Mario's Tips on Driver Safety

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Mario's Tips on Driver Safety

  1. 1. Know your M.A.R.I.O.S. M ARIO A NDRETTI’S R EAL I NFORMATION ON S AFETY
  2. 2. from Mario I’m very happy to be visiting your school and meeting all of you. I’ve been traveling around the country visiting with students like you and talking about driving and tire safety. Why? Because it’s very important to me. When you are speeding around a racetrack, you have to trust yourself, your car and your fellow drivers. While you may not be driving at such high speeds, or at least you better not be, it is equally important that you take steps to make sure you are safe on the road. You may not be able to control your fellow drivers, but you can learn how to trust our own skills as a driver and learn about your vehicle. If you’re not doing everything you can to be safe on the road, then the roads aren’t safe for anyone. We’re in cars every day, and the first thing we all must do is wear our seat belts. In racecars our seat belts look more like harnesses, but they serve the same purpose, to keep us safe. It doesn’t matter if you’re driving around the corner or driving to a friend’s house a few miles away—seat belts save lives. It’s really that simple. And, in nearly every case, it’s the law. Driving around a race track you learn a lot about your car. You also learn about how important your tire pressure and tread are. I depended on my Firestone tires to help me win races, but I was responsible for their upkeep. Even if you’re a very safe driver, it’s important for your car to be in safe condition, too. You can take a number of simple steps that don’t take a lot of time but can make a big difference in terms of safety on the road. Again, I stress this because it’s important for your overall safety—and for everyone else on the road. I hope you will find this book useful. I know you don’t think about things like car maintenance every day—but you need to do things like check your tire pressure and tire tread at least on a monthly basis. Plus, if you take care of these things, they will last longer, and you won’t be spending money on replacements and repairs! If you want to do more research about driving safety online, you can check out the following Web sites: tiresafety.com - Sponsored by Bridgestone Firestone driversedge.com - Driver’s Edge, a national teen driving program rma.org - The Rubber Manufacturers Association nhtsa.dot.gov - The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Thank you for inviting me to your school. Safe driving! 1 < tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov
  3. 3. Section One PRE TEST WHAT DO YOU ALREADY KNOW ABOUT CAREFUL DRIVING AND TIRE SAFETY? 1. From a safety standpoint, in particular, it’s very important to properly inflate your tires...why? A. the tires will look better B. underinflated tires can be incapable of properly supporting the vehicle load and can be damaged—increasing the risk of tire failure C. you’ll get better gas mileage D. you’ll get safer performance when driving fast 2. You should check your air pressure every... A. month B. 3 months C. 6 months D. year 3. Air pressure should be checked... A. right after a long road trip B. after the car has not been driven for a while and the tires are cold C. daily after work or school D. when the tires are hot 4. The vehicle manufacturer determines the correct inflation pressure for your vehicle’s tires. The best place to find the recommended tire pressure for most vehicles’ tires is...*^ A. the vehicle’s owner’s manual or tire information placard B. the door jamb C. directly from the tire manufacturer (including its Web site) D. both A & B 5. As a general guideline, tires should be rotated...* A. every 1,000 to 4,000 miles B. every 5,000 to 8,000 miles C. every 14,000 to 17,000 miles D. never 6. You can check to see if your tires are bald (lacking tread) by using what common item?* A. a tire pressure gauge B. a credit card C. a penny D. a pencil tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov >2
