You don’t have to wait six months for them to put music to it and edit it—things happen right in front of your eyes.” When asked who he turns to whenever things get tough, Caan immediately points to his chil- dren: “I look to them...they’re the ones who lift me up.” Clearly, playing father is a role Caan is very keen on. When asked what keeps him going, Caan answers with trademark honesty and humor: “What keeps me going? Four wives and five children!” Some “choice” bits • Turned down lead roles in Mash, The French Connection, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and Apocalypse Now • Favorite on-screen role:The professional safecracker, Frank, in Thief • Favorite off-screen role: Dad “I decided that, unless I had passion for something, I wasn’t going to do it. ” “Take a kid who didn’t think he could do something and in five minutes’ time have him doing it. Creatively, it’s quite rewarding. ” 30 PERFORM James Caan COVER STORY A fter a brief absence from the limelight, Oscar-, Golden Globe-, and Emmy Award nominee James Caan is now back as the star of the new hit NBC TV series “Las Vegas” and hit film Elf. The dedicated actor took a few moments between takes on the set to tell PERFORM™ what drives him to succeed, how he stays in the game, and how he places his role as a father above all else. James Caan, known as “Jimmy” to friends and fans alike, has appeared in more than seventy feature films. These include cul- tural and critical landmarks such as A Bridge Too Far, For the Boys, Funny Lady, Honeymoon in Vegas, Misery, Rollerball, The Gambler, The Way of the Gun, and Thief. Of course, he’s CaanCaanby Jeff Mucciolo ThePros of Being Film legend James “Jimmy” Caan went from humble beginnings in Brooklyn to the heights of Hollywood success. After taking time off to be with his family, this real-world “tough guy” has returned to reclaim his title and is showing no signs of slowing down. “I think my proudest achievement is that I’ve never missed a day’s work in my life. ” 64342_B.r3 2/10/05 2:55 PM Page 30
  17. 17. PERFORM 33 James Caan COVER STORY “Medicine is moving right along.” He should know—he sits on the board of the Joan English Fund for Women’s Cancer Research, and he and his wife, Linda, strongly support its various fund-raising activities. When asked what advice he would offer people about enjoying life, it’s this: “You’ve got to stay in shape, and that’s the key thing. I mean, even now, with all my shoulder surgeries and what- not, I’m still able to do what I want—it just takes a little effort. Don’t look at your birth certificate and give up. I know some guys near eighty who still go to the gym, and they can outrun me and you. It’s just a state of mind. There are so many things now that can keep us young and fit. There’s a lot available to people out there who want to continue to do whatever it is that they like to do for a long time.” Just being Caan Throughout it all, Caan doesn’t see himself as anything special— just an experienced actor who has had success, thanks to hard work and dedication. “Something I’m proudest of is that I’m still doing it, enjoying it, and still in demand. So that’s probably the crowning achievement, as far as I’m concerned. And getting respect from the young guys that I watch and [who I] respect myself.” “Even now, with all my shoulder surgeries and whatnot, I’m still able to do what I want—it just takes a little effort. Don’t look at your birth certificate and give up. ” As further proof that this screen legend practices what he preaches, Caan has managed to squeeze in an appearance in the upcoming film Dogville, in which he plays Nicole Kidman’s father. Although he’s thrilled to still be doing the parts he wants— and only the ones he wants—Caan does occasionally miss being the up-and-coming Lothario: “I’m getting a little tired of these young, pretty girls coming up to me and telling me how much their mother loves me,” he jokes. Hey, Jimmy, take heart: at least they didn’t say it was their grandmother…yet! The Joan English Fund for Women’s Cancer Research The Joan English Fund supports scientific research to help with early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of women’s cancers, including ovarian, breast, uterine, endometrial, cervical, and others. Joan English’s family created the fund after she lost her battle with late-stage ovarian cancer in August 2000, at the age of sixty-nine. James Caan sits on the fund’s board of directors and takes part in fund-raising events with his wife, Linda. The fund is being used to support the purchase of state-of-the-art research equipment, which will be used to search for gene markers and tumor suppressor genes. Using this equipment, researchers hope to see rapid break- throughs in detection and treatment. Most of all, they hope their findings will help more women win the fight against cancer. The fund also supports the work of Dr. Ferid Murad, M.D., Ph.D., a Nobel Prize winner and professor and chairman of the Department of Integrative Biology, Pharmacology, and Physiology at the