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What the tale survey shows about the importance of the arts in school

What the tale survey shows about the importance of the arts in school

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These slides show the comparison between students in the TALE research and their peers who responded to the national Taking Part survey. More information is available on researchtale.net

These slides show the comparison between students in the TALE research and their peers who responded to the national Taking Part survey. More information is available on researchtale.net

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What the tale survey shows about the importance of the arts in school

  1. 1. The TALE Project: Tracking Arts Learning and Engagement What the TALE survey shows about the importance of the arts in school Christine Hall, Pat Thomson Lexi Earl & Corinna Geppert
  2. 2. survey sample 4,477 questionnaires were completed in the school years 2016/17 and 2017/18. Region East E1 (281) E2 (1) E3 (192) E4 (1) E5 (145) Region South West SW1 (125) SW2 (182) SW3 (57) SW4 (114) Region South/London S1 (369) S2 (-) S3 (145) S4 (260) S5 (28) S6 (64) S7 (187) S8 (-) S9 (-) S10 (72) Region West W1 (213) W2 (12) W3 (374) W4 (34) W5 (88) W6 (5) W7 (-) Region North N1 (163) N2 (601) N3 (438) N4 (233)
  3. 3. popularity of arts-related activities 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 films music ICT-use festivals and arts events visual arts and crafts dance drama literature Student involvement in the arts least involved averagely involved highly involved average
  4. 4. school level effects: the development of interest in the arts 6% 16% 21% 22% 19% 15% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% Strongly agree Agree Neither agree or disagree Disagree Strongly disagree Not sure School started my interest in the arts. 12% 33% 20% 9% 11% 15% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% Strongly agree Agree Neither agree or disagree Disagree Strongly disagree Not sure School has supported my interest in the arts.
  5. 5. comparing TALE and Taking Part survey findings 2010/11 211/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 TALE- sub- sample 14 year- olds 224 152 182 157 148 126 152 15 year- olds 213 147 156 157 132 141 123 total 437 437 437 437 437 437 275 Taking Part is a continuous face-to- face household survey across England, conducted annually since 2005. It includes data about the everyday engagement of young people in arts and culture. Using a matched sub-sample of 136 female and 139 male 14/15 year olds, we compared patterns over six years in the Taking Part data with the TALE survey findings.
  6. 6. school level effects: (ii) everyday creative practice 52% 21% 27% 15% 52% 24% 22% 16% 52% 24% 22% 16% 44% 19% 20% 10% 47% 21% 19% 11% 72% 58% 25% 33% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Paint/draw Take Photographs Do Craftwork Create Films 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 TALE 2016-2018 15% 14% 15%17% 14% 17% 13% 12% 15%13% 12% 15%14% 13% 15% 29% 15% 19% 55% 29% 28% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Play a Musical Instrument Create Music Sing in a Band/Choir 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 TALE 2016-2018
  7. 7. school level effects: (iii) everyday creative practice 68% 18% 67% 24% 64% 20% 64% 20% 67% 18% 59% 19% 68% 43% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Read a Book out of School Perform in a Play 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 TALE 2016-2018 11% 8% 6% 13% 14% 14%12% 12% 11%12% 12% 11%12% 10% 10%11% 12% 10% 27% 23% 22% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Perform Dance Create a Dance Take Part in a Dance Club 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 TALE 2016-2018
  8. 8. school level effects: (iv) everyday cultural engagement 56% 68% 58% 70% 53% 61% 53% 61% 51% 61% 46% 38% 46% 61% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Art Museums Libraries 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 TALE 2016-2018 79% 32% 7% 77% 34% 12% 77% 31% 10% 77% 31% 10% 78% 28% 10% 74% 25% 9% 95% 53% 31% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Cinemas Live Music Events Dance Performance 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 TALE 2016-2018
  9. 9. what follows from these findings • Schools where there is a commitment to offering a rounded arts curriculum have a significant impact on the cultural engagement of students in that school generally • Young people from arts and culture rich schools are more likely to participate in everyday creative activities and go to cultural events. This happens even when they are not formally studying arts subjects but are in the environment of a school rich in the arts and culture. • Attending an arts and culture rich school develops young people’s out-of-school interests in the arts and culture. • School plays a critical role in influencing young people’s participation in arts and culture. A third of young people will only access a broad range of arts and cultural opportunities if they are offered through school.
  10. 10. references • The Tracking Arts and Learning Engagement Project (TALE). Key Stage 4 and 5 students’ participation in arts and cultural activities: Who does what? Overall survey results 2018: https://researchtale.net/publications/ • The Tracking Arts and Learning Engagement Project (TALE). Key Stage 4 and 5 students’ participation in arts and cultural activities: Who does what? WAVE 1 survey results: https://researchtale.net/publications/ • Department for Culture, Media and Sport. (2011). Taking Part: the National Survey of Culture, Leisure and Sport, 2010-2011; Adult and Child Data. [data collection]. UK Data Service. SN: 6855, http://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN- 6855-1 • Department for Culture, Media and Sport. (2013). Taking Part: the National Survey of Culture, Leisure and Sport, 2011-2012; Adult and Child Data. [data collection]. UK Data Service. SN: 7222, http://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN- 7222-1 • Department for Culture, Media and Sport. (2013). Taking Part: the National Survey of Culture, Leisure and Sport, 2012-2013; Adult and Child Data. [data collection]. UK Data Service. SN: 7371, http://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN- 7371-1 • Department for Culture, Media and Sport. (2015). Taking Part: the National Survey of Culture, Leisure and Sport, 2013-2014; Adult and Child Data. [data collection]. UK Data Service. SN: 7709, http://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN- 7709-1 • Department for Culture, Media and Sport. (2016). Taking Part: the National Survey of Culture, Leisure and Sport, 2014-2015; Adult and Child Data. [data collection]. UK Data Service. SN: 7872, http://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN- 7872-1 • Department for Culture, Media and Sport. (2016). Taking Part: the National Survey of Culture, Leisure and Sport, 2015-2016; Adult and Child Data. [data collection]. UK Data Service. SN: 8070, http://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN- 8070-1

