Designing Games, Motivating Students, and Entrepreneurship

350 views

Published on

Serious Game Design Summer School results presented at the Great Conference in Lisbon, Portugal - September 2013

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
350
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Educational games have always been low budget, low tech, poor cousins of the computer game industry. Up until recently, very few commercial companies provide good quality educational games. Historically, these games have been written by teachers and academics who wish to utilize the technology within there teaching, but usually do not have the skill, not the finance, to create a high quality product. Commercial recreational games cost millions of dollars to create and often have teams of a hundred on more people. To make this a viable business, the resulting product must reach a wide audience and sell well. The industry has consciously not targeted education for this reason. Those companies who have ventured into this area, have traditionally aimed at the younger age group. Knowing that their parents will buy what is perceived as an educational game. However, it takes only a few nanoseconds for a child to realize that most educational games are homework and not a game.
  • This course will be covered over 15 units. In general, the lecture will be 45 minutes followed by a 90 minute practical lab session, however, this may vary slightly with two lectures being put together. The course is group work with group assessment. Grades will be given for innovation, quality, and completeness of the output. A professional standard is required.
  • You are required to keep an online development blog, and it should be updated every week. You can make this creative and have some fun with it. It will be viewed by your lecturer and comments will be added. The main output of this course is an educational computer game concept document. The content of this document will be based on concept documents used in the commercial game industry. However, the format of your submission can be creative and used to “sell” your idea. At the end of semester, we will have the “Golden Pineapple Awards”. Think of these as the “oscars” of this class. Groups will be chosen as winner of categories like best original idea, best commercial potential, and best in show. Photos and screenshots will be displayed on the Institutes web site, and the winners of last years best in show were invited to present to the director of the Kunsthaus - great potential for your future career. You will be require to present your work for judging for these awards. The winners will then be announced during a celebration at the end of term.
  • During this course, you will learn many new terms used in academia. Pedagogy is the science of education and as a science it has its own language. Terms such as scaffolding will be introduced as will the dynamics of game-based learning. You will also become aware of how the computer game industry, a billion plus market, is structured and how it functions. And hopefully, along the way you will reflect on your own learning process by reading your early entries in the group blog. As this course is given in English, it is a great chance for you to practice yours.
  • The course centers around a role play of a game development company. Each of your within your team, will take responsibility for a specific role. These will be detailed in a subsequent lecture. Each of you will also function within the group and assist with the completion of the work. However, at times you will be asked to assume the role that you have been assigned. This maybe project leader or quality assurance manager. You will design an educational game of your choice, and please be creative when developing your concepts, and you will complete a concept document and design marketing material in order to “sell” your concept to a publisher - think of the lecturer as the publishing company that will fund your project. The concept document will include technical specifications, which you will need to research, as well as artwork and gameplay design. The concept must be feasible and be able to be created if funding and resource was provided. You will also need to prototype your idea and analyze the usability. You will be shown how to do this in another session. Above all, take this class seriously. This role-play is based closely upon what happens in the real world and how the process of development occurs in a game design company.
  • Lectures during the semester will cover the listed topics. All the information you require to complete your concept document and assessed output will be provided. However, you must attend lectures to obtain this knowledge. Although the powerpoint slides will be made available after each lecture, the slides only contain bullet points and not the information that you will need. In addition to attending the lectures, listening quietly, taking notes, and asking questions where understanding is lacking, is also paramount to achieving the learning outcomes of this course. The topics are covered in the order that you will require them to complete the work. They will build on your knowledge of game-based learning and game development as we progress.
  • This course will be covered over 15 units. In general, the lecture will be 45 minutes followed by a 90 minute practical lab session, however, this may vary slightly with two lectures being put together. The course is group work with group assessment. Grades will be given for innovation, quality, and completeness of the output. A professional standard is required.
  • This course will be covered over 15 units. In general, the lecture will be 45 minutes followed by a 90 minute practical lab session, however, this may vary slightly with two lectures being put together. The course is group work with group assessment. Grades will be given for innovation, quality, and completeness of the output. A professional standard is required.
  • This course will be covered over 15 units. In general, the lecture will be 45 minutes followed by a 90 minute practical lab session, however, this may vary slightly with two lectures being put together. The course is group work with group assessment. Grades will be given for innovation, quality, and completeness of the output. A professional standard is required.
  • This course will be covered over 15 units. In general, the lecture will be 45 minutes followed by a 90 minute practical lab session, however, this may vary slightly with two lectures being put together. The course is group work with group assessment. Grades will be given for innovation, quality, and completeness of the output. A professional standard is required.
  • This course will be covered over 15 units. In general, the lecture will be 45 minutes followed by a 90 minute practical lab session, however, this may vary slightly with two lectures being put together. The course is group work with group assessment. Grades will be given for innovation, quality, and completeness of the output. A professional standard is required.
  • This course will be covered over 15 units. In general, the lecture will be 45 minutes followed by a 90 minute practical lab session, however, this may vary slightly with two lectures being put together. The course is group work with group assessment. Grades will be given for innovation, quality, and completeness of the output. A professional standard is required.
  • This course will be covered over 15 units. In general, the lecture will be 45 minutes followed by a 90 minute practical lab session, however, this may vary slightly with two lectures being put together. The course is group work with group assessment. Grades will be given for innovation, quality, and completeness of the output. A professional standard is required.
  • Educational games have always been low budget, low tech, poor cousins of the computer game industry. Up until recently, very few commercial companies provide good quality educational games. Historically, these games have been written by teachers and academics who wish to utilize the technology within there teaching, but usually do not have the skill, not the finance, to create a high quality product. Commercial recreational games cost millions of dollars to create and often have teams of a hundred on more people. To make this a viable business, the resulting product must reach a wide audience and sell well. The industry has consciously not targeted education for this reason. Those companies who have ventured into this area, have traditionally aimed at the younger age group. Knowing that their parents will buy what is perceived as an educational game. However, it takes only a few nanoseconds for a child to realize that most educational games are homework and not a game.
  • Educational games have always been low budget, low tech, poor cousins of the computer game industry. Up until recently, very few commercial companies provide good quality educational games. Historically, these games have been written by teachers and academics who wish to utilize the technology within there teaching, but usually do not have the skill, not the finance, to create a high quality product. Commercial recreational games cost millions of dollars to create and often have teams of a hundred on more people. To make this a viable business, the resulting product must reach a wide audience and sell well. The industry has consciously not targeted education for this reason. Those companies who have ventured into this area, have traditionally aimed at the younger age group. Knowing that their parents will buy what is perceived as an educational game. However, it takes only a few nanoseconds for a child to realize that most educational games are homework and not a game.
  • Educational games have always been low budget, low tech, poor cousins of the computer game industry. Up until recently, very few commercial companies provide good quality educational games. Historically, these games have been written by teachers and academics who wish to utilize the technology within there teaching, but usually do not have the skill, not the finance, to create a high quality product. Commercial recreational games cost millions of dollars to create and often have teams of a hundred on more people. To make this a viable business, the resulting product must reach a wide audience and sell well. The industry has consciously not targeted education for this reason. Those companies who have ventured into this area, have traditionally aimed at the younger age group. Knowing that their parents will buy what is perceived as an educational game. However, it takes only a few nanoseconds for a child to realize that most educational games are homework and not a game.
  • Educational games have always been low budget, low tech, poor cousins of the computer game industry. Up until recently, very few commercial companies provide good quality educational games. Historically, these games have been written by teachers and academics who wish to utilize the technology within there teaching, but usually do not have the skill, not the finance, to create a high quality product. Commercial recreational games cost millions of dollars to create and often have teams of a hundred on more people. To make this a viable business, the resulting product must reach a wide audience and sell well. The industry has consciously not targeted education for this reason. Those companies who have ventured into this area, have traditionally aimed at the younger age group. Knowing that their parents will buy what is perceived as an educational game. However, it takes only a few nanoseconds for a child to realize that most educational games are homework and not a game.
  • Educational games have always been low budget, low tech, poor cousins of the computer game industry. Up until recently, very few commercial companies provide good quality educational games. Historically, these games have been written by teachers and academics who wish to utilize the technology within there teaching, but usually do not have the skill, not the finance, to create a high quality product. Commercial recreational games cost millions of dollars to create and often have teams of a hundred on more people. To make this a viable business, the resulting product must reach a wide audience and sell well. The industry has consciously not targeted education for this reason. Those companies who have ventured into this area, have traditionally aimed at the younger age group. Knowing that their parents will buy what is perceived as an educational game. However, it takes only a few nanoseconds for a child to realize that most educational games are homework and not a game.
  • Designing Games, Motivating Students, and Entrepreneurship