University of Texas Medical School. To learn more about the fund, visit http://curewomenscancer.org. 32 PERFORM James Caan COVER STORY Caan hits the jackpot in “Las Vegas” In his first starring role in a television series, Caan plays Big Ed Deline, the head of an elite surveillance team that is charged with maintaining security for the fictional Montecito Resort & Casino in Las Vegas. What are the odds that Caan can ride his latest role to the top? Let’s just say, NBC quickly renewed this funny, sexy series for next fall after it was ranked the #1 new adult drama this season. With his history of tough roles buoying him, Caan has an imposing presence, and is a natural as the chief of security who’s not afraid to mix it up when one of the casino-goers gets out of hand. “Las Vegas” lets him show off his razor-sharp sense of humor, as well as his guiding force as a father: At the Montecito, he serves as father figure to the members of his young and (of course) beautiful security team, including actors Nikki Cox, Vanessa Marcil, Molly Sims, Josh Duhamel, and others. As with anything James Caan does, he is fiercely committed to the future success of the show. “It takes time. Next year hopefully will be a lot better than this year, and I hope it keeps growing to the point where we’re all pretty happy.” On keeping in shape From football, to a black belt in karate, to nine years on the rodeo circuit, Caan has clearly led a physically demanding lifestyle. How does he do it? “I’ve had eleven shoulder surgeries!” he exclaims with a hearty laugh. “When you’re young you think you’re indestructible, you know? I’m going to be sixty-four, which is really hard to say because I still feel thirty-two.” Despite his occasional aches and pains, Caan confides that he has no plans for slowing down. He remains a firm believer in the power of modern medicine as an aid to his longevity. Caan is partic- ularly enthusiastic about the future of medicine. Breaking through barriers After years of being out of the mainstream, Caan realized that to support his growing family he would have to make a return to acting. “I woke up one morning and I didn’t have any money. Absence does not make the heart grow fonder, that’s all I can say.” But after being one of Hollywood’s golden boys for so many years, Caan soon learned that Hollywood is quick to forget even its most celebrated stars: “People kind of forgot me, so it wasn’t as if I thought that I could just come right back.” With his mind set on getting back into acting, Caan relied on what had gotten him to the top the first time around—hard work, followed by more hard work. After a string of progressively larger roles in the 1990s, he’s reclaimed his golden-boy status. In 2003, he starred as Will Ferrell’s workaholic father in the Christmas blockbuster film, Elf. And now he’s “the man” on “Las Vegas.” James Caan By the Numbers 75 feature films 9 years on the professional rodeo circuit 6 years coaching Little League, football, and soccer 4 Golden Globe nominations 1 top-rated new adult drama —“Las Vegas” 1 Academy Award nomination 1 Emmy nomination 1 black belt in karate 0 days of work missed 0 regrets Actors James and Scott Caan (son) James Caan and cast on the set of his hit TV series “Las Vegas” 64342_B.r3 2/10/05 3:02 PM Page 32
  18. 18. “The race is not always to the swift...but to those who keep on running.” “Act as if it were impossible to fail.” ““WWe come to feel as we behae come to feel as we behaveve..”” “I bend but do not break.” “Forever is composed of nows.” –Author Unknown –Dorothy Broude ––PPaul Paul Pearsallearsall –Jean de La Fontaine –Emily Dickinson “We come to feel as we behave.” –Paul Pearsall Proud to support individuals living life in the moment. BEXTRA.com PERFORM 35 Grape Expectations TRAVEL & LEISURE W e stand in the crisp fall air and watch as a half dozen workers quick- ly load trays of grapes onto a forklift, feeding them into the destem- ming and crushing machine. It’s the last of Ingleside Plantation Vineyard’s fall harvest, or as they call it around here, “the crush”. By mid-October, the crush is ending for vineyards like this one on Virginia’s Northern Neck. Colder mountain regions may have several more weeks to go. Harvest is a tough business—watching the weather report, making sure to have enough workers at the right time, and crushing the grapes before they go bad. Doug Flemer, whose family has owned this farm since 1890, recalls rushing to pick grapes before a hurricane hit, as well as the harvest of 1996, when it rained every weekend. “A lot of vines just didn’t get picked that year,” he says. Virginia’s hard-to-predict weather makes each year’s wine a bit different, simi- lar to the wines of France. In both regions, people look forward to barrel tast- ings. In California, where the weather is more stable, wines taste nearly the same, year after year. The grapes being crushed today were handpicked under sunny skies and put into trays known as lugs. The lugs were stacked in a refrigerated truck overnight, to kill bacteria and make the grapes