  4. 4. PRE TEST (continued) 7. You can tell if a tire is properly inflated within a few pounds of its recommended pressure...* A. by looking at it B. by kicking it C. with a pressure gauge D. with a penny 8. Underinflation may lead to tire failure.* A. true B. false 9. Which factors can affect the condition of your tires?* A. outside air temperature B. vehicle load C. tire pressure D. all of the above 10. According to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration statistics, approximately how many accidents occur in the rain each year?^ + A. 1,000 B. 10,000 C. 100,000 D. 1,000,000 11. What is hydroplaning? = A. when a film of water comes between your tires and the road causing the vehicle to lose traction B. when you accelerate aggressively and spin the tires C. the term to describe when a traction control system is engaged on a vehicle D. the term to describe an aggressive driver 12. If you believe that you are hydroplaning you should...+ A. hit the brakes B. ease off the gas C. turn away from the skid D. take your hands off the steering wheel and scream 13. This term, referring to a dangerous road condition, describes a very thin and often almost invisible layer of ice that makes the road look wet and shiny.^ A. slush B. melting ice C. black ice D. snow 3 < tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov
  5. 5. 14. In 2003, 57 percent of 16- to 20-year-old passenger vehicle occupants killed in crashes were...^ A. talking on a cell phone B. not wearing a seat belt C. driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol D. driving without a valid license 15. Of the following, which is the most critical element in proper driving? = A. knowing when to signal B. using your eyes and being aware C. obeying the speed limit D. the 3-second rule 16. If your vehicle leaves the roadway, you should...^ A. immediately jerk the wheel to pull back on the road B. brake as quickly as you can -- then, when no one is around you, pull back onto the roadway C. gradually reduce speed -- then, when it’s safe to do so, ease the vehicle back onto the roadway D. take your hands off the steering wheel and scream 17. Overloading your vehicle has no impact on your tires if they are at the correct pressure.* ^ Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, www.SafeCar.gov A. true (http://www.rma.org/tire_safety/tire_maintenance_and_safety/quizzes/) B. false 18. Your vehicle is traveling at 60 mph. In an accident situation, a one- second delay in getting your foot on the brake pedal will cause your * Source: Rubber Manufacturers Association, www.rma.org vehicle to travel approximately how many additional feet before coming to a stop? = A. 25 = Source: Driver’s Edge, www.driversedge.com B. 10 C. 400 D. 90 19. How often is someone killed by a drunk driver? = + Source: www.TireSafety.com A. every 31 minutes B. every hour C. every 4.2 hours D. every 8 hours 20. Tire tread is the portion of the tire that contacts the road surface. A. true B. false tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov >4
  6. 6. Section Two MARIO’S TIPS ON DRIVER SAFETY It’s important to know how different weather conditions affect your tires and your car, no matter the climate in which you’re driving. WET WEATHER April showers can bring pretty flowers as well as dented fenders. According to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration statistics, nearly one million vehicle accidents a year occur in wet weather. Many of these rainy-day wrecks are caused by motorists failing to appreciate the vast difference between driving in wet and dry conditions. To drive safely on wet pavement, you have to recognize the demands that you, your vehicle and your tires face. It’s very different than driving on dry pavement, but many motorists fail to change techniques and attention. That’s when many wet weather accidents occur. Mario’s wet weather driving tips include: • Slow down. You reduce the risk of hydroplaning should you run into deeper water puddled on the road. Wet weather also affects your brakes, so you need to drive slower in these conditions. • Maintain a safe distance. Even with a good wet weather tire, be prepared for longer stopping distances on wet pavement. Since other cars may not have proper tires for wet weather driving, be extra alert at stop signs and red lights. 5 < tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov
  7. 7. • Choose tires carefully. Too many drivers buy a tire based on initial price or appearance. For optimum performance in the rain, select a tire with tread design and rubber compounds that provide enhanced wet weather driving capabilities. • Properly maintain your tires. No tire can provide good wet traction once the tread is worn below 2/32nd’s of an inch (0.16cm) tread depth. Check your tires regularly and replace them at the proper time. Also, maintain the proper air pressure in your tires; check your vehicle manufacturer’s handbook or the door jamb for the proper air pressure for your particular vehicle and tires. • Go smoothly. When braking, accelerating or turning, avoid jerky, abrupt movements. • Avoid hydroplaning. If you feel your vehicle starting to hydroplane (riding on the surface of the water), take your foot off the accelerator— and don’t hit your brakes. If you have a manual transmission, it may be necessary to depress the clutch petal and reduce gear; then re-engage the clutch after you gain control. • Plan your braking. If you are entering a curve, slow down and brake gently before you start to turn. • Turn on your lights. In most states, it’s required by law when it’s raining. It will help other drivers see you. • Check your wipers. Install new wiper blades at least once a year to ensure good vision. These tips can be shortened to “T & T.” Source: www.TireSafety.com/driving Think and Tires. Think about your driving and install good tires for wet weather. Once you’ve installed the tires, keep them inflated properly and replace them when tread-wear indicator bars show. Don’t be shy about asking for information from your tire dealer. Your safety—and mine—could depend on your tires and how you think. tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov >6
  8. 8. MARIO’S TIPS ON DRIVER SAFETY (continued) LEARNING TO D.R.I.V.E. Driver Awareness Always have an out! What this means is never put yourself in a situation where you wouldn’t be able to do anything if you needed to take evasive action. You always have to be prepared for the worst case scenario. Expect the driver in front of you to slam on his or her brakes. Be ready for that truck to turn into your lane. Watch out for that oncoming car making a left turn in front of you. Be looking for that small child who chases his or her ball into the street. When one of these events happens, what can you do? Whether you are driving down a city street or the open highway, you must always be aware of your surroundings. Schools and office buildings have escape plans in case of emergencies. You should have an escape plan mapped out as you drive. By becoming familiar with a few simple techniques, you will greatly increase your awareness behind the wheel, and you will realize just how uneducated the average driver really is. If you are following too closely behind the car in front of you and the driver of that car hits the brakes . . . CONGRATULATIONS! You’ve just had a collision. ALWAYS LEAVE YOURSELF AN OUT! Most driver education courses teach the four-second or two-second rule, which involves picking a stationary spot and pacing yourself so you are two or four seconds behind the car in front of you. Be aware that this places your focus solely on the vehicle in front of you, not on what’s happening on the highway. It also does not account for inclement weather conditions or other variables of which you need to be aware. You can utilize all of the rules and advice you receive and also use your common sense. Use your head and remember how to DRIVE. If the vehicle in front of you suddenly stops, can you avoid a collision? Are you able to see around or through the vehicle in front of you to have a clear view of the road ahead? If the answer to either of these questions is “no,” then back off and allow for a greater safety margin. If you have to count to determine whether you’re keeping a safe distance, you shouldn’t be on the road in the first place. 7 < tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov
  9. 9. Vision Your eyes are the most important tools that you have as a driver. At 60 mph, a vehicle travels nearly 90 feet per second. A lot can happen in 90 feet. Imagine how many collisions could be avoided by simply looking just one second further down the road. It’s all about being aware. In order to see the big picture, you need to use your eyes properly. This is one of the most important rules of driving. Instead of focusing your attention four seconds in front of you, look as far ahead as possible. By doing so, you are able to see situations that may be 12 to15 seconds, or even further, down the highway. You will be able to plan your escape route in case any evasive actions need to occur. You’ll know if there’s a clear lane on your left. You’ll know if you have to slow down. You’ll give yourself plenty of time to react. And remember to always check your mirrors. You should be just as aware of what is behind you as you are of what is in front of you. A majority of drivers simply look directly in front of them and react to what’s happening around them. A good driver looks ahead and anticipates what’s going to happen next, not just react to what has all ready happened. Just like in many sports, if you have to REACT to something, a mistake has already happened. As a good driver, you want to ANTICIPATE everything that you do. tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov >8