Editor's Notes

  • Chris - slides 1-7

    TALE, Tracking Arts Learning and Engagement.
    3 year longitudinal research project funded by Arts Council England, with the TATE and the RSC.
    30 case studies of secondary schools spread around the country, Cornwall to Newcastle.
    Sample of 30 schools selected on the basis that either a teacher or the school had a professional development relationship with either the RSC or Tate.
    We took this to be an indicator of a reasonable level of interest and commitment to the arts.
    So this is a purposive sample, chosen to help us investigate the impact of taking the arts seriously in school.
    We focused on students who were taking arts subjects who were in years 10,11,12 at start of the project and followed them through over the three years (12,13,14 by end) talking to them in focus group interviews.
    We tracked and did in depth interviews with two arts teachers in each school, including one who was involved with the RSC or Tate.
    In year 2 of the project we surveyed all students in years 10-13 about their engagement in arts and cultural activities. We’ve got about 4500 survey responses.
  • The TALE survey offers insights into some of the benefits to students of attending schools that take arts and cultural education seriously. The survey was open to all students in years 10-13 in the sample schools, (not just those who had chosen arts subjects). It aimed to find out about young people’s engagement in arts and cultural activities in and out of school. The survey was administered online and on a paper versionl at the end of the second year of the research project (2016/17) and the beginning of the third year (2017/18).
    .
    The survey shows young people’s generally high levels of cultural engagement. The main findings in this area show that:
     Students’ interests in the arts range across a variety of forms. Nearly all of those surveyed (91%) listen to music daily; about three-quarters of them (74%) sometimes paint or draw; over half (53%) read books or comics outside school at least once a month.
     
    Students are enthusiastic audience members. 79% of those surveyed had attended a live music performance in the previous year. Almost all students are interested in films: 43% visit cinemas at least once a month and 60% watch a film at least once a week. 36% of students had attended a dance performance and more than half (52%) had visited an art museum in the previous year.
     

  • Students are creative in their spare time. 40% had created stories, plays or poems on their own at least once or twice in the past year; 31% are involved in producing, writing or creating music. 34% had created computer games. A third of students engage in photography, drawing or painting at least once a week. Over a third (35%) make models or sculptures once a year or more often. Over a quarter of the students (27%) regularly work with textiles or engage in craft work such as jewellery making, wood or metal work (26%). 13% of students create their own films at least once a month. 28% had created new dance routines in the previous year.
     
    Students are interested in arts learning out of school. Many join arts groups and enjoy performing. Nearly one third (32%) of students take part in out of school music lessons or projects and 60% play a musical instrument or device. 29% sing as part of a band or choir. About a quarter (23%) belong to drama or theatre groups out of school. 28% are in dance clubs and 25% take dance lessons. 13% had performed poetry in the previous year and 12% are part of a book group or club.
     
    Students use ICT to explore, share and discuss their interests in the arts. Half of the students (51%) use websites to research the arts; more than a quarter (26%) use them to share and discuss arts. 16% of students have created their own arts related blog, website or podcast.
     
    For a significant minority of students, engagement in out of school arts activities is a daily event. 20% read, 11% paint or draw and 16% take photographs every day. 26% of students play a musical instrument very regularly.
     