pop open in the crusher. “All the juice from these grapes is white,” says our guide, Bruce Perrygo. If this juice were going to be used to produce a white wine, the grapes would go into a press that keeps the skins separate from the juice. Since this is going to be a red wine, the skins are put in with the juice and are fermented with yeast, which turns the sugar into alcohol. The noise of the crushing machine, the strong smell of ripe fruit, and the hun- dreds of fruit flies buzzing around don’t quite fit the romantic image of wine- making that we had in mind. But this is just the beginning. The art and science of winemaking start after the crush. It can be a long process—often years—of fil- tering, testing, tasting, and aging. There are many decisions to be made, and all of these choices will affect the taste of the wine. It isn’t just for breakfast anymore Winemaker Bill Swain takes a sip of the juice in his laboratory-like workshop, located in the barn of his century-old farm. He measures the sugar content of the grapes with a special meter while they are still on the vine. He also uses his own taste test: When the grape seeds taste like Grape-Nuts® cereal—rich, sweet, and grainy—they are ready to be picked. The winemaker’s art is the ability to predict what this raw grape juice will taste like after years in a bottle. GrGrape Expectctations GrGrape Expectctations Grape ExpectationsVirginiaWines Come of Age by Mary Burnham 64342_B.r3 2/10/05 2:57 PM Page 34
  19. 19. PERFORM 37 Grape Expectations TRAVEL & LEISURE 36 PERFORM Grape Expectations TRAVEL & LEISURE The father of American wine Virginia has more than eighty farm wineries like Ingleside— twice as many as ten years ago—from the Chesapeake Bay to the Cumberland Gap. Ingleside is one of the older Virginia wineries, producing its first commercial wines in 1980. It already has a great reputation in Virginia’s young wine industry, where age is measured in decades instead of centuries. In international tasting competitions, Virginia labels are rank- ing up there with the big boys from France. Even California Wine Guru Robert Mondavi said that Virginia would soon become a world player in the wine business. Although President Thomas Jefferson is credited as being the father of American wine, and he chose the first vintages to be stocked at the White House, no one really knows if he lived long enough to try any of his native state’s fine products. Jefferson began experimenting with American grapes, but he stopped when the Revolutionary War broke out. Short-term suc- cess was achieved in the mid-1800s with a mix of American and European grapes. Some of these grapes—Norton, Catawba, Niagara, and Concord—are still grown today. Sadly, most of the vineyards were destroyed in the Civil War. Then, in the early 1900s, Prohibition brought the whole process to an end. Wines were not produced again in Virginia until the 1960s. In the 1970s, Chardonnay, Reisling, and Cabernet Sauvignon began to be bottled in the area. Virginia now ranks eleventh in wine pro- duction among the fifty states. Growing places Only time will tell how Virginia’s young wines will fare against the best wines of the world, but it didn’t take long for several new wineries to make their mark. Virginia’s biggest success story may be the Williamsburg Winery, the largest in the state. We were amazed to learn that it produces one quarter of the wines made in Virginia— about sixty thousand to seventy thousand cases a year. That’s a lot of wine—especially since the owner created his first wine, Governor’s White, only fifteen years ago. It is now the most popular of all Virginia wines. The Williamsburg Winery has been invited to several international tastings, where its wines were poured alongside some from European vineyards that date back to the Renaissance. The Kluge Estate Winery and Vineyard Farm Shop, run by Patricia Kluge, is not as large as the Williamsburg Winery. Kluge, owner of a huge estate near Charlottesville, is already a wealthy woman, but her dream is to become one of America’s premiere winemakers. When her winery opened in spring 2003, the public had one of its first samplings of her Bordeaux-style 2001 New World Red and a sweet aperitif called Cru. Just three years old, the winery introduced its first vintage in fall 2002 with 289 bottles of a limited edition 2000 New World Red, each bottle signed by Kluge (whose profile is on all her labels), and boxed in a case made of American walnut, designed by Lord David Linley. Kluge has spared no expense in achieving her vision, putting together the world’s top winemaking people. The wine is, as you’d expect, expensive. Still, we found the Farm Shop to have the friendly feel of a country store, with a shop for potted herbs and Virginia preserves, and a restau- rant where you can eat lunch while you sample the wines. During Virginia’s Historic Garden Week, Kluge opens her gar- dens, the chapel she designed herself, and her conservatory of exotic plants to the public. A few miles away from Ingleside, a brand new winery, Oak