  10. 10. MARIO’S TIPS ON DRIVER SAFETY (continued) Always look where you want to go. Your eyes will act as a guide to help keep the vehicle on its correct path. If you ski or snowboard, do you constantly look down at your skis or board? Or do you focus down the mountain to where you want to go? The same principle applies in driving. D.R.I.V.E. Defensive driving requires efficient management of time and space. Both can be achieved through effective use of advanced driving It is better to techniques. To master these techniques, you must first learn to D.R.I.V.E. ANTICIPATE than it is to REACT! D - Develop Develop proper driving habits, which include always wearing your seat belt. Constantly check your mirrors and your surroundings. Using your eyes properly is one of the most important rules in driving. It is important to see and be seen. Try to avoid driving in the blind spot of other drivers. R - Recognize A driver needs to be conditioned to recognize the constantly changing road and traffic conditions. Use your eyes! Proper use of vision is vital. I - Identify The next step is to identify those situations that may become hazardous: the vehicle merging on the freeway, the car pulling out into traffic, a playground full of children close to the road, the vehicle turning left in Your eyes act front of you, etc. as a guide. Look where you V - Visualize want to go! As these situations develop, visualize the steps necessary to avoid a collision situation. How quickly can you stop? Is it safe to switch lanes? And so on. E - Execute Finally, execute whatever driving maneuvers are required to avoid a collision situation: change lanes, slow down, accelerate, etc. If a collision avoidance situation occurs, this is where it’s important to be aware of the true abilities, and the limitations, of both you and your vehicle. 9 < tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov
  11. 11. Skid Control How do you control a skid? CPR—Correct, Pause and Recovery—is the easiest way to remember the necessary steps. Those are the three steps involved in correcting an oversteer situation or skid. The first step is to correct. That’s the easy part. Correct simply means to turn the steering wheel in the direction of the skid. Step two is the most difficult. As the vehicle slides, the vehicle’s suspension becomes loaded or bound up. The pause is the split second when the rear wheels regain traction before the suspension unloads. It is during the pause that you achieve the final phase and recover, which simply means to straighten out the wheel. If you do not catch the pause, you have a fishtail effect in which the car will begin to slide from side to side. It is this last step that is the most difficult. The vehicle is already sliding in one direction. As the skid dissipates, the rear end will regain traction. “For every action, there is an equal and It is at that moment that the steering wheel needs to be brought back opposite reaction.” straight because the compressed energy in the suspension will unload Sir Isaac Newton and spring back to the other side, which can cause a fishtail effect. This secondary spin can occur twice as quickly and be twice as violent as the initial slide. This is due to the unloading of the compressed energy and the fact that you are now steering with the skid instead of into the skid. Your eyes act as a guide. During a skid, if you feel that you have any chance of regaining control of the vehicle, your feet should do nothing. No gas, no brakes, nothing. “When in doubt both, feet out.” Just correct everything with the steering wheel and once the situation is recovered, THEN use the appropriate pedal. However, if you find yourself in a spin and out of control, remember “in a spin, both feet in.” When in doubt, That means that when you realize you can’t regain control of the vehicle, get both feet out. as hard as you can on the brake and put the clutch in if you have a manual transmission. In a spin, both feet in. You put the brake on to stop the car as quickly as possible. If you have a clutch, it needs to be pressed so that you keep the engine running. When the car comes to rest, you may be in a dangerous position, so it would be in your best interest not to stall the vehicle. tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov > 10