    1. 1. “Designing Games, Motivating Students, and Entrepreneurship”
    2. 2.  Focusing on Mobile platforms (Tablets & Smartphones)  Targeting anytime/anywhere learning, any age group  Developing Apps for Health, Sustainability, & eInclusion
    3. 3.  14 Day course – 4-5 ECTS  1-2 x 30 minute Lectures per day  1 x 15 minute Expert session per day  3 x 90 minute practical work  Group work  3-4 students in each group.  Serious Game Design  Concept design, design documents, development plan, prototype.  Group assessment:  Innovation, quality, completeness.
    4. 4.  Submission requirements for assessment….  Completed game design concept document  All topics addressed as per lectures  Professional format and creative design  Prototype product  5-minute group presentation  Attendance of 80% of the course
    5. 5.  Outcomes of this course….  Game design for smart phones and tablets  Game industry awareness and business opportunities  Work and collaboration in intercultural project teams  Applied project management and time/ resource planning  Knowledge of Health, Sustainability, & eInclusion sectors/issues  Communication and Presentation techniques  Problem solving skills  Entrepreneurship
    6. 6.  Define your team:  Roles, project phases, time line.  Define your game:  Title, genre, target audience.  Define your concept:  Abstract, gameplay, game elements.  Test your concept:  Play analysis, prototype usability.  Create your Document, Prototype and Presentation:  Innovative, informative, professional.
    7. 7.  Course overview, Serious Game Design  Industry roles, Concept documents and the development cycle  Storyboards, Scripts & Characters  Educational games and learning outcomes  Player interaction and Sound Design  Cultural, Gender & Social  Development Environments  Iterative Game Development & Playability  Animation & Androids  Pitching, Presentations and Promotion
    8. 8. 1. Forming Teams 2. Forming Ideas 3. Using Blogs 4. Involve Experts 5. Iterative Testing 6. Presentations
    9. 9.  Early team work  Mixed Gender  Mixed Culture  Mixed Skill Set
    10. 10.  Well Researched Topics  Report back to Class  Ensure alignment of: Target Audience Platform Concept
    11. 11.  Encourage Daily Reflection  Branding assists with: Ownership Entrepreneurship Investment
    12. 12.  Ask Industry, experts, other teachers  Provide Variety of Topics  Look for a SuperStar!
    13. 13.  Continual Testing within Groups and Target Audience if Possible  Test concept, format, platform
    14. 14.  Pecha Kucha Style  Encourage Practice  Show Bad Presentation Examples
    15. 15. summerschool.engagelearning.eu
    16. 16. summerschool.engagelearning.eu
    17. 17. “Designing Games, Motivating Students, and Entrepreneurship” www.paulpivec.com www.piveclabs.com

    ×