Crest, opened its tasting room to the public in 2003. The stone fireplace and outdoor deck tables make a cozy setting for tastings. Conrad and Dorothy Brandts and their two sons all juggled full-time jobs while building their vineyard, stopping whenever they ran out of money. Making wine seems to be in Conrad’s blood. When he was still in high school, his German grandfather taught him how to produce wine for their family. In 1985 he purchased fourteen acres on Virginia’s Northern Neck. In 1986 he started planting vines and, a decade later, started building the winery. The Brandts make small batches of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, and Merlot, but their specialty is wine made from the white Symphony grape, which is similar to those used in German Rhine wines. The couple doesn’t plan on getting rich making wine. It is something they love to do in retirement, and that they can pass on to their children. Their small, family- operated winery is a prime example that for some, winemaking is more of a passion than a business. Wine Pronunciation Key Ordering wine can be difficult—many of us have trouble wrapping our tongues around some of those strange- looking names. The following crib sheet will help you at the wine store or restaurant: Aperitif (a-par-uh-TEEF) Beaujolais (bow-jho-lay) Cabernet Sauvignon (kab-er-nay saw-vee-nyon) Chablis (sha-blee) Chardonnay (shar-dun-nay) Fumé Blanc (foo-may blahn) Merlot (mer-low) Pinot Grigio (pee-no GREE-jee-oh) Pinot Noir (pee-no nwar) Pouilly Fumé (poo-yee foo-may) Reisling (REES-ling) Rosé (ro-zay) Sancerre (san-sair) Sauvignon Blanc (saw-vee-nyon blahn) Vouvray (voo-vray) Wine 101 Though there is an entire universe of wines to explore, the three basic categories below will give you a good head start. TABLE WINES. The most commonly pur- chased wines, these are reds and whites that are served with a meal. Whites are chilled; reds are served at room temperature. Reds are aged and whites, for the most part, are not. SPARKLING WINES. These are the “bubbly” wines, like champagne, that are usually served on special occasions. Sparkling wines are made around the world, the same way as champagne, but with different grapes. FORTIFIED WINES. These heavier wines, such as port and sherry, are made by adding wine alcohol or brandy. They are usually served with desserts or as an after-dinner drink. Post Grape-Nuts is a trademark of KF Holdings. Mary Burnham is coauthor of Hiking America Virginia and Exploring the Small Towns of Virginia and Maryland. Year-round Virginia Wine Events More than 350 Virginia wine events, from individual barrel tastings to giant festivals, take place throughout the year. There are polo matches, grape stompings, bluegrass concerts, garlic and mushroom festivals, and even winemak- ing seminars. All events are listed in the annual Virginia Wineries Festival and Tour Guide, which also lists all eighty of Virginia’s wineries, with maps and directions. For a free copy of the guide, please contact the Virginia Wine Marketing Office at (800) VAVINES (828-4637) or visit www.virginiawines.org. 64342_B.r3 2/10/05 2:57 PM Page 36
  20. 20. bright thinking 38 PERFORM TIPS & TRENDS PERFORM 39 TIPS & TRENDS “Optimists coped by taking a negative situation and turning it into something as positive as possible,” says Carver, who followed these women for one year. “They said, ‘My life isn’t over; it’s just going to be different.’ The pessimistic women were more likely to deny the disease and essentially give up.” Learn optimism The good news for doom-and-gloomers is that they can train themselves to have a more positive outlook. In his book, Learned Optimism (Pocket Books), Seligman says you should start by mind- ing your ABCs — that is, keep a record of your Adversity, Beliefs, and Consequences. Adversity, according to Seligman, can be almost anything — a leaky faucet, a baby who doesn’t stop crying, or being ignored by a spouse. Seligman says the next time a negative event occurs in your life, write down your thoughts about what has happened without going into your feelings. Your beliefs are how you interpret the adversity or bad event. For example, “I just blew my diet” and “I am incompetent” are beliefs. “I feel sad” is a feeling. Next, write down your feelings and what you did afterward. Did you feel sad, anxious, guilty? Write down as many feelings and actions as you can. “I ate a carton of ice cream” is a consequence. By completing this exercise, Seligman says, you’ll find that your negative beliefs are probably exaggerated. Once you recognize this, challenge those beliefs whenever they occur. “Don’t let your nega- tive beliefs run your emotional life,” Seligman cautions. “Once you get into the habit of questioning your negative beliefs, your daily life will be much better and you will feel much happier.” Hold that thought In order to change the way pessimists think, Emmett Miller, M.D., author of Deep Healing (Hay House), uses a technique called “selective awareness”, in which people try to train themselves to think positively. “I