  12. 12. MARIO’S TIPS ON DRIVER SAFETY (continued) DRINKING AND DRIVING The law says that you have to be 21 years of age to drink alcohol. Unfortunately, reality is a bit different. According to statistics listed on the Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Web site, more than 94 percent of twelfth graders, 84 percent of tenth graders and 65 percent of eighth graders report that alcohol is “very easy” or “fairly easy” to get. The best way to avoid an alcohol-related accident is not to drink. We all must be aware of the consequences. If you are a teenager and you choose to drink alcohol, you are breaking the law. If you combine drinking with driving, it can become deadly. • There were 17,013 alcohol-related fatalities in 2003; 40 percent of the Teens have little total traffic fatalities. driving experience. • Someone is killed in an alcohol-related accident every 31 minutes. Teens have little drinking experience. • In 2003, 25 percent of 15-to 20-year-old drivers killed in motor vehicle crashes had a blood alcohol content of 0.08 g/dl or higher. It’s a deadly combination. • In 2003, 74 percent of young drivers (15 to 20 years old) killed in fatal crashes who had been drinking were not wearing seat belts. This message is not just for teens. Use your head. Do not drink and drive. The consequences are just not worth it. Remember, if you are driving, you are not only responsible for yourself, but also for the lives of your friends and others on the road. So if you are going to drink, get a designated driver, take a cab or make other arrangements. No matter how Source: www.driversedge.com in control you think you are, even the smallest amount of alcohol can affect your reflexes. 11 < tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov
  13. 13. Section Three TIRE SAFETY Tire maintenance is another important step in your overall safety. Proper maintenance also helps ensure that your tires will last longer — saving you money! Here are some simple tips from www.TireSafety.com to help you properly inflate, rotate and evaluate your tires. JUST A LOOK WON’T DO IT. One of these tires is actually ten pounds underinflated. Your eyes can deceive you, so rely on a good tire gauge for an accurate reading. 30 PSI 20 PSI LOWER PRESSURE INCREASES HEAT. Infared photography of tires tested at high speed. Damaging heat increases as inflation pressure drops. DANGER! Excessive heat results in tire damage. 30 PSI 20 PSI Based on tires size P235/75R15 LOOK FOR THE MANUFACTURER’S RECOMMENDED AIR PRESSURE. It is listed on the sticker of your vehicle’s door jamb or owner’s manual. EXAMPLE: tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov > 12
  14. 14. TIRE SAFETY (continued) THIS CHART SHOWS YOU HOW UNDERINFLATION CAN CREATE AN OVERLOAD ON TIRES. Always check your air pressure to make sure it’s up to standards, especially if you’re carrying extra weight. 30 PSI 20 PSI Gross vehicle weight = 6840 lbs. Gross vehicle weight = 6840 lbs. Tire carrying Tire carrying capacity at 30 psi = 6840 lbs. capacity at 20 psi = 5610 lbs. DANGER! Overloading results in tire damage. Based on tires size P235/75R15 These tires are 1230 lbs. OVERLOADED! This is equivalent to more than eight 150 lbs. people CHECK YOUR TIRE PRESSURE MONTHLY. ROTATE TIRES EVERY 5,000 MILES. www.nhtsa.dot.gov Source: www.tiresafety.com ROUTINELY LOOK FOR SIGNS OF TREAD WEAR OR DAMAGE. 13< tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov
  15. 15. TIRE SAFETY (continued) AIR PRESSURE — MONTHLY CHECK For accuracy, check your air pressure with a tire gauge when tires are cold. Driving heats up tires and makes the reading incorrect. A. Remove tire valve cap. B. Place the end of the tire gauge over valve. C. Press the tire gauge D. If needed, add air and straight and firmly until recheck pressure with the scale extends. the tire gauge. Source: NHTSA.dot.gov E. Replace valve caps. tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov > 14
  16. 16. TIRE SAFETY (continued) TIRE WEAR — VISUAL CHECK Check for obvious signs of wear. A. Exposed tread bars (replace) B. Irregular shoulder wear (have inspected) Place a penny in the tire as shown. If you can see the top of Lincoln’s head, the treads are worn and need replacing. C. Shoulder wear (have inspected) D. Center wear (have inspected) TIRE ROTATION For maximum mileage, rotate your tire every 5,000 miles (8,000km). Follow the correct rotation patterns: Rear and Four Wheel Drive Vehicles Front Wheel Drive Vehicles FRONT BACK 15 < tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov
  17. 17. WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED?
