Orientation To Leading In Organizations

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The Leadership Initiative\'s developmental process.

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Orientation To Leading In Organizations

  1. 1. Leading in Organizations A Partnership of The School of Business and Corporations.
  2. 2. <ul><li>The Portfolio Perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Development through Awareness and Peer Coaching </li></ul><ul><li>Leader “Workshops” – Participant Created Cases and Analyses </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental Workshops – Assessment and Development Planning, Job Challenge Profile, Myers Briggs, Learning Tactics Inventory </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment, Planned Development & Behavior Change </li></ul><ul><li>Immersion of participants in a supportive environment </li></ul>Elements
  3. 3. “Portfolios” <ul><li>A collection of activities, projects, plans representative of an individual’s expressive work and accomplishments </li></ul><ul><li>An approach to the management of investments </li></ul>
  4. 4. Implementation Why should anyone want to be led by me ? Leadership Context Statement Assessments PRE - WORK DISCUSSIONS Assessment Results FOLLOW UP (THREE MONTHS) LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PORTFOLIO FEEDBACK LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT CONSULTATION Consultants Feedback Why should anyone want to be led by me ? Context Statement Assessment Results Consultants’ Feedback Your Analysis of Feedback Your Strategic Plan for Leadership Development LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PORTFOLIO PLAN
  5. 5. Assessment of Current State of Development is Key Lominger Leadership Architect Center for Creative Leadership Benchmarks: 360
  6. 6. Portfolio: Evaluation <ul><li>Engagement – Personal/Professional </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding the meaning and application of assessments </li></ul><ul><li>Use of consultants’ analyses and recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>Strategies for future investment </li></ul>
  7. 7. Consultation (Coaching) <ul><li>Coaching materials distributed to triads </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Results of assessments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leadership context statement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Coaches </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyze assessment results in relation to leadership context </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prepare written summaries </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In class discussion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>90 minutes (30 minutes each) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Discuss coaches findings and recommendations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Participants </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Incorporate Coaches’ findings and recommendations into their portfolios </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Write responses </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Leadership Workshops Emphasis on cases that reflect participants’ actual leadership challenges
  9. 9. Workshop Evaluation <ul><li>Case Presenters prepare peer evaluations of the cases </li></ul><ul><li>Case Writers prepare peer evaluations of case presentations </li></ul><ul><li>Case Development Criteria </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interesting leadership issue </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reflect multiple factors, perspectives, consequences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide specific evidence </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Case Analysis Criteria </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Considers multiple perspectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Links among people, context, and consequences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recommendation based on analysis & relevant theory </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. 16 Sessions SESSIONS SELF TRIAD ORGANIZATION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 LDC LW LW LW LW LW AWARENESS COLLABORATION GROUP LDC LW LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT CONSULTATION LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP BEHAVIOR CHANGE
  11. 12. Executive Education is Irrelevant ...unless it is used
  12. 13. Fundamental Assumption <ul><li>Businesses invest in executive education to improve business results </li></ul>
  13. 14. Relevance defined <ul><li>The Learner </li></ul><ul><ul><li>WIIFM: what’s in it for me </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Learner’s Manager </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I see value in encouraging application </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Business Leader who pays the bill </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improved results </li></ul></ul>
  14. 15. The difference is follow-through Less effective No Change More Effective Less effective No Change More Effective Less effective No Change More Effective Goldsmith, M: “Ask, Learn, Follow-up, and Grow,” in Hesselbein et al: Leaders of the Future, 1996 ” Consistent or periodic follow-up had a dramatic, positive impact.” percent percent percent
  15. 16. Conclusions - 8 company study <ul><li>Real leadership development is a process. </li></ul><ul><li>Almost any follow-up is better than none. </li></ul><ul><li>One of the greatest weaknesses in most training and development is the insufficient attention paid to follow-up. </li></ul><ul><li>The biggest challenge for most leaders is not understanding the practice of leadership; it is practicing their understanding of leadership. </li></ul>Goldsmith and Morgan, Best Practices in Organizational Development, 2003
  16. 17. The Knowing-Doing Gap <ul><li>“ Regardless of the quality of content, the delivery,or the frequency of repetition, management education is often ineffective in changing organizational practices.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ We came to call this the knowing-doing problem - the challenge of turning knowledge ... into actions consistent with that knowledge.” </li></ul><ul><li>Pfeffer and Sutton: The Knowing Doing Gap. </li></ul><ul><li>Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2000 </li></ul>
  17. 18. Reasons Why Training and Development Fails Phillips, JJ and Phillips, PP: Training , September 2002
  18. 19. Education as Leverage
  19. 20. Follow-through process
  20. 21. Questions and Comments
  21. 22. The tool
  22. 23. Results Only 40% of Managers of the control group reported that they were aware of the goals their direct reports set as a result of the training. In contrast, all of the managers of the follow-through group were aware of their reports’ goals Awareness of Goals
  23. 24. Results 35% of students in the control group reported that they never discussed the course even once with their managers. In contrast, only 3% of the follow-through group failed to discuss the course. The number of discussions also were increased in the follow-through group. Discussions
  24. 25. Results Managers were asked to indicate the extent to which the course had improved their reports’ management skills. 12% of the follow-through group, but none of the control group were rated ‘markedly improved’ - the highest rating. Change in Effectiveness
  25. 26. ROI Measurement: Example <ul><li>Management skills program </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluated after participants had had three month’s experience </li></ul><ul><li>92% successfully used what they had learned </li></ul><ul><li>Over 400 detailed examples submitted </li></ul><ul><li>Median value of single incidents was just under $5,000 </li></ul><ul><li>ROI (annual) was 15 times cost of training </li></ul>

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