tell my patients to focus on a success in their life,” says Miller. “It can be the birth of a child, or a vacation when you’ve had one of those perfect moments. You have the power to direct your mind to think about whatever you want. Focusing on a place where you felt good about yourself will give you more optimism.” Optimists have better lifestyle habits, and recover from illnesses faster than pessimists do. brightbrightOptimists are healthier as well as happier by Samantha Jacqueline it has started to rain quite hard, and you have forgotten to bring your umbrella. You think: (a) It always rains when I don’t have my umbrella with me. (b) I’m going to get soaking wet and be miserable all day. (c) This rain is going to be great for the lawn and garden. If you chose (c), you are probably an optimist, and psychologists say that optimists are not only healthier than those who have a neg- ative outlook, they might live longer as well. Evidence also suggests that optimists catch fewer infectious diseases, have better lifestyle habits, and may recover from illness faster than pessimists do. There are a number of ways to measure optimism and pessimism, and the old saying about seeing the cup half full or half empty is only part of it. According to one expert, it all comes down to the way we explain the events in our lives. Martin Seligman, Ph.D., professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, says pessimists believe their lives are an endless string of pitfalls for which they have only themselves to blame. Optimists, on the other hand, do not blame themselves for their misfortune, which they believe is only temporary. In fact, unlike pessimists, who tend to give up easily, optimists are inspired to try even harder. Cope with stress Although a sunny disposition will not protect you against illness, research has shown that optimists have fewer physical problems. In a study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, ninety law students at the University of Kentucky in Lexington were followed from the beginning through the middle of their first semester. The students, who were all healthy at the time, were asked to fill out questionnaires to find out what their expecta- tions were for their lives in general, as well as their expectations for success in law school. The study revealed that the most optimistic students had the strongest immune systems, which protect against illness. “Optimists cope better with stress, experience fewer negative moods, and have a healthier lifestyle, all of which could help strengthen the immune system,” says Suzanne Segerstrom, Ph.D., lead author of the study. Let happy thoughts heal In study after study, researchers have found that looking on the bright side contributes significantly to a person’s recovery. For example, when coronary bypass patients were tested for their level of optimism before and after surgery, those who were the most optimistic returned to their normal activities at a faster rate than pessimists did. “The optimists got out of bed sooner, reported a higher quality of life, and were less likely to suffer a heart attack during the surgery,” says Michael Scheier, Ph.D., of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, who tracked the patients’ responses to surgery for six months. Likewise, accepting one’s fate, rather than denying the problem, is another key factor in the recovery process, according to Charles Carver, Ph.D., professor of psychology at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida. Carver tested the emotional well-being of fifty women who were diagnosed with breast cancer. Join the optimists Hard-core naysayers might want to consider therapy, but psychologists say it is extremely helpful to have a positive-thinking friend or partner with whom you can talk honestly and get feedback and support. It is also important to avoid negative thinkers. “Seek out the people that you want to be like,” advises Psychologist Christopher Peterson, Ph.D., of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. “It’s rough to be the only optimist in a fam- ily or group of pessimists.” Avoid pessimism To a true pessimist, becoming a Pollyanna may sound as unlikely as changing into a butterfly, but there is still hope. A recent study of 224 people middle-aged and older found that avoiding pessimism may be important for lowering stress and improving one’s health. “Previously, optimists and pessimists were considered direct opposites,” says Research Psychologist Susan Robinson-Whelan, Ph.D., lead author of the study, conducted at State University of Ohio in Columbus. “We did not find this to be the case. It might be easier for people who tend to be pessimistic to say, ‘I don’t have to learn to be an optimist in order to be physically healthy, but I should tone down my negative thinking.’” Psychologists say that optimists catch fewer infectious diseases and may live longer than those who have a negative outlook. thinkingthinking 64342_B.r3 2/10/05 3:04 PM Page 38

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