    Engagement in the arts promotes a sense of personal wellbeing. Nearly half (45%) say that engagement in the arts helps them relax and reduces stress. This is particularly the case for females (53%) and for sixth form students (49%). Only 22% of students actively disagree with the idea that engagement with the arts has a positive effect on wellbeing.
     
    However, it is also clear that there is not a level playing field: some students experience more barriers to cultural engagement.
     
    If we divide the students into three groups – highly involved, averagely involved and not very involved – we find that:
    Students who are highly engaged in one arts activity are more likely to participate in other forms of arts activity as well
    The highly involved group particularly engage with music, drama and dance
    Students who are least involved with arts are most likely to be involved with film, music, visual art or craft
    There are slightly more females (6%) than males (4%) in the highly involved group. 28% of the 112 students who identify as non-binary are in this group
    Males make up 78% of the least involved group
    White British (66%), Asian British Bangladeshi (77%) and Asian British Pakistani (64%) are the least involved ethnic groups
    Almost a quarter (23%) of students with a physical disability and 14% of students with learning difficulties (compared to 5% of those without physical disabilities or learning difficulties) are in the highly involved group.

  • School has a significant impact on students’ engagement with the arts. Overall, 45% of students think that their school supports their interest in the arts. Females are more likely than males to think this (51% v 34%). 22% of students generally, and a quarter of students with disabilities, say that school started off their interest in the arts.
     
    Families are also important in encouraging young people’s engagement in the arts. Overall, 38% of students think their family supports their interest in the arts. However, about a quarter of the students (26%) do not receive encouragement from their families, and a further 15% are not sure about family support. Females (45%) are more likely than males (26%) to be encouraged to participate in the arts.
     
    A small but significant proportion (17%) of students think that an arts organisation has helped them develop their interest in the arts. More females (21%) than males (9%) feel this way, and older students are more likely to think it than younger ones.
     
    For a significant proportion of students (36%), school is where almost all their arts engagement takes place. This is the case for more females (39%) than males (31%), and for more younger than older students (37% year 10s and 11s, 32% year 12s and 13s).
     
    The arts feature strongly in students’ plans for the future. More than a third (36%) plan to continue to participate in the arts in their own time. Over a quarter of the students (27%) have plans to study an arts subject; another quarter hope to get a job in the arts. There are clear gender differences in these plans: 31% females and 19% males plan to study the arts; 28% female and 20% male plan to get a job in the arts; 43% female and 23% male plan to participate in the arts in their own time.
     
    Many students (43%) would like to do more arts activities. More than half of the females (52%) and just over quarter of the males (27%) feel this way. 38% of students think that they do not have time to take part in arts activities because of school work. More females (42%) than males (31%) feel this way. 44% of students think they participated in more arts activities when they were younger. However, students with physical disabilities or learning difficulties are less likely to feel that their participation in the arts has declined as they have got older.
     
    There is a marked gender bias towards girls in the degree of support and encouragement received. About a quarter (26%) of females perceive that they are encouraged by two of the three sources of support, while only 15% of males feel this way.
     
    Support and encouragement make a difference to students’ engagement in the arts. 22% of the students who receive full support, (from school, family and an arts association) are highly involved in the arts. Of the students who receive no support or encouragement, only 4% are in the ‘highly involved’ group and 81% are in the ‘least involved’ group.
     
    These are the main findings from the survey. The full analysis is available as a separate report at www.researchtale.net.
  • To show the specific impact of arts rich schools on cultural engagement, we did a comparison with data collected by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport and Arts Council. The Taking Part survey is a continuous face to face household survey of adults aged 16 and over and children aged 5 to 15 years old in England (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/taking-part-survey). It collects data on engagement in arts, museums and galleries, archives, libraries, heritage and sport. It includes information on frequency of participation, reasons for participating, barriers to participation and attitudes to the sectors.

    For the comparison with the TALE-survey we used data about 14-15 year-olds from the Taking Part surveys for 2010/11through to 2015/16.
    In the TALE sample females are over-represented (36 % of respondents were male; 60% female. 3 % identify as non-binary and 2 % preferred not to answer the question). To overcome the skewedness of the TALE-sample, a matched subsample was drawn, including 136 female and 139 male 14-15 year olds.
  • The graphs show that students in the TALE schools are significantly more engaged in everyday creative activities – drawing and painting, taking photos, doing craftwork, making films, playing musical instruments, creating music and singing.

  • They read a bit more and are much more likely to perform in plays, create and perform dance, join dance or other clubs.
  • These data also point to school level effects in relation to attendance at cultural events and performances. The implication of these comparative findings is that attending an arts and culture rich school brings the wider benefit of supporting all young people to be active cultural citizens, regardless of whether or not they choose to continue studying arts subjects.
  • These survey results have important implications for the curriculum offered to young people in schools.

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