  18. 18. Section Four POST TEST 1. From a safety standpoint, in particular, it’s very important to properly inflate your tires...why? A. the tires will look better B. underinflated tires can be incapable of properly supporting the vehicle load and can be damaged—increasing the risk of tire failure C. you’ll get better gas mileage D. you’ll get safer performance when driving fast 2. You should check your air pressure every... A. month B. 3 months C. 6 months D. year 3. Air pressure should be checked... A. right after a long road trip B. after the car has not been driven for a while and the tires are cold C. daily after work or school D. when the tires are hot 4. The vehicle manufacturer determines the correct inflation pressure for your vehicle’s tires. The best place to find the recommended tire pressure for most vehicles’ tires is...*^ A. the vehicle’s owner’s manual or tire information placard B. the door jamb C. directly from the tire manufacturer (including their Web site) D. both A & B 5. As a general guideline, tires should be rotated...* A. every 1,000 to 4,000 miles B. every 5,000 to 8,000 miles C. every 14,000 to 17,000 miles D. never 6. You can check to see if your tires are bald (lacking tread) by using KEY: 1-B, 2-A, 3-B, 4-D, 5-B, 6-C, what common item?* A. a tire pressure gauge B. a credit card C. a penny D. a pencil 17 < tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov
  19. 19. POST TEST (continued) 7. You can tell if a tire is properly inflated within a few pounds of its recommended pressure...* A. by looking at it B. by kicking it C. with a pressure gauge D. with a penny 8. Underinflation may lead to tire failure.* A. true B. false 9. Which factors can affect the condition of your tires?* A. outside air temperature B. vehicle load C. tire pressure D. all of the above 10. According to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration statistics, approximately how many accidents occur in the rain each year?^ + A. 1,000 B. 10,000 C. 100,000 D. 1,000,000 11. What is hydroplaning? = A. when a film of water comes between your tires and the road causing the vehicle to lose traction B. when you accelerate aggressively and spin the tires C. the term to describe when a traction control system is engaged on a vehicle D. the term to describe an aggressive driver 12. If you believe that you are hydroplaning you should...+ A. hit the brakes KEY: 7-C, 8-A, 9-D, 10-D, 11-A, 12-B, 13-C B. ease off the gas C. turn away from the skid D. take your hands off the steering wheel and scream 13. This term, referring to a dangerous road condition, describes a very thin and often almost invisible layer of ice that makes the road look wet and shiny.^ A. slush B. melting ice C. black ice D. snow tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov > 18
  20. 20. POST TEST (continued) 14. In 2003, 57 percent of 16- to 20-year-old passenger vehicle occupants killed in crashes were...^ A. talking on a cell phone B. not wearing a seat belt C. driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol D. driving without a valid license 15. Of the following, which is the most critical element in proper driving? = A. knowing when to signal B. using your eyes and being aware C. obeying the speed limit D. the 3-second rule 16. If your vehicle leaves the roadway, you should...^ A. immediately jerk the wheel to pull back on the road B. brake as quickly as you can -- then, when no one is around you, pull back onto the roadway C. gradually reduce speed -- then, when it’s safe to do so, ease the vehicle back onto the roadway D. take your hands off the steering wheel and scream 17. Overloading your vehicle has no impact on your tires if they are at the correct pressure.* ^ Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, www.SafeCar.gov A. true (http://www.rma.org/tire_safety/tire_maintenance_and_safety/quizzes/) B. false 18. Your vehicle is traveling at 60 mph. In an accident situation, a one- second delay in getting your foot on the brake pedal will cause your * Source: Rubber Manufacturers Association, www.rma.org vehicle to travel approximately how many additional feet before coming to a stop? = A. 25 = Source: Driver’s Edge, www.driversedge.com B. 10 C. 400 KEY: 14-B, 15-B, 16-C, 17-B, 18-D, 17-A, 20-A D. 90 19. How often is someone killed by a drunk driver? = + Source: www.TireSafety.com A. every 31 minutes B. every hour C. every 4.2 hours D. every 8 hours 20. Tire tread is the portion of the tire that contacts the road surface. A. true B. false 19 < tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov
  21. 21. notes tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov > 20
  22. 22. notes 21 < tiresafety.com • driversedge.com • rma.org • nhtsa.dot.gov
  23. 23. For more information, visit www.tiresafety.com. © Bridgestone Firestone North American Tire, LLC BF 51196 9-1-2005

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